Law Libraries

Star Trek Cited by Texas Supreme Court

The following news almost makes up for how often I hide my head in shame of the decisions of the Texas courts. Especially when it comes to issues of science in schools, personal freedoms, and separation of church and state.

In the case of Robinson v. Crown Cork and Seal, the Texas Supreme Court has cited Mr. Spock. No, not Dr. Spock, the alleged parenting expert, but Mr. Spock, the Vulcan. Quoting from the opinion delivered on October 22, 2010, Justice Don R. Willett states:?

Read More http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2010/10/star-trek-cited-by-texas-supreme-court/#ixzz13hKKNLtE

Time is running short for county's trove of law books

It might seem old-fashioned, but her sentiment is echoed by what many in the legal community say: Poring over books makes it easier to collect information than Internet search tools, and provides a hands-on connection to the laws of our country.

"That's not possible on a computer," Clayton said. "The law could not exist without its books."

VS.

Nobody uses the books anymore," Commissioner Shannon Staub said at a recent budget meeting. "It's on the Internet, and forget the law library."

Full article here.

Lindsay Lohan needs to spend more time in law library

Cato senior fellow Walter Olsen says about Lohan: “She needs to be more careful in her legal research — too much time in bars and not enough in law libraries”

This was in response to Lohan’s Twitter assertions that her 90 days in jail were a violation of the UN Declaration of Human Rights and she also made mention of the unfair nature of federal sentencing guidelines. Both legal concepts she mentioned had no relevance to her case.

Full article in the Washington Post

Note to librarians: What is worse than information illiteracy mixed with poor online research?

Answer: Information illiteracy mixed with poor online research by Lindsay Lohan.

Law Librarians: An Untapped Resource for BI

Law firm management and attorneys have often overlooked an untapped resource: the library.

Law librarians bring skill, talent, creativity, and nonconventional resources to the firm, all of which greatly assist in serving the needs of clients and the firm. As the legal landscape has changed, by developing innovative ways to find and gather firm intelligence and information, law librarians have kept pace and provided a valuable resource to attorneys.

As competition for client representation increases, the need for valuable competitive business information and analysis in firms has drastically increased. Experienced law librarians are ideally situated to manage and deliver the quality intelligence that is critical in this economy. This has been the case for several years; a 2006 National Law Journal feature noted that law firm recruiting efforts were largely focused on the law librarians and other information professionals. See Jan Rivers, "More Firms Create CI Positions," National Law Journal, June 12, 2006. As attorneys continue to use law librarians as their primary resource for research, it becomes increasingly clear the important role law librarians play in the development of the firm.

Full article

Looking beyond the stacks: The law library as place

Traditionally, any discussion of the law library as place has begun—and more often than not ended—with the famous quotation from Christopher Columbus Langdell, former dean of the Harvard Law School, in which he analogized the role of the law library in the field of law to the role of a laboratory in the field of science. While certainly encouraging the now tired notion of learning to think like a lawyer, the problem with Langdell’s and much of the traditional treatment of the law library as place is the one-dimensional aspect that this approach creates. We are often left with the impression that the building is created solely for books and not for people. Lord Herbert Samuel summed up this traditional view of libraries in 1947 when he declared, “A library is thought in cold storage.”

Full article

April Comes, And Three Law Libraries Close in CT

"Sad Day" indeed... April Comes, And Three Law Libraries Close
Norwich courthouse law librarian Lori Sulmasy will spend a good deal of time over the next several weeks putting things in boxes. That includes periodicals and law books and such, 24,000 volumes in all, which will be sent to other libraries in the state.

That’s because the law library at the courthouse on Main Street closed its doors for good on April 1. So did courthouse law libraries in Milford and Willimantic, all victims of the state budget crunch.

Legal Sites Plan Revamps as Rivals Undercut Price

Westlaw and LexisNexis, the dominant services in the market for computerized legal research, will undergo sweeping changes in a bid to make it easier and faster for lawyers to find the documents they need.

The changes to the research services are a reaction by Westlaw and LexisNexis to lower-priced — sometimes free — rivals and arrive at a time when law firms are working to cut overhead. The two companies also want to cater to a younger generation of lawyers accustomed to slick Web services and the search interfaces presented by companies like Google and Microsoft.

Full story in the NYT

Painting stolen from historic law library

Painting stolen from historic law library
A valuable painting has been stolen from a library used by some of Scotland's most senior lawyers.

The watercolour was taken over the New Year from the historic Signet Library in Edinburgh, home of the country's legal establishment.

DOJ Pays $15M for Legal Research, Including $4M for Pacer

An open records advocate contends that a free source of legal documents could eventually save the federal government $1 billion, and he offers the Justice Department as Exhibit A.

A freedom of information request by Carl Malamud reveals that Justice Department paid more than $4 million in 2009 for access to the Pacer electronic filing system, according to the Wired blog Threat Level.

Full piece at ABA Journal

Holiday Book Art

I wanted to share our holiday book art project with you - we made a tree using bound law reviews (favoring red and green colors, of course) and bound Utah Digests. We also used discarded publications to make interesting shapes, including the tree topper. Check out our photos HERE

Do you know of any other libraries that are featuring holiday book art? I'd love to see photos.

Thanks!
Mari Cheney
Reference Librarian

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