Book Reviews

Books Done Better: You Tell Us How

Book review staff at NPR ask for feedback about what books they should look at in the future.

Full piece here.

Ron Charles Spooktacular Book Review (now with VIDEO!)

OMG, he's lost his the woods...with books he HASN'T even read. The Washington Post's Ron Charles presents... "I'M NOT A WITCH, I'M A BOOK CRITIC". Guest appearance by author Lisa Scottoline in a reenactment of Hitchcock's shower scene from Psycho. Wild.

Review: Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self

@Roncharles (Washington Post) tweets: "Totally Hip Video Book Reviewer dons bacon, admits errors, loves Danielle Evans' short story collection BEFORE YOU SUFFOCATE YOUR OWN FOOL SELF." Here's the video book review and the written review.

Cooler Than a Book...It's BOOKER

Another video book review of the Book Prize Finalists from the Washington Post's hipper than hip Ron Charles:

Meet Adele Mundy, Badass Space Librarian

Even fantasy librarians can be awesome.

For conspiring against the government of Cinnabar, her family was massacred; she is the sole survivor. She's a scholar, a librarian turned Signals Officer who has joined Daniel Leary, a lieutenant in the Republic of Cinnabar Navy (RCN) to battle against treacherous politicians, the Alliance, rebels, and all manner of galactic grief and peril. She is a master of information technology and spy craft. She likes weapons and knows how to use them.

Don't mess with Adele Mundy, sharpshooting librarian in space. More on this title, "Some Golden Harbor" by David Drake at BookTryst.

DAILY SHOW Appearance Trumps NYT BR

EarlyWord has an interesting entry titled:
DAILY SHOW Appearance Trumps NYT BR

Excerpt: It can now be quantified; an appearance on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart does more for a book’s sales than a review in the NYT Book Review.

Full entry here:

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Franzen's New Novel Freedom

Did you enjoy the last Ron Charles video book review? Here's the new one...on Jonathan Franzen's new and highly anticipated title, Freedom. Washington Post review.

A Look Back at the History of Print and Publishing (or It's Always Been a Tough Business)

Change of pace from the more frequent 'death of print' stories here on LISNews.

This one's about the birth of print; a discussion of the newly published book by Andrew Pettegree, "The Book in the Renaissance" with Tom Scocca of Slate and the Boston Globe.

In the beginning, before there was such a thing as a Gutenberg Bible, Johannes Gutenberg laid out his rows of metal type and brushed them with ink and, using the mechanism that would change the world, produced an ordinary little schoolbook. It was probably an edition of a fourth-century grammar text by Aelius Donatus, some 28 pages long. Only a few fragments of the printed sheets survive, because no one thought the book was worth keeping.

“Now had he kept to that, doing probably would all have been well,” said Andrew Pettegree, a professor of modern history at the University of St. Andrews and author of “The Book in the Renaissance,” the story of the birth of print. Instead, Gutenberg was bent on making a grand statement, an edition of Scripture that would cost half as much as a house and would live through the ages. In the end, struggling for capital to support the Bible project, Gutenberg was forced out of his own print shop by his business partner, Johann Fust.

The article continues in a question and answer format here.

Video Book Review

Too much reading to do? Get your book review fix by video. Here's Ron Charles of the Washington Post reviewing "My Hollywood" by Mona Simpson:

Got Mockingjay?

Iowa City, IA — The hold shelves Tuesday at the Iowa City Public Library were peppered with the pale blue spine of "Mockingjay," the third and supposedly final installment in "The Hunger Games" blockbuster trilogy of young-adult novels by Suzanne Collins. Katniss Everdeen, 16, is the protagonist in a dystopian future version of North America known as Panem. It's a harsh dictatorship, where children from 12 blighted districts battle each other to the death in an annual reality-TV game show, to the delight of the pampered citizens.

I spent part of my summer reading the first two installments in the series, 2008's "The Hunger Games" and last year's "Catching Fire."
I think I'm OK revealing that, because I've learned I'm hardly alone among allegedly mature readers.

Jason Paulios, 32, the librarian in the young adults' corner here in the Iowa City library, tallied a "mind-boggling" 93 holds for "Mockingjay," released Tuesday.

Glen Rock, NJ - on Monday the library hosted its first-ever sleepover party, in conjunction with the release of "Mockingjay," Suzanne Collins' newest book in the "Hunger Games" series.

Nancy Pearl's twitter feed: Mockingjay: triumphant finale: painfully sad,many deaths,hard decisions;same courageous Katniss. Made me want to reread 1&2 in the series.


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