Journals & Magazines

CSM Interviews Librarian of the Year 2011

Another interview with Nancy Pearl, this one in the Christian Science Monitor. In response to the question asked by her fans: "Why did it take so long for her be named LJ's Librarian of the Year?", Pearl replied: "Once a librarian, always a librarian."

The Journal of Universal Rejection (JofUR)

The Journal of Universal Rejection (JofUR)
About the Journal
The founding principle of the Journal of Universal Rejection (JofUR) is rejection. Universal rejection. That is to say, all submissions, regardless of quality, will be rejected. Despite that apparent drawback, here are a number of reasons you may choose to submit to the JofUR:

You can send your manuscript here without suffering waves of anxiety regarding the eventual fate of your submission. You know with 100% certainty that it will not be accepted for publication.
There are no page-fees.
You may claim to have submitted to the most prestigious journal (judged by acceptance rate).
The JofUR is one-of-a-kind. Merely submitting work to it may be considered a badge of honor.
You retain complete rights to your work, and are free to resubmit to other journals even before our review process is complete.
Decisions are often (though not always) rendered within hours of submission.

Cites & Insights February 2011 available

Cites & Insights 11:2 (February 2011) is now available for downloading--at http://citesandinsights.info/civi11i2.pdf (if you're not seeing the link).

The 28-page issue (in PDF form, but with each section available in crude HTML--noting that the first essay would require considerably more paper to print out than the whole PDF issue) includes:
Making it Work Perspective: Five Years Later: Library 2.0 and Balance (pp. 1-26)

It's been five years since Library 2.0 and "Library 2.0" and this seemed like a good time to revisit some of these themes.

Bibs & Blather: Where's Chapter 4? (pp. 26-28)

Why this issue does not include Chapter 4 of The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010.

Library Journal's Librarian of the Year, a Logical Choice

LJ has chosen it's Librarian of 2011, and no surprise, it's the one and only Nancy Pearl.


No one other than Nancy Pearl has so convinced Americans that libraries, books, and reading are critical to our communities. Her passionate advocacy has done that nationwide for thousands of individual readers and library workers in the trenches at the local level. She has spread book lust via broadcasts to the nation on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and from local radio and TV outlets and through her blog posts and tweets. She has done it in hundreds of workshops and performances for library patrons, library staff at all levels, and small groups of readers who want to be with her to discuss what they’ve read and what they have written. She has taught the skills and techniques of collection development, readers’ advisory (RA), and booktalking to the LIS students at the University of Washington Information School, and honed RA skills across staffing lines in the public libraries of Detroit, Tulsa, and Seattle.

Cites & Insights January 2011 now available

Cites & Insights 11:1 (January 2011) is now available for downloading.

The 32-page issue is a PDF download as usual. HTML separates--or, in one case, PDF separate--are available for most essays; follow the links below.

This issue includes:
Bibs & Blather (pp. 1-2)

Announcing The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010 (and a pre-Midwinter early-bird discount) and Cites & Insights 10 in book form (also with a pre-Midwinter discount).

Interesting & Peculiar Products (pp. 2-9)

Sixteen products and eight roundups/Editors' Choices, from USB 3.0 to Windows 7 on an 11-year-old PC.

The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010: Chapter 3: How, Where and When (pp. 9-18)

[Note: This link is to a 6x9" PDF.] Six aspects of most or all of the 1,304 liblogs in this massive study: How they're created (blogging software), where they're written (country of origin), how visible they are (Google Page Rank), when they began, how long they've lasted and currency (a timed snapshot of freshness of posts).

Trends & Quick Takes (pp. 18-24) -- Read More

A Year in Marginalia

Observations, bits & pieces accumulated while reading during the year, by Sam Anderson, New York Magazine Book Editor.

Economist on the new Wikileaks document dump

The Economist has a short piece posted about the most recent document dump from WikiLeaks. A key quote:

Maybe it's something about tech geeks, or maybe it's just related to the self-interest of people and organisations whose particular strength lies in an ability to get a hold of other people's information. But it definitely seems like we're learning a lesson here: while information may want to be free, human beings are usually better off when it's on a leash.

(h/t Glyn Moody)

FREE Webinar - The Journal of Library Innovation

Join the Western NY Library Resources Council and the Journal of Library Innovation for a free webinar on November 18th! Learn why JOLI was developed, the roles of the editorial team, and the editorial & peer review processes. Learn more and register at http://bit.ly/d3HlF5

Cites & Insights Volume 10 index available

The title sheet and indices for Cites & Insights Volume 10 are now available.

The PDF combines a volume title sheet, two-page index to articles cited, and 13-page general index.

That completes Volume 10. The paperback version will be announced when it's ready.

Cites & Insights December 2010 available

Cites & Insights 10:12 (December 2010) is now published and available for downloading.

The 34-page issue is, as always, in PDF form. Five of the six (6! count them, 6) essays are available separately, using the links below. (As always, My Back Pages is exclusively for PDF readers.)

This is not the end of Volume 10, although it is the last issue as such. A title sheet and indices will follow, probably later in November, and the annual paperback print volume will become available at some point.
Contents
Bibs & Blather (pp. 1-2)

Announcing the publication of disContent: The Complete Collection, a limited-edition casebound. Also updating plans for The Liblog Landscape 2007-2010 and repeating the same info as the paragraph above regarding the rest of Volume 10.

Perspective: Futurism and Deathwatches (pp. 2-17)

Thoughts on good and bad futurism and (always-bad?) deathwatches...including the final disContent column, "'Is Dead' Isn't Dead--But Maybe It Should Be."

The CD-ROM Project (pp. 17-19) -- Read More

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