Librarians

Librarians Ignore the Value of Stories

Here\'s an interesting essay from The Chronicle written by Wayne A. Wiegand,a professor at the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.


He says people go to the library to find stories to read. Folks are looking for material that inspires them or affirms their identities. Mr. Wiegand says the problem is librarians have little knowledge of why people read what they do, therefore librarians tend to lack a deeper understanding of how libraries serve some readers. This is a missed opportunity to show evidence to state legislatures and other sources of financial support that spending money on stories is important. Librarians are also often not able to help people find the right story to read and don\'t develop enough programs to connect readers to one another. He puts part of the blame on library and information-science programs, that have ignored the literature on reading usually undervalue the reading of stories.

What about you, do you know why people come in, what they are reading and why?

On the Offensive ??

Mary Ann Meyers wrote this on the recent attacks from Dr. Laura and others on the ALA.


I
think
public libraries, the ALA, and librarians still must find an
effective
way to let people know the who and why of the public library
profession;
but we won\'t be able to do that until we better establish our own
understanding of ourselves. I also believe that we should be
prudent in
where we choose our battlegrounds. We can be \"right as rain\" and
the
\"bearers of the Truth\" in our own minds, feel tremendously
passionate
about what we do as public servants (as we understand [?] that
description)--and gain a lot more foes than supporters. -- Read More

News librarians roles expanding

E&P Online has a Story that talks about News librarians. They say news librarians are much better appreciated these days, and their roles are expanding. The skills the librarians possess are becoming increasingly important. Journalists run the risk of smothering in the information overload, librarians/news researchers help make sense of it all. Now why can\'t other librarians get this kind of respect?

A new book is out that should be of some use to journalists who want to be better skilled at using the Internet as an integral part of their reporting. \"Super Searchers In The News\" (Information Today Inc.), written by Paula Hane and edited by Reva Basch, takes the approach of interviewing 10 experts in using the Internet as a news research tool.

What Happened to the Core Values?

Tim Wojcik who manages the
librarians\'
section of
About.com has
posted his recent interview with Janet
Swan Hill and GraceAnne DeCandido about the Core
Values task force.

\"For several years the library community has
asked itself to identify its core values. After the 1999
Congress on Professional Education recommended
that librarians core values be clarified, American Library
Association (ALA) president Sarah Long appointed a
task force to draft a core values statement for ALA
Council to review and ratify. The task force ultimately
produced five drafts of a core values statement. The fifth
draft was presented to ALA Council at the Annual
Conference in Chicago last July. It\'s a remarkable story
- this statement of core values in its journey to Chicago
and beyond. Beyond, because a statement of core
values has yet to be ratified by ALA Council. \"

Believe any fact can be found on the Internet?

I was most supirised by This Letter on The CBC. Maybe things are different in Canada? I can literally see it from here, and it doesn\'t look any different, eh?

\"Librarians have come to believe any fact can be found on the Internet. But, like a piece of Swiss cheese, the Internet is riddled with holes. Library budgets have been slashed and the Internet is offered as the low-cost saviour. Stories abound about finding mountains of information on any topic within minutes of logging on. However, the Internet is also clogged with dated info, misleading info, false info, and downright off the wall info. And Jeeves couldn\'t help you separate the wheat from the chafe even if you asked him. -- Read More

Gone without a sound

Story from North Dakota that ends the trouble they were having with the library director in Fargo. He quit, but they gave hime quite the golden parachute – $62,244 – including health insurance and retirement benefits, plus $10,000 in attorney fees and $6,000 in relocation expenses.

\"“It’s with regret that a qualified librarian and a good man’s reputation has been damaged here, but it’s important for us to grow and move on as a board.” said Library Board President Virginia Dambach.

The comment drew a few quiet, sarcastic remarks from some people attending the meeting, many of whom were past and present employees of the library.

Now they are thinking the next director should Not be a librarian. -- Read More

I\'m rubber, you\'re glue ...

Brian writes \"In a Chicago Tribune article on the horrors of looking \"matronly,\" an image consultant is quoted as saying:

\"I don\'t think it requires an age ... it\'s an attitude. When people no longer have any sexual zing. It\'s the funky librarian look, Mumsy, skirts full, eyewear outdated, a missing sexual energy, an attachment to the past.\"

chicagotribune.com has the full Story\"

Urbanites are a funny bunch, so preocupied with what others think of them, now that I think about it, so are \"We\".

Stereotypes of the Library Lady

Here is a cute article from the DesMoines Register about the old lady who said Shhh!! all the time.\"The thousands of books were well past their prime and so was the woman who ran the place. Miss Library Lady was about 99 years old, wore her hair in a tight gray bun and looked at you over the edge of her half-glasses. Her vocabulary amounted to little more than \"No talking\" and \"Be quiet\" and \"Shhhh.\" -- Read More

Early black librarian\'s efforts recalled

Bob Cox suggested this. courier-journal.com has a Nice Story on Thomas Fountain Blue Sr., the first librarian of the old Western Colored branch of the Louisville Free Public Library in 1905, he was the only black librarian in the country at a library with an all-black staff.

\"EDUCATION WAS everything to him,\" Hutchins said. \"It was always most important.\" The free presentation is one of five programs planned this fall at branch libraries. The programs are designed to preview The Encyclopedia of Louisville, which the University Press of Kentucky plans to publish in October. -- Read More

More on the strike

Two more articles on the strike in Ohio. One on how it is affecting contruction work, and another on the drop of circulation numbers.

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