Internet

The most important part of Facebook's disinformation strategy is what it leaves out

But what we’re left with is the real prospect of foreign powers manipulating public discourse, and no clear way to fix it. As with false reporting, Facebook has laid out a plan for more aggressive action against fake accounts, but it’s running up against more serious limits. Even more than false information, disinformation campaigns happen largely outside of Facebook’s control. What should be a reassuring document ends up as an admission of defeat. This is what Facebook can do to fight the problem -- and what it can’t do. The bigger message may be that if we want to protect public discourse, we’ll need more than algorithms.
From The most important part of Facebook's disinformation strategy is what it leaves out - The Verge
Topic: 

That Wasn’t Mark Twain: How a Misquotation Is Born

“When I started off, it was mysterious exactly where these misquotations were coming from, and it was interesting that sometimes you could find these clues that pointed to how they may have originated,” said Mr. O’Toole, an alias for Gregory F. Sullivan, a former teacher and researcher in the Johns Hopkins computer science department who now spends his time writing.
From That Wasn’t Mark Twain: How a Misquotation Is Born - The New York Times
Topic: 

Cliff Stoll discusses the Internet 20 years ago

What did he get right? What did he get wrong?

Topic: 

European court says linking to illegal content is copyright infringement

In a decision that is already controversial, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) has ruled in favor of copyright owners and against hyperlinks. The CJEU decision, though qualified, raises the strong possibility that publishers linking to infringing third party sites will also be liable for infringement.
From European court says linking to illegal content is copyright infringement
Topic: 

The lost infrastructure of social media

More than a decade ago, the earliest era of blogging provided a set of separate but related technologies that helped the nascent form thrive. Today, most have faded away and been forgotten, but new incarnations of these features could still be valuable.
From The lost infrastructure of social media. — Medium
Topic: 

The rise and fall of the Gopher protocol

McCahill told Berners-Lee that he would need to look at the Web more closely. But it wasn’t much to look at when McCahill went back to Minnesota and examined it. There were no graphics yet. It was still only running on NeXT computers. “I wasn’t feeling it,” McCahill says. I told him, ‘Tim, I don’t think so.’ Of course, I look back and say, ‘I might have been wrong.’ ”
From The rise and fall of the Gopher protocol | MinnPost
Topic: 

The End of Books - NY Times Books Section - 1992

Hypertext is truly a new and unique environment. Artists who work there must be read there. And they will probably be judged there as well: criticism, like fiction, is moving off the page and on line, and it is itself susceptible to continuous changes of mind and text. Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.
From The End of Books

Archiveteam: saving our digital heritage.

Archive Team is a loose collective of rogue archivists, programmers, writers and loudmouths dedicated to saving our digital heritage. Since 2009 this variant force of nature has caught wind of shutdowns, shutoffs, mergers, and plain old deletions - and done our best to save the history before it's lost forever. Along the way, we've gotten attention, resistance, press and discussion, but most importantly, we've gotten the message out: IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE THIS WAY. This website is intended to be an offloading point and information depot for a number of archiving projects, all related to saving websites or data that is in danger of being lost. Besides serving as a hub for team-based pulling down and mirroring of data, this site will provide advice on managing your own data and rescuing it from the brink of destruction.
From Archiveteam
Topic: 

The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It

Still, not all the major players agree on whether the web needs decentralizing. “The web is already decentralized,” Mr. Berners-Lee said. “The problem is the dominance of one search engine, one big social network, one Twitter for microblogging. We don’t have a technology problem, we have a social problem.” One that can, perhaps, be solved by more technology.
From The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It - The New York Times
Topic: 

The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It

Still, not all the major players agree on whether the web needs decentralizing. “The web is already decentralized,” Mr. Berners-Lee said. “The problem is the dominance of one search engine, one big social network, one Twitter for microblogging. We don’t have a technology problem, we have a social problem.” One that can, perhaps, be solved by more technology.
From The Web’s Creator Looks to Reinvent It - The New York Times
Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to Internet