Internet

Knowledge-Based Trust: Estimating the Trustworthiness of Web Sources

ABSTRACT
The quality of web sources has been traditionally evaluated using
exogenous signals such as the hyperlink structure of the graph. We
propose a new approach that relies on endogenous signals, namely,
the correctness of factual information provided by the source. A
source that has few false facts is considered to be trustworthy.
The facts are automatically extracted from each source by information
extraction methods commonly used to construct knowledge
bases. We propose a way to distinguish errors made in the extraction
process from factual errors in the web source per se, by using
joint inference in a novel multi-layer probabilistic model.
We call the trustworthiness score we computed Knowledge-Based
Trust (KBT). On synthetic data, we show that our method can reliably
compute the true trustworthiness levels of the sources. We
then apply it to a database of 2.8B facts extracted from the web,
and thereby estimate the trustworthiness of 119M webpages. Manual
evaluation of a subset of the results confirms the effectiveness
of the method.

From Knowledge-Based Trust: Estimating
the Trustworthiness of Web Sources [PDF]

Take a Wittgenstein class: He explains the problems of translating language, computer science, and artificial intelligence.

The idea of words having relative meanings was not new, but Wittgenstein pioneered the controversial linguistic conception of meaning-as-use, or the idea that the meanings of words, relative or not, cannot be specified in isolation from the life practices in which they are used. Instead, language should be studied from the starting point of its practices, rather from abstractions to syntax and semantics. As Wittgenstein put it, “Speaking a language is part of an activity, or of a form of life.”

From Take a Wittgenstein class: He explains the problems of translating language, computer science, and artificial intelligence.

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Can free speech survive the internet?

The internet has made it easier than ever to speak to others. It has empowered individuals, allowing us to publish our opinions without convincing a publishing company of their commercial value; to find and share others' views on matters we concern ourselves with without the fuss of photocopying and mailing newspaper clippings; and to respond to those views without the limitations of a newspaper letter page. In this sense the internet has been a great boon to the freedom of speech. 

From 3quarksdaily: Can free speech survive the internet?

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Associated Press sues FBI over fake news story

The AP sent a Freedom of Information Act request to the FBI last year seeking documents related to the 2014 sting. It also seeks to know how many times the FBI has used such a ruse since 2000. The FBI responded to the AP saying it could take two years or more to gather the information requested. Unsatisfied with the response, the Associated Press has taken the matter to court.

From Associated Press sues FBI over fake news story | Ars Technica

Call for Developer: The Wikipedia Library, Digital Library Card Platform

Call for Developers
We are planning to create a Digital Library Card Platform for The Wikipedia Library (see description below). We are looking for a developer, or team, with a history of successfully developing web applications in open development frameworks (such as Drupal, Angular, Ember, CiviCRM, etc.). Efficient production, clear communication, and well-structured and secure code are a must. Additional consideration will go towards applicants who have worked in the Library and Information Science field, on Open Source projects, or in the Wikimedia/Mediawiki communities. Our budget currently allows for $5000-$15,000 for development of a working version within 4- 6 months. We expect to expand the platform in two later phases to add additional functionality around standard online library services.

From Call for Developer: The Wikipedia Library, Digital Library Card Platform - Google Docs

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Jimmy Wales Says Wikipedia Is Losing Traffic From Google

There have been a lot of rumors about the decline in traffic Google is sending Wikipedia’s way. There have been reports from SimilarWeb that Wikipedia has shown a “sudden” and “massive” decline in traffic from Google’s organic search results.

But Jimmy Wales, the co-founder of Wikipedia, said this week that this is not a sudden or drastic drop in traffic from Google, but rather a “long-term issue with decreasing traffic from Google.”

From Jimmy Wales Says Wikipedia Is Losing Traffic From Google

Paying for Internet content

Three stories about paying for Internet content on the radio program "On the Media"
The pieces are better than their titles suggest. I think you will find something of note in each piece.

Putting Tips in the Internet's Guitar Case
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/putting-tips-internets-guitar-case/

Blocking Ad Blocker's
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/blocking-ad-blockers/

This Quack Don't Track
http://www.onthemedia.org/story/quack-dont-track/

I would give all three of these a listen even if the title does not entice you. There is nuance to each piece that I think librarians will find interesting.

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Why City Libraries Are Lending WiFi Hotspots to Low-Income Residents

These lending programs perform a critical role: in addition to providing basic broadband access to low-income residents, they allow patrons to access free e-books and other digital library resources, and they enable users to complete online job applications and perform other critical web-based processes at home. Outreach efforts are also aimed at the elderly and disabled, who often need access to healthcare information.

From Why City Libraries Are Lending WiFi Hotspots to Low-Income Residents | PublicCEO

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The Word the Internet Didn't Know

That’s right: A 17th century English word that means “coming together through the binding of two ropes,” according to a 1627 publication housed at the New York Public Library’s Rare Book Division, was, until this month, dead to the digital world—and to almost every living person.

From The Word the Internet Didn't Know

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The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth

I’ve also learned that the real story is not at all the one you commonly hear—the tale of a gigantic space below our usual web, where hard-to-find vices are traded among sordid individuals totally beyond the grasp of the authorities. That is not what the dark web is.

From The Dark Web as You Know It Is a Myth | WIRED

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