Librarians

Absense of Sound --a Librarian's Story

From the July/August issue of the Saturday Evening Post a selection fron author N. West Moss's new story collection, focusing on a day in the life of a librarian at the Bryant Park NYPL .

N. West Moss was the winner of the Post’s 2015 Great American Fiction Contest for “Omeer’s Mangoes,” which, with “Absence of Sound,” appears in her first short-story collection, The Subway Stops at Bryant Park (Leapfrog Press, 2017). This story first appeared in Neworld Review. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Salon, McSweeney’s, and Brevity, among others.

What To Do With Memorial Tributes To Victims of Gun Violence

Dallas is among the cities where archivists are curating shrines that surfaced after tragedies. The question: How to preserve a part of history? Story from The New York Times.

The archive is not about what happened that night, but about “the outpouring of love from the citizens — from the world — that happened afterward,” said Jo Giudice, the director of Dallas’s public library system. Tributes surged into Dallas soon after a gunman opened fire during a protest last summer. Five officers — Lorne Ahrens, Michael Krol, Michael J. Smith, Brent Thompson and Patrick Zamarripa — were killed; the gunman died during a standoff.

The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project's Secrets

Her appointment was a victory for the women on the Hill. Though women were integral to the success of the Manhattan Project—scientists like Leona Woods and Mary Lucy Miller played central roles in the creation of the bomb—none occupied leadership positions. In this respect, Serber stood alone. As the head of the scientific library, she became the Manhattan Project’s de facto keeper of secrets, a position that soon saw her targeted for an FBI probe—and almost ended in her being fired from the project.
From The Librarian Who Guarded the Manhattan Project's Secrets - Atlas Obscura
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Bear is a novel about a lonely librarian in who enters into a sexual relationship with a bear

Bear is a novel by Canadian author Marian Engel, published in 1976. It won the Governor General's Literary Award the same year. It is Engel's fifth novel, and her most famous. The story tells of a lonely librarian in northern Ontario who enters into a sexual relationship with a bear. The book has been called "the most controversial novel ever written in Canada".[1]
From Bear (novel) - Wikipedia

Ukrainian Librarian Punished for Not Sticking to the Party Line

Interesting story from the New York Times last week.

MOSCOW — A Russian court on Monday sentenced a former director of the Library of Ukrainian Literature in Moscow to a four-year suspended prison term for inciting hatred toward Russians and embezzling public funds, in a case that her lawyers described as an attack on cultural figures with ties to Ukraine.

The court ruled that Natalia G. Sharina (whose library has since been closed) purchased anti-Russian books and other materials and put them on the library’s shelves to help Ukrainian nationalists get a foothold in Moscow. Her lawyers said that they would appeal the sentence in Russian courts and also seek redress in the European Court of Human Rights.

It's Out! This is What a Librarian Looks Like

From The Huffington Post news of the publication of This Is What a Librarian Looks Like by Kyle Cassidy.

Kudos to the authors and the participants! Tell us your thoughts about participating and the finished product in the comments below.

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House Votes to Limit Powers of First Black Librarian of Congress

From Black Press USA (but few other sources) comes news that limits the responsibilities and the tenure of the Librarian of Congress Dr. Carla Hayden.

The bill makes the head of the Copyright Office, the Register of Copyrights, a presidential appointment that would have to be confirmed by the Senate, rather than an appointment by the Librarian of Congress, as it has been since 1870. The bill also limits the position of Librarian of Congress to a ten-year term.

The previous Librarian of Congress, James Billington, served in the position for 28 years though he was a Russian scholar and not really am MLS.

Top 20 Library Scandals in Recent History

Hopefully these examples show how at times it’s worth turning our gaze inward to discover how we can do things better. That’s why, although there’s certainly plenty of cases of library patrons behaving badly — from hackers to politicians to exhibitionists (to say nothing about irresponsible authors) — the focus of this list is primarily on librarians, along with the government and vendors that we do business with. So then, in the spirit of those words from Alice Roosevelt Longworth, “If you can’t say something good about someone, sit here by me."
From Top 20 Library Scandals in Recent History – John Hubbard – Medium
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The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Is Looking for a Librarian

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, or “Rock Hall,” is best known for their annual selection of new inductees. But the museum also boasts an incredibly comprehensive library and archive chock full of scholarship and memorabilia, from photonegatives of Aretha Franklin in the studio to Jimi Hendrix’s handwritten ‘Purple Haze’ lyric sheet to a full drawer of Kid Rock posters.
From The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Is Looking for a Librarian - Atlas Obscura
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Libraries Teach the Difference Between Real News & Fake News

It's happening all around the country. Librarians are teaching patrons and students how to detect "fake news".

In Seattle WA: From King5 News.

In Kenosha WI: From Kenosha WI News

At Fordham U, NY: Fordham University Libraries

In LaSalle, IL: La Salle Public Library

Do you know of other libraries informing their patrons how to spot "fake news"? Let us know in the comments.

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