Latino Librarian Dispels Stodgy Image

Yahoo News has a

on Martin Gomez, executive director of the
Brooklyn Public Library. It\'s a neat little story on our
image, the proffesion, and how things are

\"\"In a crowd of librarians, I stand out,\" he
said. \"The old ideas about librarians is slowly changing.
[People of color] are less than 3 percent in the


Librarian\'s Lao Tzu

Someone suggested The Librarian\'s Lao Tzu by Andy Barnett.

\"The Tao te Ching is an ancient book of wisdom, the well spring of a great religion, Taoism. It has been translated many times, by such literary luminaries as Ursula K. LeGuin, Stephen Mitchell and Alan Watts. I do no possess even a modicum of their literary talent, poetic ability or knowledge of Eastern religions. I do have one advantage that they do not. Lao Tzu, the reputed author of the work, was a librarian. This is the first attempt by a fellow librarian to translate the Tao te Ching.\"


What is librarianship?

Jud Barry writes:

What is librarianship? Your readers might be interested in the Defining Librarianship website, which is looking for the common ground of librarianship-a source of ethical behavior-on which all librarians stand.

All librarians: whether a modified librarian whose body-pierced unconventionality need not mean a lack of professionalism, an anarchist librarian preparing to catalog the revolution, a librarian in frankly pro-censorship China, or a librarian for the equally (but differently) pro-censorship Concerned Women for America.

They can go to Defining Librarianship and help find the common ground.


The Librarian\'s Image, Unrevised

Sunday\'s NY
has a nice Story from Karen Schneider on the
image of the library profession.

\"Call me a loser,
but I\'ve actually read the same book twice in the same
week, just because I liked it, then took time to discuss it
with friends. \"


Naperville has top library in nation again

Our own Thomas Hennen made it into the Chicago Sun-Times yesterday in a little Story. Hennen\'s American Public Library Ratings was released and The Naperville Public Libraries, in IL, was the top of the heap. This is the third straight rating as the best library in the country for its size for Naperville.

You can also check out the full ratings online at the HAPLR 2000 Ratings Page


Forever in blue jeans

Someone sent in this Story from Things must be pretty boring in Neenah, because the Library Board voted 4-3 last week against the implementation of a dress and grooming code. It says the Library Board struggled to develop an acceptable and enforceable code. The first proposal specified 22 items of inappropriate clothing, including underwear worn as outerwear. Is there a fashion trend starting at the libraries in WI?

\"The consideration of a dress code has generated diverse opinions among library employees and has led to the resignation of one circulation clerk.\"


Mapping Information

Cliif Urr writes \"This interesting article, referred to from the web log, seems to invite professional communicators to undertake tasks that seem virtually identical to what librarians do. Also, distinguishes \"maps\" from \"stories\" as a way to organize information, and claims \"maps\" are supplanting stories for this task. Sample text: \"From a postmodernist perspective, we might instead begin to value the idea that technical communicators\' talents lie not in their skills at taking (and simplifying) dictation but in constructing novel and useful (if contingent) structures in fields of information. In other words, business and technical communicators do not write documentation or author reports, but make maps. What better job than mapmaker in an era when information is portrayed to users as a confusing, jumbled tsunami of data?\"

Read It Here


Librarians Ignore the Value of Stories

Here\'s an interesting essay from The Chronicle written by Wayne A. Wiegand,a professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

He says people go to the library to find stories to read. Folks are looking for material that inspires them or affirms their identities. Mr. Wiegand says the problem is librarians have little knowledge of why people read what they do, therefore librarians tend to lack a deeper understanding of how libraries serve some readers. This is a missed opportunity to show evidence to state legislatures and other sources of financial support that spending money on stories is important. Librarians are also often not able to help people find the right story to read and don\'t develop enough programs to connect readers to one another. He puts part of the blame on library and information-science programs, that have ignored the literature on reading usually undervalue the reading of stories.

What about you, do you know why people come in, what they are reading and why?


On the Offensive ??

Mary Ann Meyers wrote this on the recent attacks from Dr. Laura and others on the ALA.

public libraries, the ALA, and librarians still must find an
way to let people know the who and why of the public library
but we won\'t be able to do that until we better establish our own
understanding of ourselves. I also believe that we should be
prudent in
where we choose our battlegrounds. We can be \"right as rain\" and
\"bearers of the Truth\" in our own minds, feel tremendously
about what we do as public servants (as we understand [?] that
description)--and gain a lot more foes than supporters.


News librarians roles expanding

E&P Online has a Story that talks about News librarians. They say news librarians are much better appreciated these days, and their roles are expanding. The skills the librarians possess are becoming increasingly important. Journalists run the risk of smothering in the information overload, librarians/news researchers help make sense of it all. Now why can\'t other librarians get this kind of respect?

A new book is out that should be of some use to journalists who want to be better skilled at using the Internet as an integral part of their reporting. \"Super Searchers In The News\" (Information Today Inc.), written by Paula Hane and edited by Reva Basch, takes the approach of interviewing 10 experts in using the Internet as a news research tool.



Subscribe to Librarians