Librarians

Colorado Librarian Jeffrey Beall Slapped With Canadian Libel Claim

Colleen Flaherty reports at Inside Higher Ed that the Canadian Centre for Science and Education has hit Beall with a libel claim over his Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2013. This follows the recently recognized case of Dale Askey reported on by Library Journal, The Hamilton Spectator, Macleans, and Inside Higher Ed.

(h/t Glyn Moody)

Tumblarians

Nice list of "Tumblarians" (libraries and librarians with Tumblr accounts) from the Lifeguard Librarian, Kate TKasik. And here's her "how to create a Tumblr account" article.

Librarian's Research Focuses on Child Stars of Viral Videos

Interesting story from Rutgers University about an academic librarian who is pursuing a study of what happens to children in popular YouTube videos after their fifteen minutes/seconds of fame have ended.

Child-centric viral videos are turning young stars into internet sensations, but a Rutgers–Camden researcher warns against exploiting the children by cashing in on the fame.

“We just don’t know what kinds of affect this internet fame will have on these children in the future,” says Katie Elson Anderson, a librarian at the Paul Robeson Library on the Rutgers–Camden campus.

Anderson has examined the implications of the YouTube videos for her essay, “Configuring Childhood on the Web,” which is featured as a chapter in the book Portrayals of Children in Popular Culture: Fleeting Images (Lexington Books, 2012).

“Viral videos starring children have become a real phenomenon,” Anderson says. “David After Dentist,” the video in which a father taped his young son dealing with the effects of anesthesia, has been viewed more than 117 million times. “Charlie Bit My Finger,” in which a baby boy bites his big brother, has been seen more than 511 million times.

“I think the early videos — the ones with Charlie and David, for example — were organic,” Anderson says. “People didn’t really know that these videos could become viral. They just posted videos for family. Now, it seems that people are posting videos because they are seeing the fame that can result from it. There’s actually money to be made.”

Jail librarian gives captive audience a chance to read

Officer Selina Sanchez, who manages the library at the Douglas County Correctional Center, receives hundreds of requests, called “kites,” for books, and for some inmates, she makes personal selections. “Selina might be the most popular person in the jail,” says her boss, Barb Glaser.

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The librarian should remain at the center

The Future of Librarians in an EBook World

While the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation is funding tech initiatives such as a smartphone app for the Washington State Library, the focus on the human element is key, according to Sue Coliton, the foundation’s vice president. “We believe it’s not either/or,” says Coliton. “The technology opportunities are additive. The librarian should remain at the center.”

Beyonce employs librarian to catalogue 50,000 hours of private home videos

Beyonce has reportedly hired a librarian to catalogue the reams of intimate footage of herself that she has secretly been amassing for almost ten years.

The 31-year-old singer is getting up to 50,000 hours of intimate home videos stored in a digital archive in a temperature-controlled room so she can access moments from her life at the touch of a button, the Sun reported.

School librarian completes Appalachian Trail

During the week she may look like an average elementary teacher and librarian, but in her spare time and during her summer vacations, Diane McCormick has dedicated herself to completing a hike of the Appalachian Trail. The trails stretch across 13 states and total 2,183 miles. Although she never intended on finishing the entire thing, she reached the impressive goal this past summer.

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5 Reasons Being a Librarian Is Stressful

Screwy Decimal:
Based on the responses and on my own experiences, I've broken down the big librarian stressors into 5 categories. These are not exhaustive, and they totally blend into one another, and really I just wanted to capitalize on the list format that is so popular with the media these days. Forgive me for being sloppy and derivative. Also forgive me, Twitter friends, for not including every response yet. There were SO many of them, and they were all relevant (and some were downright disturbing and/or hilarious). Five hours later, I am STILL getting them, and still trying to sift through them, so I will try to add more as the day goes on. However, there were a lot of common themes that were repeated, so it's my hope that I've covered the basic idea. Feel free to add yours in the comments! (And if you're really curious, take a look at the Tweets I've "favorited" on Twitter, it shows them all.)

Want a Stress-Free Career?

According to CNBC your job as a librarian is one of the least stressful professions.

It's number "9" in the top ten.

"You're working in a comfortable environment. Your job is to help people use services as best as possible. Given that environment, stress levels are low. What's the most stressful thing a librarian faces? Teenagers with a paper due and you don't have the books. It's not really your stress," says Tony Lee, publisher of CareerCast.com.

Plus, there are mandatory "quiet" rules in libraries and you're surrounded by books. Books don't talk back or criticize the job you're doing!

Hat tip to Screwy Decimal for the lead.

Yale Law Librarian Reopens Debate on the Origins of ‘The Whole Nine Yards’

The online debate has raged since Yale law librarian Fred Shapiro discovered an early reference that suggests a different origin for the phrase “the whole nine yards.”

Writing in the Yale Alumni Magazine, Shapiro said he had conducted an online search and found a variant, “the whole six yards,” in two articles published in Kentucky in 1912. He searched for the phrase after a neuroscience researcher discovered the variant in a 1921 article published in South Carolina.

Full article

See the comments to the article for smart ass comments about librarians.

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