Librarians

Poe/try Celebration by the StandUp Librarian

Los Angeles librarian is all over the maps

Creason has heard it all. "One I get constantly is, 'Do you have maps of the secret tunnels dug under L.A.?' .... They are secret tunnels and they do not appear on maps," he says.

Amid the stacks of history and genealogy volumes, and the drawers of microfilm, Creason, 65, leaves no doubt about where his heart lies: maps.

Tall and affable, he has helped preserve a street-by-street history of Los Angeles.

"I love to answer map questions," says Creason, who has worked at the Central Library for 32 years and became map librarian in 1989.

Public libraries represent excellent value propositions

Over on his Cites & Insights site Walt Crawford has pulled out a selection from his latest [PDF] Cites & Insights where he points out what an excellent value proposition public libraries represent... "...quite apart from being at the heart of healthy communities large and small. Public libraries typically yield several dollars in benefits for every dollar in expenditures. Public libraries also need better funding to do better work - and unless they have separate funding agencies, must compete for that funding with other agencies at the local and state level."

His new book, Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give You Back Four is available in three versions, from Lulu, http://lulu.com. You might go first to the Lulu home page and look for a coupon code, then search for "Give Us a Dollar" to get to the books.

Librarian Starbucks Diet

A Law Librarian in Virginia lost 80 pounds eating almost exclusively at Starbucks. Story also mentions that she is a kidney donor. Initially when she wanted to donate a kidney doctors said she was too heavy. After she lost 40 pounds she was able to be a kidney donor.

Full piece

Ask a librarian, and then listen

Nice! ...in archives around the world lie vast repositories of information printed in ink on rustling onionskin, and images recorded on wrinkled photographic paper. As they say in the south, you can't get there from here—you have to find a car, drive out to the research facility, pull on some white cotton gloves, and page through the stuff yourself. No matter how detailed the library's finding aid (a document that lists everything in a particular collection), you may need to leaf through page after page to find whatever you're after. But make sure you're sitting down, because when you find it, the rush can take your head off.

OH County Library Hires Firm to Study Employees’ Compensation

The Public Library of Youngstown and Mahoning County has hired a Cleveland consulting firm to study the pay and benefits of library employees compared with those of their peers doing similar work elsewhere.

That firm, The Human Resource Department, will be paid between $12,000 and $13,500 for the compensation study, depending on its scope.

The services and personnel committee of the library’s board of trustees will meet at 3:30 p.m. Thursday at the Poland library to discuss the library system’s compensation philosophy and the compensation study.

Story from The Youngstown Vindicator (interesting newspaper name!)

Warren Cty NJ Librarian Prepares for 60-mile Fundraising Bike Ride to Each Branch in County

Warren County NJ's rolling hills look more intimidating than scenic from mile 45 of a long training ride. Librarian TaraLynn Romagnoli has been climbing many of these hills via bicycle on her quest to train for a 60-mile fundraising ride to raise money for the Warren County Library according to NJ.com.

"The terrain is a little tough, especially since I'm not an experienced cyclist, but I'm enjoying the challenge and can see myself improving every day,” Romagnoli said. “I am expecting to have a great ride."

Romagnoli is cycling across the county to each branch of the Warren County Library to raise money for the new main library facility at 189 Route 519 in White Township.

This 60-mile ride, called the Ride to Read, is presented by the Friends of the Warren County Library Headquarters. The Friends hope to raise $5,000 in sponsorships to purchase furnishings, such as comfy armchairs for quiet reading, as well as diner booths and stools, an mp3-player jukebox, and a neon sign for a diner-themed teen section. Romagnoli hopes that these items will help to make this building a true community center for library users.

Helicopter Librarian

Although Helicopter Parents can be viewed negatively, not every characteristic is undesirable. Some Helicopter Parents return to land after they are sure their precious child is cruising at a safe and comfortable altitude. The latter, more moderate approach is ideal for Helicopter Librarians.

“Helicopter Librarians” can emulate the desirable traits of “Helicopter Parents.” Additionally, the term “Helicopter Librarian” sounds sufficiently lofty.

The main difference between great librarians and Helicopter Librarians is that the former are focused on providing excellent service whereas the Helicopter Librarians are committed to building radically great relationships that students are comfortable with, similar to their relationships with their Helicopter Parents.

Full article (Library Journal)

Librarians are Completely Awesome

Can't do much better than "Librarians are Completely Awesome" for a subject can I?
"Here's the thing about librarians: they are the only people I know who are incredibly excited TO DO YOUR WORK FOR YOU. "

Nazi Era Book Left in Illinois Library Book Drop

From The Chicago Sun-Times: LaGrange Park Public Library officials are brimming with curiosity over who dropped off a rare book stamped “Secret!” from notorious Nazi Commander Hermann Goring, which is now under study at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

“It’s a great mystery,” library director Dixie Conkis said. “We had the book in our possession for a while not knowing quite what to do with it, but felt that because it was marked ‘secret’ it was probably a rather important book.”

The book, “1938-1941: Vier Jahre, Hermann Goring-Werke,” likely was left in the library’s book drop. It easily could have been discarded if not for Ursula Stanek, circulation services director, who grew up in Mannheim, Germany. The book sat on her desk for several weeks in the spring until she noted the inside cover was stamped “Geheim!” meaning “Secret!” with letterhead from Goring, the Nazi state secrete police commander.

Thanks to the librarians, the book now has a permanent home in Washington DC's Holocaust Museum, which had only previously had a reprinted copy.

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