Journals & Magazines

Journal of Library Innovation publishes first issue

The Editorial Team of the Journal of Library Innovation has published its first issue. This online, peer-reviewed journal can be viewed at: http://www.libraryinnovation.org.

There are no subscriptions necessary to read the journal. If you haven’t already done so, you may register as a reader in order to receive email notification whenever an issue is published. There is a bibliographic record in WorldCat too, if you would like to add it to your catalog!

The journal is a publication of the Western New York Library Resources Council

How do researchers use online journals?

How do researchers use online journals?
In the paper, the use of Oxford Journals by 10 major UK research institutions was analyzed in the fields of life sciences, economics and history, using the server logs for the full year 2007. Some of the key findings of the study include: One third of users access Oxford Journals outside business hours. Around 40% of sessions originated from a Google Search...

The Times, They Are a-Changing...

From Poynter.org, New York Times to spin off Book Review for e-readers:

The New York Times is planning to offer its Book Review as a separate digital e-reader product, disaggregated from the rest of the Times content on the mobile devices, according to James Dunn, director of marketing for The New York Times.

Dunn alluded to the plan during an afternoon session at the Digital Publishing Alliance (DPA) and E-Reader Symposium at the University of Missouri's Reynolds Journalism Institute. Following the session, Dunn spoke briefly with Poynter's Bill Mitchell and provided additional details.

Mitchell reports the Times will introduce a separate version of its Book Review for three e-reader platforms, beginning with the Sony e-reader in the next couple of weeks. Versions for Amazon's Kindle and Barnes & Noble's Nook will follow. Dunn declined to say what the price will be for the Book Review on these platforms.

Cites & Insights 10:4 (April 2010) Now Available

Cites & Insights 10:4 (April 2010) is now available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ10i4.pdf

The 30-page issue is a PDF print-over-the-web publication, as usual, although three of the four essays are also available in HTML form (the article titles are links). As always, My Back Pages is a PDF-only bonus.

This issue includes:
Perspective: On Disconnecting and Reconnecting (pp. 1-9)

Can you turn off all your "connecting" devices for an hour, a day, a week? Should you? A number of librarians and others discuss the virtues of disconnecting from virtual life once in a while--and maybe reconnecting with ourselves, nature and our real-world friends.

Trends & Quick Takes (pp. 9-16)

The good old days that never were, blaming the user for bad survey design, the difference between production tools and creative talent, checklists for writing and publishing--and ten quicker takes on an even wider range of topics.

Making it Work: Thinking about Blogging 5: Closing the Loop

The close of this four-part series (there was no Thinking about Blogging 3), on how we should blog--and notes on some impressive blog research, miscellaneous issues, and a brief threnody on a dead blog.

My Back Pages -- Read More

The Subconscious Shelf (Or, What Your Books Say About You)

The New Yorker débuts a new photo feature on it's blog today... you submit a photograph of your bookshelf, and we (The New Yorker) tell you what it says about you.

Less than 50 minutes and no charge, if you're picked.

New Owner For Kirkus Reviews/now Kirkus Media

Looks like Kirkus Reviews will live another day to praise — and skewer — authors, but with some rather unorthodox owners for a publication with a long literary pedigree.

Herb Simon, the owner of the Indiana Pacers, the NBA team, and chairman emeritus of Simon Property Group, a shopping mall developer, has bought the venerable journal of prepublication book reviews from the Nielsen Company, which announced in December it was closing the magazine. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Mr. Simon, who is co-owner of an independent bookstore in Montecito, CA, Telecote Books, has appointed Marc Winkelman, chief executive of Calendar Holdings, owner of several chains of seasonal retailers, to be chief executive of what will be re-named Kirkus Media. Mr. Winkelman is also taking a small stake in the company.

NYTimes Media Blog.

Cites & Insights for March 2010

Cites & Insights 10:3 (March 2010) is now available.

The 26-page issue, PDF as usual (with HTML separates for each essay), includes two essays:
Making it Work: Philosophy and Future (pp. 1-22)

Two clusters--one on the philosophy and values of libraries and the other on high-profile statements on libraries and their future.

Perspective: Writing about Reading 5: Going Down Slow (pp. 22-26)

Slow reading and related topics.

Huffington Post: Press Freedom

Check out The Huffington Post's Press Freedom Page ("some news so big it needs its own page"), with stories on how schools in Culpeper County VA have decided to stop assigning The Diary of Ann Frank; and several other stories on banned books and censorship.

New Journal from Yale Librarians

Yale’s libraries don’t just shelve volumes; they also publish their own.

The first issue of the Yale Library Studies journal, a new annual publication put together by the University’s librarians, faculty, related experts and invited authors, was released this month. The journal replaces its biannual predecessor, The Yale University Library Gazette, which was in publication between 1926 and 2008, said Geoffrey Little, editor of the new journal.

To give coherence and consistency to the journal and attract readers who otherwise might not pay attention to the journal, former University Librarian Alice Prochaska decided to give each volume a theme: This year’s is the architecture of Yale’s libraries. “We’ve already heard from [The New Yorker architecture critic] Paul Goldberger ’72 with words of high praise,” Prochaska said.

Cites & Insights 10:2 available

Cites & Insights 10:2 (February 2010) is now available.
The 32-page issue (PDF as usual, with individual articles available in HTML, using the links below) includes:
T&QT Perspective: Trends & Forecasts (pp. 1-16)

A heaping helping of trends, forecasts, ghosts of trends past--and deathspotting. (No, this roundup does not include the Midwinter LITA Top Tech Trends--or any other trendiness actually appearing in 2010. Maybe later.)

Perspective: Music, Silence & Metrics (pp. 16-25)

Are the loudness wars mushing up your music? Maybe so. I report on the problem with excessive dynamic compression, some steps being taken to identify and combat the desire of producers to MAKE IT ALL LOUD, and two sets of real-world metrics. If you ever really listen to music, you should care about this issue.

Offtopic Perspective: Mystery Collection Part 1 (pp. 25-32)

Notes on the first six discs in the 250-movie, 60-disc Mystery Collection, including half a dozen Bulldog Drummond flicks, three Dick Tracy--and eight Sherlock Holmes. Here's a mystery: Will I keep doing C&I long enough to review this entire set? That would take us into Volume 14...

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