Journals & Magazines

Forum Finds Hope Beyond the Journals Crisis

Library Journal reports (briefly) on the 10/1 Forum on Publishing Alternatives in Science at Johns Hopkins:

\"We gave our intellectual property away to private firms and scholarly societies,\" said David E. Shulenburger, provost of the University of Kansas . . . \"They have found they can sell it back to us at prices that will produce profits and/or support the cost of other activities.\" Shulenburger had the figures to back up the assertions. From 1986 to 1999, the number of journals grew from 103,700 to 161,000 (55 percent). While the Consumer Price Index increased 49 percent in that period and the price of healthcare went up 111 percent, the cost of scholarly journals increased 175 percent.

More (registration required).

Editorial Board of the Machine Learning Journal Steps Down

Slashdot pointed the way to this most excellent letter of resignation from Machine Learning journal Editorial Board. Forty people have resigned from the Editorial Board of the Machine Learning Journal (MLJ). They say when the journal started fifteen years ago research papers did not circulate easily, but now, articles circulate easily via the Internet. They gone on to say MLJ publications are under restricted access, because universities and research centers pay a yearly fee of $1050. This works to limit contact between the current machine learning community and the potentially much larger community of researchers. They also point out none of the revenue stream from the journal makes its way back to
authors. They see little benefit for a mechanism that ensures revenue for a third party by restricting the communication channel between authors and readers.

Great to see this, I only hope we see it more often!

Managing Scientific Journals in an Academic Library: A Case Study

A case study from the most recent Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship:

Proliferation of online access to primary literature has provided great opportunities for science libraries. Merging these resources with previously held formats, and negotiating with vendors for this access, remains a challenge at many institutions, regardless of size. This article highlights Haverford College\'s attempts to integrate these resources in an effort to enhance accessibility and to reduce costs inherent in this duplication of formats. Areas addressed include material formats, faculty and department cultures, consortial arrangements, users\' habits, implications for the online catalog, financial imperatives and communication patterns between our main and branch libraries. Initiatives currently underway are highlighted, as well as indications of how they will shape our future behaviors.

More.

The Future of Electronic Access to Scientific Literature: A Forum

Here\'s a helpful index of Nature\'s ongoing forum on the future of scientific publishing, including \"No Free Lunch,\" Martin Frank\'s intelligent critique of the Public Library of Science boycott:

The American Physiological Association objected to E-Biomed because it would have undermined both our ability to safeguard the integrity of journal contents and the economic viability of our scholarly journals and the service activities that they support. As with many other scholarly societies, APS uses journal revenues to run and subsidize other programmes, particularly in the areas of education, outreach to under-represented minorities, public affairs, student awards and scientific meetings. . .

Sep 1st Deadline for Public Library of Science Demands

Matt Eberle writes \"September 1st is the deadline for the Public Library of Science demands to be met. 25,000 scientists have pledged to publish in, edit, review for, and subscribe to only journals that agree to make articles available after a 6 month embargo.


Full Story\"

Science Friday discusses scientific journal access

Ursula writes \"Last Friday, NPR\'s Science Friday radio show covered the issue of access to scientific journals. Information about the show is here:
sciencefriday.com


And here\'s a link to the archived show (RealAudio):
npr.org \"

Science world in revolt

Gaurdian Story on the ever growing journal boycott.

More than 800 British researchers have joined 22,000 others from 161 countries in a campaign to boycott publishers of scientific journals who refuse to make research papers freely available on the internet after six months.

\"Science depends on knowledge and technology being in the public domain,\" said Michael Ashburner

free access to archived journals

In September this year, many scientists could stop sending in papers to journals and refuse to renew subscriptions to them in support of a plan to create a huge Public Library of Science on the internet. Two new stories.Publish Free or Perish from Scientific American.

The BBC also has Scientists threaten journal protest.

More On Free Journals

It\'s been here before, but it keeps getting submitted, so I thought I\'d cover it again.

Nature has a Forum on the impact of the Web on the publishing of the results of original research.
In a nutshell, how could scientific information be better handled so that they can work more easily and efficiently, should it be available for free?
If you think so, Sign The Open Letter.
Slashdot also ran a story.

Scholars Urge a Boycott of Journals

The Chronicle has an Interesting Story on a looming boycott of scientific and scholarly journals.

The boycotters want publishers to place their content in independent repositories on the Web six months after a journal issue has appeared in print.

See also:
Original Article in Science as well as the Editorial by Science\'s editors who say the proposal puts nonprofit, scholarly publishers at risk.

\"\"As scientists,\" the scholars argue, \"we are particularly dependent on ready and unimpeded access to our published literature, the only permanent record of our ideas, discoveries, and research results, upon which future scientific activity and progress are based.\"

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