Authors

The mystery of Hannah Crafts

Charles Davis sent over The mystery of Hannah Crafts.
By John Bloom
Who was Hannah Crafts. Was Hannah Crafts really a black woman? Was she really a slave? How do we know she wasn\'t a tea-sipping housewife in Morristown who wanted to help abolish slavery?
In case you missed the ballyhoo, 16 months ago an obscure 301-page handwritten manuscript was offered for auction at the Swann Galleries in New York. The title page read \"The Bondwoman\'s Narrative by Hannah Crafts, a Fugitive Slave, Recently Escaped from North Carolina.\"

The catalog said that the manuscript appeared to be from the 1850s and that it was \"uncertain that this work is written by a \'negro,\'\" but that there was textual evidence to suggest that it was written by a slave — for example, \"her escape route is one sometimes used by run-aways.\"

\'Turner Diaries\' author dies

James Nimmo sent over Word That White supremacist leader William Pierce, whose book The Turner Diaries is believed to have inspired Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, died Tuesday. He was 68.
Mr. Pierce\'s novel, published in 1978, depicts a violent overthrow of the government by a small band of white supremacists who finance themselves through counterfeiting and bank robbery.

FBI investigators have said Mr. McVeigh was a fan of Mr. Pierce\'s book and used it as a blueprint for bombing the Oklahoma City federal building in 1995. The book includes a truck-bombing of FBI headquarters.

Chaim Potok dies at age 73

If you work in a public library you may want to whip up a book display of the late author\'s work. Here are a few links to obits that can be printed and photocopied for patrons.

Baltimore Sun

Philadelphia Inquirer

MSNBC

Washington Post

Jane Austen first editions discovered in Scottish

Charles Davis writes \"First editions of Jane Austen\'s novel Pride And Prejudice have been uncovered at a Scottish castle. The three volumes are expected to fetch between £8,000 and £12,000 when they are auctioned on Friday.

Story at
Ananova
\"

Bad writing contest honours the dark and stormy

SomeOne writes \"And I use that [Authors] Topic Lightly....
Rephah Berg of Oakland, California, who normally writes slogans for lapel buttons has won the 2002 Bulwer-Lytton Bad Writing Award for a piece which compared a faltering relationship to a balky roll of toilet paper.

Ms Berg\'s submission, reads:


\"On reflection, Angela perceived that her relationship with Tom had always been rocky - not quite a roller-coaster ride but more like when the toilet paper roll gets a little squashed so it hangs crooked and every time you pull some off you can hear the rest going bumpity-bumpity in its holder until you go nuts and push it back into shape, a degree of annoyance that Angela had now almost attained.\"

\"

Michael Moore to Help Librarians

Lee Hadden writes: \" Michael Moore recounted his assistance from librarians in getting his
recent book published, \"Stupid White Men,\" and shows his appreciation by
organizing a group of fellow authors \"...advocating critical library issues
such as better pay, better benefits, sexism and pay equity. Through his
website he is offering videos of his television shows as well as his
previous movies free to all librarians. He is also offering an endowment to
establish a scholarship for minorities who wish to become librarians...\"
Read more about it in the article by Michael Byrnes, \"A Morning With
Michael Moore,\" on page 16 of the ALA Cognotes Annual Highlights found in This PDF.\"

Neil Gaiman likes librarians!

For nearly a year now, I\'ve been reading the journal/blog of one of my favourite authors, Neil Gaiman. It is always interesting and amusing reading anyway, but he was at ALA last week and as a result has written some nice words about librarians (scroll down to the entry from Sunday 16th June).

\"I don\'t think it\'s overstating things to suggest these people are the thin grey line between literacy and barbarism\"

If you like what you read in the journal, I would highly recommend his novels - try last year\'s excellent American Gods. I\'m just disappointed that I\'m not in the US anymore and so couldn\'t be at ALA this year.

Anna Patchett surprise winner of women\'s Orange Fiction Prize

The Telegraph says Anna Patchett, the only American writer on the shortlist, was the
surprise winner of this year\'s £30,000 women\'s Orange Fiction Prize for
her novel Bel Canto.Bel Canto was the outsider at 7-1 and
has received a mixed reaction from
British reviewers.

Dr. Seuss Sculpture Garden Unveiled

Kathy sent over This One on the new $6.2 million sculpture garden unveiled to honor the late Theodor Geisel, the beloved children\'s author better known as Dr. Seuss.
Meanwhile, back in Whoville, Some People Are Not happy Congress paid for the Seuss statues using $950,000 that was earmarked for poor communities.

\"It\'s probably too late to do anything about it now, but the next best thing is to complain about it, which is what we\'re good at.\"

Joyce archive bought for 8 Million Pounds

Charles Davis writes \"Hundreds of manuscripts and notes penned by
the novelist James Joyce have been bought by
the National Library in Dublin for £8m.

The rare collection, believed to be the largest
of its kind - includes unseen drafts of the
classic book Ulysses.

The collection - totalling more than 500 pieces
- was brought to Dublin from Paris by Ireland\'s
Arts Minister Sile de Valera.

Prime Minister Bertie Aherne was at Dublin
Airport to welcome the manuscripts to the
country.

The documents were purchased from Alexis
Leon, the son of Joyce\'s former aide, the late
Paul Leon.

Full story at
The BBC

\"

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