Authors

Books On Our Shelves Define Us As Much As the Clothes On Our Backs

From the Plattsburg, (NY) Press Republican, Diane Petryck Bloom writes...

\"When a flood burst through the doors of the little library in Lincoln, VT, three generations of the townsfolk, ages 8 to 80, lined up old-fashioned bucket-brigade style to save what books they could. \'Despite the water in their own basements,\' said author Chris Bohjalian, who lives in the 1,000-resident town, \'the people thought that was the most important thing to be doing.\' Bohjalian, in Plattsburgh recently to address a gathering of the Clinton-Essex-Franklin Library System staff and friends, used the story to promote his belief that no mere e-text of any kind will supplant the traditional book.\" more...

Eudora Welty May Have Left Unpublished Work

From The Chicago Sun Times, Jason Straziuso writes...

\"Eudora Welty, who died last week at age 92, published no new fiction after 1973. But she spent years typing away, raising the tantalizing possibility that there is unpublished work sitting in her attic. Welty was one of the 20th century\'s most beloved authors and the first living writer to be given her own volume in the prestigious Library of America series. Any posthumous work would attract widespread interest.\" more...

Is Shakespeare Now Canadian?

Bob Cox sent along This Washington Post Story on A 1603 Painting in Toronto Purports to Show the Young William Shakespeare, if they prove to be right, the picture may be the only one of him painted while he was still alive.
The owner says the portrait was painted by an ancestor named John Sanders, who may have been an actor in a theatrical company owned by Shakespeare.

\"It looks to be quite conceivably a 1603 painting of someone. Whether it is Shakespeare, we won\'t be able to answer,\" says Christina Corsiglia, curator of European art of the Art Gallery of Ontario. \"We don\'t know what he ultimately looked like.\"

Dead Authors Get No Respect

Robin Finn writes...

\"This country does a crummy job as guardian of great books by its dead authors. Or it used to. Edmund Wilson voiced that criticism 40 years ago, crankily and accurately.\" [more...] from the New York Times (don\'t have your free subscription? get it Here.

Dickens letter sells for GBP5,000

Fourteen letters written by Charles Dickens between 1849 and 1854 were sold at auction today in Tavistock, Devon (UK). The most expensive of them sold for 5,000 pounds sterling (about $7,500) and they will all stay in the UK, with many being bought by public institutions and museums. More from the BBC News.
These letters were found tucked inside a book owned by a direct descendent of Georgina Morson, governess of a women\'s refuge founded by Dickens in 1847.

Read the book, then discuss with author

USA Today has a Story on how more and more writers are trying to generate sales by connecting with reading groups either by phone or in person. It\'s great for the authors to connect with their fans and get feedback, cheers and jeers.

\"If I can talk to you for 400 pages, you should have the right to talk back to me for a paragraph,\" says Harlan Coben. The author of seven previous mysteries, his new thriller, Tell No One, hit stores Tuesday. \"It\'s easy to pretend you\'re jaded but I really get a kick out of hearing from readers.\"

Nicholson Baker on the Air

Nicholson Baker was interviewed about Doublefold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper this afternoon on the inimitable KCRW\'s show \"Bookworm.\" The show should be available as a Real Audio file from the \"Bookworm\" site sometime in the next few days.

Favorite Books

NPR is running a neat series called Favorite Books NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg talks with famous authors about the books they most prize. Each Tuesday in June, listen to Stamberg\'s author interviews on Morning Edition.

Some of the authors include Barry Lopez, Francesca Lia Block, Paule Marshall and Walter Mosley.

Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001

I\'m way beind on everything here, so you probably already heard, but I feel the need to post this anyways.

Douglas Adams died at age 49 of a heart attack in Santa Barbara, CA. If there was a funnier book than The Hitchhiker\'s Guide I\'ve never read it.

Bob Cox sent along This Great Tribute as well.

Librarian/author James Still

Lee Hadden Writes:\"On today\'s \"Morning Edition\" talk show on National Public Radio, there
was an account of the librarian and author James Still.
The web page.\"

\"Remembering Writer James Still -- Host Bob Edwards talks
with professor Ted Olson about the works of Appalachian
writer James Still, who died at 94 this weekend. Still\'s
work was widely popular in the 1930\'s, but he never
received as much notoriety as other writers of the time.
Now a new collection of his poetry will be published by The
University Press of Kentucky in June. It\'s called \"From the
Mountain, From the Valley.\"

Syndicate content