Authors

J.K. Rowling revealed as writer of crime novel

An ex-military man tries his hand at writing, publishes a debut detective novel and wins critical acclaim. But here's the twist in the tale: The true identity of the author is none other than "Harry Potter" creator J.K. Rowling.

It's impressive literary wizardry by Rowling, who said she relished the freedom of writing "The Cuckoo's Calling" under her pseudonym Robert Galbraith.

Full story -- USA Today

Book is currently #1 on Amazon -- The Cuckoo's Calling

Facing a boycott due to anti-gay stance, Ender's Game author Orson Card speaks out

Facing a boycott due to anti-gay stance, Ender’s Game author Orson Card speaks out
Geeks.Out states, “However much you may have admired his books, keep your money out of Orson Scott Card’s pockets.” In a statement send to Entertainment Weekly on Monday Card stated that, “‘Ender’s Game’ is set more than a century in the future and has nothing to do with political issues that did not exist when the book was written in 1984. With the recent Supreme Court ruling, the gay marriage issue becomes moot. The Full Faith and Credit clause of the Constitution will, sooner or later, give legal force in every state to any marriage contract recognized by any other state.”

Local Officials Look to Make American Cities More Livable

According to Bruce Katz and Jennifer Bradley, local officials are searching for new ways to innovate and make urban centers more livable. Judy Woodruff talks with Katz and Bradley, authors of "The Metropolitan Revolution," about major moves at U.S. city halls to breath new life into the American economy and democracy.

A Librarian Sets Us Straight

For years, thousands of children throughout the world have been studying a poem about sunflowers believing it to be the work of the 19th-century poet William Blake.

Reading lists have included it for study, websites have included it in lesson plans and four US state school boards have recommended it to students. There is even anecdotal evidence of one of Britain’s Ofsted inspectors accepting “the fact” of Blake’s authorship of the poem when it was presented to her by a group of young students via a project on their display board.

Now though, after a 12-year misunderstanding which illustrates how effectively the internet can spread misinformation, the record could finally be put straight thanks to the diligence of a Hertfordshire librarian and blogger.

Thomas Pitchford, aka “The Library Spider”, has verified that the poem – “Two Sunflowers Move into the Yellow Room” – was written by a 1980s US poet, Nancy Willard, and published in an anthology of hers dedicated to Blake’s work, A Visit to William Blake’s Inn.

Story from The Independent.

Ray Bradbury's Books to Go to Waukegan Library

From the Daily Herald:

Author Ray Bradbury moved to Los Angeles in 1934 and spent the rest of his life on the West Coast, but his fondness for Waukegan IL never dissipated.

After his death, in June of last year, library officials learned Bradbury had bequeathed his personal book collection to the County Street facility. It's no small gift.

"Every room had a bookshelf overflowing," said Rena Morrow, the library's marketing, programming, and exhibits manager. The collection contains some books that could be valuable, such as first editions of noted works or autographed books, Morrow said.

The library also stands to receive copies of books Bradbury wrote, including some in foreign languages. The collection's value is being appraised.

The library may receive some of Bradbury's personal belongings, too.
"We'd like to get one of his typewriters," library Executive Director Richard Lee said. "He had four."

How Technology Widens Class Divisions

Paul Solman speaks with Jaron Lanier, widely regarded as the father of virtual reality and the author of "Who Owns the Future?", about how big computers -- and the government and businesses they empower -- are creating more economic inequality.

 

Author Reflects on the Long, Deadly Road to WWII Victory



In honor of the 69th anniversary of D-Day, Ray Suarez talks to historian Rick Atkinson about his new book, "The Guns at Last Light," which chronicles the brutal fight for victory at the end of World War II.

An Inside Look at Backstories of Decisions in Supreme Court

In her new book, "The Roberts Court," Marcia Coyle of the National Law Journal and regular NewsHour contributor takes a look at the landmark decisions that have reached the Supreme Court during the tenure of Chief Justice John Roberts. She talks to Jeffrey Brown about her observations and interviews with the justices.

Google's Schmidt, Cohen Describe a 'New Digital Age'

Schmidt and Cohen authored a book - The New Digital Age

Authors@Google - Teresa Amabile: The Progress Principle

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