Librarians

Work for the love of it!

Someone writes \"Would you work for free?

Full Story \"

Yvonne has worked at her library for 28 years and been the librarian since 1986. She is old enough to retire but she loves her work. She loves it so much, it turns out, that she decided to quit the job. By doing so, it freed up money for books and magazines.

The Top Librarian Personalities On The Web

The LISNews.com Top Librarian
Personalities on the Web
what follows is the first annual LISNews.com Top Librarian Personalities
on the Web.
I’ll modestly state up front that I didn’t count votes
for myself, it just didn\'t seem right to have myself on a list I was building
.

This list is also appearing in Online Magazine soon in a much expanded format. What follows is just the list of names. -- Read More

New Twin Cities bookstore redefines \'hard sell\'

Bob Cox passed along This One on a new bookstore in Minneapolis they say is hard to find, and once you get there it\'s almost impossible to buy anything.

The owner retired recently as curator of the University of Minnesota\'s James Ford Bell Library, and these really are her books, which is why selling is tough.

\" \'What shall I do with all my books?\' was the question; and the answer, \'Read them,\' sobered the questioner. \'But if you cannot read them, at any rate handle them and, as it were, fondle them. Peer into them. Let them fall open where they will. Read on from the first sentence that arrests the eye. Then turn to another. Make a voyage of discovery, taking soundings of uncharted seas. Set them back on their shelves with your own hands. Arrange them on your own plan, so that if you do not know what is in them, you at least know where they are. If they cannot be your friends, let them at any rate be your acquaintances. If they cannot enter the circle of your life, do not deny them at least a nod of recognition.\"

Guerilla Warfare and Librarian Spies

Lee Hadden writes: \" The Wall Street Journal has a front page article in the Feb 26th issue
by Chip Cummins \"A Mistaken Shooting Puts Army War Games Under Tough
Spotlight,\" and refers to war games played in central North Carolina in the
mythical country of \"Pineland.\" Army teams go in to either support or
subvert the mythical republic by meeting with locals, some of who
participate in the games as either pro-Pinelands or anti-Pinelands agents.
The local librarian in Ramseur, NC, carries secret coded messages tucked
away in a copy of a Dr. Seuss book. \"Yes, Sam I am, I can topple Pineland,
yes I can...\"
In the first horrible accident in a number of years, several soldiers
thought the local policeman who caught them riding in the back of a local
pickup truck with a local supporter was also in with the game, and the
armed soldiers were killed when they resisted arrest.\"

Librarian\'s Book Club

Troy Johnson writes \"Bibliofuture.com has a \"Librarian\'s Book Club.\" The Librarian\'s Book Club is a group to read and discuss books that are about libraries and the library profession. Every two months new books are selected to be read. The club was started in July of 2001 and is on it\'s tenth book and has 160 members. Members discuss the books via listserv. New books have been selected for March - April and we welcome new members. \"

There is also a nice section on eBook Readers and Libraries.

Librarian Calls for Screening Public Access to Nuclear Documents

Another twist in the ongoing \"access to information\" stories, this time The Chronicle of Higher Ed says a documents librarian at the State University of New York at Oswego sent out an e-mail message urging fellow librarians to screen requests for Nuclear Regulatory Commission documents.

This time the the U.S. Government Printing Office said the request threatened to restrict access to public documents

Coin toss to determine librarian\'s fate

News From Canada where a library has determined that a part-time library technician has the same classification and seniority as another employee. The library is going through the process of amalgamating several libraries, and some jobs have been made redundant.
The tie-breaker, as set out in the union agreement, is the flip of a coin. She has hired a lawyer to check into the seniority issue and hasn\'t decided what she will do if she\'s forced to make the coin toss.


\"A coin toss I associate with sports,\'\' said the woman who works in the fine arts section. \"I\'m totally offended by it. Even if I win the toss, it will make me sick.\'\'

Technology changes role of librarian

Here\'s Another \"Technology changes the role of the librarian\" story we\'ve been seeing all over the place lately. The stories are no doubt goof PR for all of us.

\"The fact we offer Internet usage brings in a totally different clientele,\" Chaudoin said Wednesday. \"We have about 25 to 30 people in here using computers this morning.\"

More On NY Librarian Murder Trial

The NYPost Is Covering that murder trial, as only
the post can.

\"Louis Hubrecht, 67, admits to pumping six bullets
into Barbara Kenna, 69, a beloved teacher-librarian
from PS 2 in Manhattan.

With respect to the defense and their argument of
self-defense, it is about as credible as saying
Canadians can\'t skate. \"

Digital age turned librarians into information scientists

Mr. Stuff sent over This Story that says The Internet has made things a little more complicated for us.

\"We used to be able to tell people, \'We don\'t have that,\' \" she said. \"We can\'t do that anymore.\"

They say the Web has transformed the lives of traditional librarians, and we now now find ourselves seeking answers to questions on electronic databases, intranets and the less-than-organized World Wide Web.
Seems to be a bit of a \"we\'re overwhelmed\" tone to this one.

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