Journals & Magazines

Cites & Insights 9:13 now available

Cites & Insights 9:13 (December 2009) is now available.

The 32-page issue (PDF as usual, but HTML separates are available--see the links below, and also the caveat about the second item) includes:

Bibs & Blather

It's the end of a volume (except for the index, later in November) and the end of an era--YBP's five-year sponsorship. I'm looking for a new sponsor. Also, But Still They Blog: The Liblog Landscape 2007-2009 should be out some time this year...

Making it Work: Purpose, Values and All That Jazz

Commentaries on library values and purpose, including some upbeat commentaries. What's not here: any commentaries on Taiga, Darien or 101. Caveat: The HTML version is provided for online reading--but if you print it out, it will almost certainly be longer than the PDF of the entire issue. Save paper: If you want this printed, do the whole issue.

Offtopic Perspective: 50 Movie Comedy Classics, Part 2

From "comedy in the classical sense" (that is, most characters survive throughout the film) to little-known but quite funny British films and two versions of a Ben Hecht play, with different genders playing the same lead. -- Read More

Your Preference...Rogue or Rouge?

It should not have come as a surprise to former Alaska governor Sarah Palin and her publisher that somebody would take the title of her upcoming memoir, flip two letters and come up with a parody.

That's exactly what's happened. As Entertainment Weekly reports, editors of The Nation plan to publish Going Rouge: Sarah Palin, An American Nightmare on Nov. 17 -- the same day that the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee's Going Rogue: An American Life hits bookstores. NPR offers a poll on which title is more to your liking.

Closing the Book on Gourmet

It's the end of the road for Gourmet Magazine. Petit fours anyone?

But what does a world without Gourmet portend for an age when millions prefer to share recipes online, restaurant criticism is becoming crowd-sourced and newspaper food sections are thinner and thinner?

“It has a certain doomsday quality because it’s not just a food magazine. It represents so much more,” said James Oseland, editor in chief of Saveur, a smaller, younger food magazine. “It’s an American cultural icon.”

The magazine, founded in 1941, thrived on a rush of postwar aspiration and became a touchstone for readers who wanted lives filled with dinner parties, reservations at important restaurants and exotic but comfortable travel.

Issues remain about who will inherit the archives and enormous recipe database. There's also a new book edited by Ruth Reichl, Gourmet Today, which came out just last month.

Print Magazines Closing

Conde Nast will close four magazines -- Modern Bride, Elegant Bride, Gourmet and Cookie -- following a review the publisher undertook to find ways to cut costs and staff in the face of the advertising recession.

Conde Nast, also the publisher of magazines like The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, previously closed its Portfolio business magazine and home decor magazine Domino. Reuters and Wall Street Journal report.

Cites & Insights 9:12 now available

Yes, I know it's pretty early in October for the November issue--but it's ready, and I wanted to stay well out of the way of Open Access Week, so...
Cites & Insights 9:12 (November 2009) is now available
This 34-page issue (PDF as usual, but an HTML version is available if you plan to read it online) consists of one essay:

Library Access to Scholarship

A year's worth of source material and commentary, organized into:
Mandates, Policies and Compacts
The Colors of OA
Numbers
Scandal!
Framing and Mysteries
The Problem(s) with Green OA
Quality, Value and Progress
Miscellany
Conclusion

Chances are, this is the last hurrah for Library Access to Scholarship and my semi-active independent commentary on open access. To coin a phrase, this may be the optimal and inevitable conclusion to close to a decade of work in this area.

One note (repeated at the start of the HTML version): Please don't use the HTML version if you plan to print more than a small portion of the essay. The PDF issue prints out as 34 pages. Depending on your browser and other settings, the HTML version will require 48 to 51 pages, possibly more. (I happen to think the PDF version is a lot more readable as well, but that's probably only true if you're reading in print--which is why I make the HTML version available.)

Cites & Insights 9:11 now available

Cites & Insights 9:11 (October 2009) is now available.

The 30-page issue is, as usual, PDF, with HTML separates available for most of the essays. The issue includes:
Bibs & Blather

Sponsorship still needed, status reports on Cites & Insights Books (one book gone, one going soon...and a new project underway), and one more chance (11 days) to help me decide whether to keep Library Access to Scholarship.

Perspective: Writing about Reading 4

A variety of perspectives on that long-time favorite, The Death of (Print) Books.

Trends & Quick Takes

Seven mini-commentaries and six quicker takes...including a slightly skeptical take on Wolfram|Alpha and fanboy commentators.

Copyright Currents

Musings on fair use--and why it's important that it's an exception to copyright protections, not just a defense against infringement. (Would'ja believe dancing babies?)

My Back Pages

Always a bonus for full-issue readers (it's never available in HTML), this brief installment includes five brief snarky commentaries.

Becoming Bicoastal

In an effort to expand their readership and sales, both the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are planning to start San Francisco editions, the NYT reported. The new editions would offer more local news for the San Francisco Bay Area in a bid to win new readers and advertisers.

Neither paper has released details of their plans, but the NYT spoke to anonymous sources about the Journal's project who explained that the SF edition would contain a page or two of general interest news from California, probably once a week. It anticipates starting the new edition in November or December.

The Wall Street Journal is also looking at a weekly arts and culture section focused on New York City, according to reports in July. This has been interpreted as an attempt to compete more directly with the Times, and a San Francisco edition, if it does indeed include general interest rather than business news, is likely to be viewed in the same light. The Times itself is considering regional editions based in other cities, according to the NYT article.

A Newspaper Comeback Plan

Pat Holt of Holt Uncensored decries the plummeting of print newspaper sales, and offers several serious suggestions to publishers.

"After our 30-year honeymoon with computers, and 20 solid years on the Internet, people are getting tired of screens and starting to miss the newsprint experience. It’s time for newspapers to earn their way back into readers’ minds and pocketbooks. Here are some suggestions:

Fight for Your Paper - Everybody’s waiting for publishers to do something — to, in the first place, define the benefits of newspapers that computers can’t offer. If you run a newspaper, the time has come to get out there and tell readers: Our paper publishes the kind of stories in print that you can’t find on the Internet.

This means that the newsprint version will be different from the website version, so you have to believe in it. If you don’t think that newspapers are far ahead of the Internet in key ways, get outta the biz."

Latest Magazine to File for Bankruptcy

The Reader’s Digest Association Monday became the latest magazine publisher weighted down by severe debt to file for bankruptcy protection. RDA said it reached an agreement in principle with a majority of its senior secured lenders on terms of a restructuring plan to reduce the company’s debt from $2.2 billion to $550 million, and expects to file a pre-packaged Chapter 11 petition for its U.S. business within the next 30 days.

RDA's lender group will also provide the company with $150 million in debtor-in-possession financing which, it said, will be convertible into exit financing upon emergence from Chapter 11.

But, there will always be Reader's Digests....won't there?

She Wanted To be a Librarian, But She'll Have to Settle for Being a Star

Jennifer Garner tells Oprah Magazine, that when she was a young’n growing up in West Virginia she always wanted to be a librarian.

“I had a very rich imaginary world,” said Garner, who is 37. “And my dream was to grow up to be a librarian, because I had a librarian named Mrs. McCann who I thought was the most magical woman on the planet. She used to publish little versions of my stories, typing them on manila folders and illustrating them with pictures of me and my teddy bear.”

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