Authors

The Virtual Book Tour

Bob Cox writes "The Virtual Book Tour (VBT) empowers publishers and authors with modest marketing budgets to reach a wider, desirable audience without leaving home. Harnessing the power of personal websites, weblogs and viral marketing, the VBT plans, coordinates and schedules “author stops” at 10 of the most intriguing and diverse sites on the web, enabling authors, publicists and publishers to promote quality books in an efficient, cost-effective way."

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Moose settles ethics dispute over sniper case book

Jen Young writes "CNN Reports former Montgomery County, Maryland, Police Chief Charles Moose reached a deal with the county ethics commission Tuesday that clears the way for him to write a book and pursue a movie project about the sniper investigation, his attorney said.
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Children\'s Book Author McCloskey Dies

Tina Emerick writes \"Robert McCloskey has died at the age of 1988. He is the author of such works as \"Make Way for Ducklings\" and \"Homer Price.\" McCloskey died Monday at a home on Deer Isle after a long illness, said Katrina Weidknecht, director of publicity at Penguin Books for Young Readers. Here\'s The Obituary \"

Lee Hadden also adds There is an interesting article on children\'s literature and authors in
the Wall Street Journal for July 2, 2003. \"Children\'s Author Robert McCloskey
Put the Real World in His Books In the Fray.\" By AMY FINNERTY

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Author 'Blessed' by Oprah

CNN has This One on Jacquelyn Mitchard who just finished a 23-city tour to promote her latest book, "Twelve Times Blessed." She attributes much of her success to Oprah Winfrey, whom she calls her "fairy godmother."
Mitchard was a columnist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, struggling to raise three young children and a high schooler on her own after her first husband died from cancer, when Winfrey selected the writer's first novel, "The Deep End of the Ocean," for her book club, in 1996.

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Orwell Legend Comes Under Review 100 Years On

Here's A Reuters story on British author George Orwell.
But true to his own quip that "saints should always be judged guilty until they are proved innocent," the Orwellian myth is coming under new scrutiny around the centenary of his birth in an Indian village on June 25, 1903.

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Rush Limbaugh: Hillary's publisher lying

John Grubb writes "WorldNetDaily.com is Reporting:

"Radio talk-show giant and best-selling author Rush Limbaugh is making it absolutely clear what he thinks about the purported success of Hillary Clinton's new book, "Living History."

"He says reports of record purchases are simply not true."

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Opening Gambits

Two weeks ago, The Independent invited folks to submit the first few words of a classic unpublished novel. The response was overwhelming. Here, Boyd Tonkin, a former Booker judge and literary editor of The Independent, introduces the winner and the best of the runners-up in Opening Gambits

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Murdoch's library up for sale

The Beeb Is Reporting Novelist Dame Iris Murdoch's personal collection of almost 1,000 books will go on sale for between £125,000 and £150,000 on Thursday.

The books are being sold by the novelist's widower, Professor John Bayley, who said it was "painful" to sell his late wife's library but he had no room for them in his Oxford home.

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Marilyn Manson as Willy Wonka?

I'd heard rumors about a new, Tim Burton-directed version of Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory a couple years ago, but this is the first confirmation that it's in the works. Apparently, Dahl was never too keen on what Hollywood did to his work (Willy Wonka and The Witches), and his widow has been hesitant to give consent to new projects. She was, however, won over by Tim Burton, who she said, looked like Edward Scissorhands. The article also confirms a long-standing rumor that Marilyn Manson is very interested in playing the candy maker, Willy Wonka. Hoo boy!

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Shakespeare may have smoked pot

Clay pipes found at the site of Shakespeare's home offer a clue that the Bard may have lit up on occassion, according to a South African anthropologist. The only evidence offered aside from the pipes are images and references made in sonnets and plays. Other scholars dispute the anthropologist's work as being one toke over the line. More from the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

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