Law Libraries

Law librarians archive New York State's regulatory history

“We combined our funding, our talents and our staff and finally got the project going,” Lee said.
Last month, they announced the availability of the open-access database: NYCRR Digital Archive, which contains pages from the “New York Codes, Rules and Regulations” from 1945 to 2001 in full-text digital format. This free resource allows researchers, librarians and lawyers to more easily research previous versions of New York regulations. Fifty users at one time can access the material.

“It took us that long to get together and get it done,” Lee said. “It’s something that is and has been well-received by the law library community.”

From Law librarians archive New York State's regulatory history - Buffalo - Buffalo Business First

The Samuelson Clinic releases "Is it in the Public Domain?" handbook - Berkeley Law

The Samuelson Clinic is excited to provide a
handbook, “Is it in the Public Domain?,” and accompanying
visuals. These educational tools help users to evaluate the
copyright status of a work created in the United States between
January 1, 1923 and December 31, 1977—those works that were
created before today’s 1976 Copyright Act. Many important
works—from archival materials to family photos and movies—were created during this time, and it can be
difficult to tell whether they are still under copyright.

The handbook walks readers though a series of
questions—illustrated by accompanying charts—to help readers
explore whether a copyrighted work from that time is in the
public domain, and therefore free to be used without
permission from a copyright owner.  Knowing whether a work
is in the public domain or protected by copyright is an
important first step in any decision regarding whether or
how to make use of a work.

From The Samuelson Clinic releases "Is it in the Public Domain?" handbook - Berkeley Law

PACER Survey Shows Rise in User Satisfaction

PACER has seen a sharp rise in overall user satisfaction since a comparable survey was conducted in 2009, with 90 percent of users saying they are satisfied or highly satisfied with the internet-based public case information system. That compares with 75 percent satisfaction with the overall user experience in the previous survey.

Full story:

Not familiar with PACER? Read about PACER here.

Dwight Opperman, key figure in Westlaw’s launch in 1970s, dies at age 89

Dwight Opperman, a Drake University law graduate who rose to the top job at West Publishing after starting work there as an editor and was a key figure in the company's development of the Westlaw online legal research site in the 1970s, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 89 years old.

“He was instrumental in leading West from a book publisher and moving into electronic publishing,” former West executive Grant Nelson told the Star Tribune. “Dwight had the vision that there was something else on the horizon. He really felt in his core that West Publishing was providing a vital service to the courts, to the legal system and to the country, and he took great pride in that.”

Full piece at the ABA Journal

Justice Scalia Writes Guide for Interpreting the Law


Interview with Scalia on the PBS News Hour about his new book - Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts

LexisNexis Announces LexisNexis Digital Library

Agreement with OverDrive creates customized eBook lending and management service offering the largest collection of electronic books for legal professionals Full story

Old-School Prisoner Wants Books, Not Westlaw

Old-School Prisoner Wants Books, Not Westlaw
Since 1989 a prisoner has been serving time in an Ohio state prison for rape, kidnapping, felonious assault and aggravated assault convictions. Frustrated that the prison library replaced law books with computer access to Westlaw, her has sued the prison, requesting $80,000 in compensatory damages and up to $200,000 in punitive damages for the violation of his constitutional right to a law library.

SOPA shelved until consensus is found

Controversial online piracy bill shelved until 'consensus' is found
House Oversight Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) said early Saturday morning that Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) promised him the House will not vote on the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) unless there is consensus on the bill.

"While I remain concerned about Senate action on the Protect IP Act, I am confident that flawed legislation will not be taken up by this House," Issa said in a statement. "Majority Leader Cantor has assured me that we will continue to work to address outstanding concerns and work to build consensus prior to any anti-piracy legislation coming before the House for a vote."

Everything Must Go From Law Libraries

Everything Must Go From Law Libraries

It's not fair to say that area law schools, libraries, historical preservation societies and other groups interested in North Carolina law and Guilford County history are circling like vultures around the remains of the law library at the Guilford County Courthouse in Greensboro – which recently closed its doors due to funding cuts and other considerations. However, it is fair to say there's a great deal of interest among those groups as to who ends up with the library's contents.


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