Journals & Magazines

Scholars Urge a Boycott of Journals

The Chronicle has an Interesting Story on a looming boycott of scientific and scholarly journals.

The boycotters want publishers to place their content in independent repositories on the Web six months after a journal issue has appeared in print.

See also:
Original Article in Science as well as the Editorial by Science\'s editors who say the proposal puts nonprofit, scholarly publishers at risk.

\"\"As scientists,\" the scholars argue, \"we are particularly dependent on ready and unimpeded access to our published literature, the only permanent record of our ideas, discoveries, and research results, upon which future scientific activity and progress are based.\"

New Issue of Information for Social Change

The UK journal Information for Social Change has a new issue out, No. 12. The articles on the web are as follows:


  • Editorial. John Vincent
  • Clause 28. Anne Ramsden
  • Clause 28 and its effects.
  • Changing times: information destinations of the lesbian, Gay, bisexual and transgender community in Denver, Colorado. Martin Garnar
  • Barriers to GLBT library service in the Electronic Age. Ellen Greenblatt
  • Book review: Ian Lumsden\'s Machos, maricones and gays: Cuba and homosexuality. Review: John Pateman and John Vincent
  • Social Exclusion Action Planning Network
  • Book review: Fidel Castro\'s Capitalism in Crisis. Review: John Pateman

Proposed Reed-Elsevier Acquisition of Harcourt Delayed

Here\'s Some Good News from Infotoday.com. Kim Howells, the U.K. Minister of State for Competition and Consumer Affairs, has delayed the merger, and referred the matter to the Competition Commission. They say the Commission will report by the end of May.

Howells said that the proposed acquisition raises competition concerns that “relate to the market power which the merged company would have in the market for scientific, technical, and medical (STM) journals, and which could have an adverse effect on competition in that market.”

Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship

Science and Technology Librarians:

Are you looking for a place to publish your work in a peer-reviewed journal?
The editors of Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (ISTL) invite
you to submit your work to to our Refereed Section. Articles submitted to
the Refereed Section are put through a blind review by at least two
referees. Our turnaround time, from receipt of your article to notification
of publication status, is a short 6-8 weeks.

Unlike journals from commercial publishers, ISTL does not have a
subscription fee or page charges. It is a high quality, society produced
electronic publication, freely available to all.


More info follows.... -- Read More

Cites and Insights

\'Cites & Insights: Crawford at Large\' continues and expands \'Crawford\'s
Corner,\' a newsletter-within-a- newsletter published in Library Hi Tech
News through December 2000.


Written & prepared by Walt Crawford, the informal newsletter mentions
articles worth reading, articles deserving pointed commentary, and group
reviews within the areas of personal computing, media, libraries, and
related technologies. It also includes feature essays and insights in
those areas. -- Read More

People Still Like to Read

Lois Fundis writes \" The New York
Times
has a Story that one of the nation\'s oldest
magazines (founded 1857), under a new management,
is being redesigned but still focused on \"exploration of
big ideas, big subjects, the American experiment. I do
not mean to get highbrow about it, but that is what The
Atlantic is about.\" It also mentions their longstanding
rivalry with Harper\'s, also founded in the 1850s: \"the
difference between New York and Boston\".

\"

More on Journal Prices

Lee Hadden writes :\"
The price increases for academic journals to libraries has finally
made the Wall Street Journal. The Monday, Jan. 8, 2001 copy, page A26, has
an article by Charles Goldsmith, \"Publish or Perish, But At What Cost to
Academia? World\'s Research Libraries Balk at High Price of Journal
Subscriptions.\"


Seems like we are seeing these stories more often these days. This story likens the journal arena to \"a restaurant that makes you bring your own food and cook it yourself, then presents you with an outragous check and a cover charge.\". The libraries are being queezed by high prices, and with competetion shrinking, don\'t expect the double digit price increases to ease up. They say the median amount spent on journals at research libraries is now over $4 Million!

During Information Glut, Publish and Perish?

Washington Post has Story on all those free newspapers and directories you see all over the place. They are gaining in popularity, street boxes are piling up, and so are the stacks of newspapers in libraries, recreation centers and in local businesses.

People are starting to complain the things are just a waste of space and an eye sore.

Creating Community Controlled Journals

SPARC and the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN) today launch
DECLARING INDEPENDENCE: A GUIDE TO CREATING COMMUNITY-CONTROLLED
SCIENCE JOURNALS, a how-to handbook and web site that guides editors
and editorial board members of scientific journals toward responsible
journal publishing. To see the site or download a PDF version of the
handbook, please go to: arl.org/sparc/DI. -- Read More

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