Anne Rice signs petition to protest bullying of authors on Amazon

Anne Rice has tackled vampires, werewolves and witches in her fiction, but now the bestselling novelist is taking on a real-life enemy: the anonymous "anti-author gangsters" who attack and threaten writers online.

The Interview with the Vampire author is a signatory to a new petition, which is rapidly gathering steam, calling on Amazon to remove anonymity from its reviewers in order to prevent the "bullying and harassment" it says is rife on the site. "They've worked their way into the Amazon system as parasites, posting largely under pseudonyms, lecturing, bullying, seeking to discipline authors whom they see as their special prey," Rice told the Guardian. "They're all about power. They clearly organise, use multiple identities and brag about their ability to down vote an author's works if the author doesn't 'behave' as they dictate."

Here's The Petition

Hundreds of Ann Frank's Diary Copies Vandalized in Tokyo's Libraries

From The New York Times:

TOKYO — Japan on Friday promised to begin an investigation into the mysterious mutilation of hundreds of copies of “Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl” and other books related to her at public libraries across Tokyo.

Local news media reports said 31 municipal libraries had found 265 copies of the diary by Frank, the young Holocaust victim, and other books vandalized, usually with several pages torn or ripped out. The reports said some libraries had taken copies of the diary off their shelves to protect them.

Officials said they did not know the motive for the vandalism, the first cases of which were discovered earlier this month.

Literary Twitter’s Best Tweets

So, to present literary Twitter in its best possible light, we are returning again to those most widely followed on literary Twitter, but this time, looking at which Tweets got the most favorites, we are highlighting each literary Twitterer’s best tweet. Here you’ll find much wry humor, gossip, lots of politics, Margaret Atwood flirting with a Twitter-famous comedian, and even a surprising amount of insight crammed into 140 characters. They may be enough to win over some fresh converts.


When did there become too many books to read in one lifetime?

A tough nut to crack to be sure, but Randall Munroe has taken a stab at it on his wonderfully quirky What If? site.

"The average person can read at 200-300 words per minute. If the average living writer, over their entire lifetime, falls somewhere between Isaac Asimov and Harper Lee, they might produce 0.05 words per minute over their entire lifetime. If you were to read for 16 hours a day at 300 words per minute,[4] you could keep up with a world containing an average population of 100,000 living Harper Lees or 400 living Isaac Asimovs."

Why Even Creative Writers Need the Library

This author talk has happened but the ideas mentioned in the article, discussing the talk, are worth reading.


Pogue, Times Technology Columnist, Is Leaving for Yahoo

After writing about personal technology for The Times for 13 years, David Pogue will start a consumer technology Web site at Yahoo.

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Author Tom Clancy Dead at 66

Reuters reports that author Tom Clancy died aged 66 on October 2nd at Johns Hopkins. Clancy has a novel pending publication that is set for release in December entitled "Command Authority". CBS News gathered a variety of star tributes to Clancy made today.


Questions For Hugh Howey, Author Of 'WOOL'

NPR piece: Questions For Hugh Howey, Author Of 'WOOL'

Wool - Part One is a free download on Amazon.

Disclaimer: The free first segment of Wool leaves you at a cliffhanger that makes you want to keep reading. The entire multi-part story is available for $5.99. See - Wool Omnibus Edition (Wool 1 - 5) (Silo Saga)

You can buy part 2 for .99 if you want to try one part after the free part without investing the full $5.99.


New Books From J.D. Salinger?

J.D. Salinger Will Publish Five More Goddamn Books
According to Salinger, a new documentary produced by the Weinstein Co., and a corresponding 700-page book of the same title by the film’s director, Shane Salerno, and co-author David Shields, he spent at least some of that time at a typewriter. The new investigation into the author’s life claims that Salinger left behind explicit instructions to his estate to publish five books beginning in 2015. The New York Times reported that Salinger’s new works include: a “story-filled ‘manual’ of the Vedanta religious philosophy”; a book called The Family Glass, with five never-before-seen stories; another collection of stories called The Last and Best of the Peter Pans, which will revisit the Caulfield family from The Catcher in the Rye; a novella based on Salinger’s years as a soldier in World War II; and a new novel set during the same period about the author’s first marriage.


Elmore Leonard, Who Refined the Crime Thriller, Dies at 87

Mr. Leonard’s louche characters and deadpan dialogue in novels like “Get Shorty” elevated the popular crime thriller to a higher literary shelf.

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