Legal Issues

A dark day for the future of books

A dark day for the future of books
If the Justice Department prevails with its antitrust lawsuit, the decision might have unintended negative consequences for those who write, publish, sell and enjoy e-books. The government's intention to protect consumers could end up backfiring on consumers by harming retailers, authors and publishers.

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing is a series of posts from Freedom To Tinker. You might like to read Contract hacking and community organizing: "This is a game of chicken that the publisher cannot win. If the authors feel strongly and get their gumption together, they will prevail. The best course for publishers is to avoid playing this game of chicken, by adjusting their copyright contracts to fit the progress of open-access policies in the 21st century. I believe that the good nonprofits (such as ACM and IEEE) are heading in this direction, and Usenix is already there."

Sunday Dialogue: Books in a Digital Age

Letters to the Editor of the NYT about the DOJ lawsuit against publishers.

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S. Portland librarian wins suit, allowed to run for school board

South Portland Board of Education member Karen Callaghan has won a lawsuit with the city over a personnel policy that bars municipal employees from running for the board.

Callaghan, a part-time librarian for the city, and Burt Edwards, sued the city in Cumberland County Superior Court last year.

In 2010, the city changed its personnel policy to prohibit municipal employees from running for the Board of Education. The ban previously applied to City Council seats.

Full article

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Making Laws More Public

Carl Malamud, government transparency advocate and president of public.resource.org believes safety standards should be easily accessible to all citizens for free. Yet many of these standards -- from the design of bicycle helmets to water treatment components to hazmat suits – are the copyrighted creation of the industry organizations that have promulgated them. So Malamud has ponied up the dough to purchase exactly 73 of these standards, which he will publish online, copyright or no copyright. Full piece
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The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

Essay at NPR

The next cyber security bill is even worse than SOPA

The next cyber security bill is even worse than SOPA
Just when you thought it was safe to go out on the InterWebs comes a new effort by Congress to put a snoop on every cellphone and two spies in every cable modem. Contrary to what you may have read, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act is not SOPA II. But in many ways, it's worse.

Justice Dept. Sues Apple and Publishers Over E-Book Pricing; 3 Publishers Settle

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., center, leads a news conference describing a lawsuit in which the Justice Department charges Apple and book publishers with raising e-book prices. Full article in the NYT

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