Legal Issues

Sacramento Public Library whistleblower settles suit for $343,000

Sacramento Public Library whistleblower settles suit for $343,000
The clerk who blew the whistle on a Sacramento Public Library Authority kickback scheme that sent three people to prison settled her retaliation lawsuit against the agency for $343,000, it was disclosed Monday.

Lawsuit dismissed against 'Cups of Tea' author

Lawsuit dismissed against 'Cups of Tea' author
A U.S. District Court judge has rejected every claim presented by plaintiffs who said they were deceived when they shelled out $15 for Greg Mortenson's book, "Three Cups of Tea," assuming the contents were entirely true.

A dark day for the future of books

A dark day for the future of books
If the Justice Department prevails with its antitrust lawsuit, the decision might have unintended negative consequences for those who write, publish, sell and enjoy e-books. The government's intention to protect consumers could end up backfiring on consumers by harming retailers, authors and publishers.

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing

Copyright in Scholarly Publishing is a series of posts from Freedom To Tinker. You might like to read Contract hacking and community organizing: "This is a game of chicken that the publisher cannot win. If the authors feel strongly and get their gumption together, they will prevail. The best course for publishers is to avoid playing this game of chicken, by adjusting their copyright contracts to fit the progress of open-access policies in the 21st century. I believe that the good nonprofits (such as ACM and IEEE) are heading in this direction, and Usenix is already there."

Jane Litte explains the DoJ suit very well, and I have a couple of points to add

Publishing consultant Mike Shatzkin has this blog post: Jane Litte explains the DoJ suit very well, and I have a couple of points to add

Sunday Dialogue: Books in a Digital Age

Letters to the Editor of the NYT about the DOJ lawsuit against publishers.

S. Portland librarian wins suit, allowed to run for school board

South Portland Board of Education member Karen Callaghan has won a lawsuit with the city over a personnel policy that bars municipal employees from running for the board.

Callaghan, a part-time librarian for the city, and Burt Edwards, sued the city in Cumberland County Superior Court last year.

In 2010, the city changed its personnel policy to prohibit municipal employees from running for the Board of Education. The ban previously applied to City Council seats.

Full article

The e-book wars: Who is less evil, Amazon or book publishers?

Article discussing agency, Amazon, and publishers.

Full article: The e-book wars: Who is less evil, Amazon or book publishers?

Article was mentioned in this article: Who Cares If Amazon Becomes an E-book Monopoly?

Making Laws More Public

Carl Malamud, government transparency advocate and president of public.resource.org believes safety standards should be easily accessible to all citizens for free. Yet many of these standards -- from the design of bicycle helmets to water treatment components to hazmat suits – are the copyrighted creation of the industry organizations that have promulgated them. So Malamud has ponied up the dough to purchase exactly 73 of these standards, which he will publish online, copyright or no copyright.

Full piece

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

The DOJ E-Book Lawsuit: Is It 1934 All Over Again?

Essay at NPR

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