Authors

<i>Family Matters</i> Author Mistry Cuts Short US Tour

India-born Canadian citizen Mistry cites airport racial profiling as the reason for his decision.

From the Yahoo story: \"As a person of color he was stopped repeatedly and rudely at each airport along the way -- to the point where the humiliation for both he and his wife has become unbearable,\" the newspaper quoted the memo as saying.

Thanks again to Publisher\'s Lunch for the tip.

Fairytale Life for Princess Diaries\' Author

Here\'s A Nice Reuters Story on Meg Cabot, author of best-selling books \"The Princess Diaries.\"
She says for some reason, people think that she\'s a real princess and that the books are really about her.
Cabot\'s books about Mia Thermopolis, the gawky New York teenager who discovers she is really a princess and heir to a tiny European kingdom, have sold more than a million copies around the world and been turned into a film by Disney.

Scolded author quits Emory

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has A Story that says an Emory University history professor has resigned after an outside academic panel issued a report condemning his research for a book that went to the heart of the national controversy over gun control.

R-rated lines net apology

Charlotte-Mecklenburg public library director Robert Cannon apologized Tuesday for a sexually explicit reading at the publicly funded Novello Festival of Reading. He said said the library should have warned the audience of 450 about the content beforehand.

The author said he wouldn't want to speak in a place so conservative that his work requires a warning label.

"This is the world their children are going to grow up in," he said, adding that he didn't recall seeing children in the audience. "They're going to hear dirty language. They're going to hear about sex."

Notebook of Philip Larkin poems saved from dump

Charles Davis writes \"A notebook of \'lost\' poems and jottings by Philip Larkin has emerged in
his home town of Hull after reportedly being saved from the rubbish tip
by an attentive furniture worker.
Although volunteers from the Larkin Society, which guards the memory of the poet, meticulously cleared his home of work, the red A5 volume is
said to have been acquired from the company sent to take his furniture to the dump.

Full story at
The Independent \"

Your book, printed on demand

The IHT has a Look At print on demand services for aspiring authors.
They say in the same way that the home computer gave users the ability to create a document that looked good, even if it didn\'t necessarily read well, print-on-demand services now enable people to publish a book with ease, regardless of whether anyone else would want to read it.

No sex please, we're American Christian Romance Writers

James Nimmo pointed to This One on the American Christian Romance Writers convention. They say when it comes to expressing their feelings, members of the ACRW are more concerned with prayers than affairs. After the predictable round of speakers and workshops, the two-day conference will close with a brief religious service.

Jorge Ramos at Dallas Public Library

SomeOne writes \"Jorge Ramos, Univision anchorman, is on tour and the only stop at a library was at Dallas Public. Latinos came out by the droves to see him promote his latest book about his own personal version of the American Dream. Mr. Ramos drew a crowd that packed the room like sardines with the overflow sandwiched from the hall to the elevator! Kudos to Dallas Public for inviting him but to everyone who was breathing under the armpit of the person next to him we would have preferred to have had the book signing in the larger auditorium. Again the Hispanic presence and influence in this country has been underestimated. \"

Stephen Ambrose Died Sunday, October 13th, 2002.

Teacher, historian, and author Stephen Ambrose died Sunday, 13 October
2002 at age 66 of lung cancer.

Search: <Stephen
Ambrose> in:

<Google-[News]>
<PBS
NewsHour
> <Teoma>
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The Nobel Prize in Literature 2002

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2002. The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2002 is awarded to the Hungarian writer Imre Kertész.

\"The refusal to compromise in Kertész’s stance can be perceived clearly in his style, which is reminiscent of a thickset hawthorn hedge, dense and thorny for unsuspecting visitors. But he relieves his readers of the burden of compulsory emotions and inspires a singular freedom of thought.\"

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