Book Reviews

The Future of Book Reviews Critics vs Amazon Reviewers

Top critics Morris Dickstein and Cynthia Ozick debate who are truly the book critics today (hint: Amazon reviewers) and what this means for reviewing. Jane Ciabattari reports.

In the age of rapid digital revolution in publishing, when readers have book review options ranging from decades-old publications like The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times Book Review, to Twitter book clubs, literary websites, online publications like this one, and Amazon reader reviews, what is the role of the book reviewer? And how has that role changed?


What Gingrich reveals in his many book reviews

What Gingrich reveals in his many book reviews
Along with college professor and bestselling author, the former Republican Speaker of the House added presidential candidate to his resume today. But if Gingrich wished, he might also include his ranking as an “top reviewer.” Indeed, he hit his peak in 2004 rising into the top 500 of the site’s reviewers, based on how often readers found his reviews helpful. Since then his ranking has slipped, and he hasn’t posted a review since 2008.

The Rationality of One-Star Reviews

The Rationality of One-Star Reviews
But how did customers respond to this pricing decision? They were outraged! As you can see on the product page, the book has been overwhelmed with one-star reviews based not on the quality of the book itself but instead on the perception of greed and unfairness on behalf of the publisher. “junk,” writes Amazon reviewer Juan M. “It’s ridiculous that the E-BOOK is as much as the physical copy. Greed indeed.”


West Of Here': What Happened To The Frontier?

From <a href=>NPR's Morning Edition</a>: <blockquote>In his new book, "West of Here", novelist Jonathan Evison takes readers back to one of the last unexplored territories of the American West: Washington state's Olympic Peninsula ...

Newbery & Caldecott Medals Awarded at ALA Midwinter

From the LA Times/ Jacket Copy Blog: The American Library Assn. presented its top honors for books for children and young adults at a ceremony in San Diego Monday morning. The highest award, the Newbery Medal, is awarded each year to the most distinguished book for children; it went to "Moon Over Manifest" by Clare Vanderpool. The Caldecott Medal, the top award for illustration, went to the book "A Sick Day for Amos McGee," illustrated by Erin E. Stead and written by Philip C. Stead.

The ALA award medallions, which can be found on the covers of later editions of the winning books, not only signify excellence, they also can mean a longer commercial life for the books, as well as assure they find a place in libraries. Finalists also receive the medallions.

The hour-long ceremony, which began at 7:45 a.m., included the announcement of dozens of awards and finalists before an audience attending the ALA's midwinter conference. The roster of winners was too long to invite the authors, illustrators or publishers to the podium to accept their awards.

A Year in Marginalia

Observations, bits & pieces accumulated while reading during the year, by Sam Anderson, New York Magazine Book Editor.

Best Novels of 2010 According to Ron Charles

It's hip, it's happening, it's a round-up...from the totally hip Ron Charles of the Washington Post.

Non-Book Items (That Don't Exist) But Would Make Great Gifts!

Ron Charles has several non-book items to recommend as gifts; "the booklie" (super-size one-size fits all, made from the pages of remaindered novels), "spine" (the scent of reading) and the "doogk" (an ereader for our canine friends) among them. Special author appearance by Julie Klam and her doggie. Nice production values! From the Washington Post's 'totally hip book reviewer'.

'The Passages of H.M.' Reviewed by Ron Charles

Another great (better than evah!) video book review from Ron Charles, the Washington Post's 'totally hip book reviewer'. Book is 'The Passages of H.M.' by Jay Parini, a biography about author Herman Melville, beloved (but apparently rather weird) author of Moby Dick. Mrs. totally hip totally helps out:


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