Librarians

Librarian holds the title of Jeopardy champion and set several world weightlifting records

Not your average librarian Far from the soft-spoken, matronly librarians of yore, Savannah-born Carolyn Goolsby on paper seems more like a character from a fantasy novel than the approachable Fort McMurray Public Library director she is.

A world-record setter for weightlifting, a crafter of homemade mozzarella and beer and a former Jeopardy champion — yes, Alex Trebek is as nice as he seems — Goolsby could be a contender for most interesting person in the world.

The proud owner of a red Swingline stapler (the sign of a true Office Space fan), she holds a masters in Library Science from the University of Maryland and a bachelors in Music and Voice Performance with a double major in Theory and Composition, Goolsby says she is professionally in her ideal position.

89-year-old librarian spreads passion for books

Great grandparents love telling stories about treks to one-room school houses on 20-below mornings.

But as far as we know, only one great grandma is still making the trip.

At age 89, Ruth Boldan is still a volunteer librarian at the under-heated, over-stuffed 1890s school house that is now home to the Hazel Dell Library.

Dale Askey Support Facebook Page

Attention Librarians and Library Lovers: We Need Your Support!

Dale Askey is an Associate University Librarian at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. He is being sued for $4,000,000 by Edwin Mellen Press because he critiqued the quality of the information they produce. If Mellen wins the case, the professional right to academic freedom possessed by librarians, professors and others in the academic community will be in jeopardy. Let’s spread word about the injustice that Dale Askey is facing, and let’s not let one company’s interest in profiteering outweigh our need for academic freedom.

To show your support for Dale Askey, please visit the Facebook support page we created. You can find more information about the lawsuit on the page and updates will be provided as they arise. Be sure to “like” the page and ask all of your librarian colleagues to “like” it as well. The more supporters the page receives, the more likely a major news media company will present this issue on radio or television. Here is the page link:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Dont-Punish-Dale-Librarian-Being-Sued/313371185432030

The Reanimation Library

Inside an old box factory in Brooklyn, N.Y., there are shelves upon shelves of discarded texts -- bizarre how-to manuals, grossly outdated atlases, back number encyclopedias.

It sounds like a place where old books go to die. But at the Reanimation Library, these paper orphans are getting a second life.

"Most of the books I collect would be considered useless, and most libraries would have taken them out of circulation," said Andrew Beccone, a New York City resident and founder of the Reanimation Library. "But you can show their continued relevance by pointing to the visual material."

Read more: http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/article/Reanimation-founder-to-speak-at-Ferguson-Librar...

LISTen: An LISNews.org Program -- Episode #232

Welcome back! After hopefully debugging a problem with feed generation that has possibly left subscribers hanging for about five weeks, we have a new episode. Previous episodes remain available for manual download and an experimental initiative is underway to additionally deposit copies with the Internet Archive, California's digital virtual library.

In light of the Dale Askey and Jeffrey Beall cases in Canada for libel, we talk in this episode about the dangerous possibility of challenges erupting in those cases to the notion of librarianship actually being a profession. The case is laid out as to how librarianship may not necessarily be considered truly a profession in contemporary terms on a level with medicine or law. Following that a new miscellany is presented and the show is concluded with USDA Radio's Susan Carter presenting a feature about the Agriculture Department's Rural Utilities Service working to bridge the Digital Divide in parts of the United States.

Related links:

Download here (MP3) (Ogg Vorbis) (Free Lossless Audio Codec), or subscribe to the podcast (MP3) to have episodes delivered to your media player. We suggest subscribing by way of a service like gpodder.net. The purchasing requests list can be found via our Amazon Wishlist.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.

18:15 minutes (10.46 MB)
mp3

Colorado Librarian Jeffrey Beall Slapped With Canadian Libel Claim

Colleen Flaherty reports at Inside Higher Ed that the Canadian Centre for Science and Education has hit Beall with a libel claim over his Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2013. This follows the recently recognized case of Dale Askey reported on by Library Journal, The Hamilton Spectator, Macleans, and Inside Higher Ed.

(h/t Glyn Moody)

Tumblarians

Nice list of "Tumblarians" (libraries and librarians with Tumblr accounts) from the Lifeguard Librarian, Kate TKasik. And here's her "how to create a Tumblr account" article.

Librarian's Research Focuses on Child Stars of Viral Videos

Interesting story from Rutgers University about an academic librarian who is pursuing a study of what happens to children in popular YouTube videos after their fifteen minutes/seconds of fame have ended.

Child-centric viral videos are turning young stars into internet sensations, but a Rutgers–Camden researcher warns against exploiting the children by cashing in on the fame.

“We just don’t know what kinds of affect this internet fame will have on these children in the future,” says Katie Elson Anderson, a librarian at the Paul Robeson Library on the Rutgers–Camden campus.

Anderson has examined the implications of the YouTube videos for her essay, “Configuring Childhood on the Web,” which is featured as a chapter in the book Portrayals of Children in Popular Culture: Fleeting Images (Lexington Books, 2012).

“Viral videos starring children have become a real phenomenon,” Anderson says. “David After Dentist,” the video in which a father taped his young son dealing with the effects of anesthesia, has been viewed more than 117 million times. “Charlie Bit My Finger,” in which a baby boy bites his big brother, has been seen more than 511 million times.

“I think the early videos — the ones with Charlie and David, for example — were organic,” Anderson says. “People didn’t really know that these videos could become viral. They just posted videos for family. Now, it seems that people are posting videos because they are seeing the fame that can result from it. There’s actually money to be made.”

Jail librarian gives captive audience a chance to read

Officer Selina Sanchez, who manages the library at the Douglas County Correctional Center, receives hundreds of requests, called “kites,” for books, and for some inmates, she makes personal selections. “Selina might be the most popular person in the jail,” says her boss, Barb Glaser.

Full article

The librarian should remain at the center

The Future of Librarians in an EBook World

While the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation is funding tech initiatives such as a smartphone app for the Washington State Library, the focus on the human element is key, according to Sue Coliton, the foundation’s vice president. “We believe it’s not either/or,” says Coliton. “The technology opportunities are additive. The librarian should remain at the center.”

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