Making Openness My Business

I am still getting daily lessons on what it means to be an advocate for and practitioner of openness. Before I started my professional career I didn't recognize the perseverance needed, or the political savvy, or the tenacity of trusting your gut when it tells you that what you are doing is worth the worry that you are faced with a Sisyphean task well beyond your abilities. If you take anything away from this, know that you do not have to be a researcher to be an important advocate for openness, nor do you have to be an expert in the many facets of openness.

From The Winnower | Making Openness My Business


Andrew Carnegie, Librarian

Andrew Carnegie died in 1919, and I became a librarian in 2012. In many ways, Carnegie’s idea of the library still affects my working life today, as it does many others in the library profession. With a staggering largess, Carnegie conspired to shape the library—both physically and professionally—into a service model of dull efficiency and grinding productivity, thereby transforming the library according to his own capitalist view of industry and labor. The thousands of Carnegie libraries scattered across the US stand as a testament both to his dictatorial generosity and to his crushing vision of higher education as workforce development. In this post, I take a brief look at Andrew Carnegie and the connection points among his philanthropy, the library profession, and the anti-intellectual pro-business forces at work in today’s higher education.

From Andrew Carnegie, Librarian — Scott W. H. Young


A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Little wonder this extraordinary man has continually fascinated and served as inspiration to artists from Shakespeare and Ben Johnson to Derek Jarman and Damon Albarn.

Now, the intriguing and mysterious Dee, who survived the machinations of the late Tudor period only to die in poverty in 1608/9, is to be revealed to the public through his remarkable personal library for the first time in history.

From A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed | Culture24

Jessamyn West, Technology Lady

Let me just start by saying that Jessamyn West is kind of internet famous. She was one of the original moderators for the community blog Metafilter, which is like the civilized version of Reddit. She was recently contacted by the White House for her thoughts on their choice for the next Librarian of Congress. And she speaks internationally about the digital divide. Talking with Jessamyn is a little like being on a really fast ride at the Tunbridge Fair. In this interview, we sat in her kitchen in Randolph, Vermont, and talked about her passion for public libraries and the role of the modern librarian. We also talked about how different people manage their personal relationships with their personal computers. Welcome.

From Jessamyn West, Technology Lady — Medium


Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet

Sure, the Library of Alexandria burnt down — but libraries exist, great and small. They can and do offer programs and items that connect organizations with individuals (DOKLab in the Netherlands, Oak Park’s Idea Box, the Darien Library Catalog, just to name a few). True, libraries these days need to struggle for funding and increase advocacy, such as a convenient book burning.  Also true how we can clash among ourselves due to differing interests, priorities, or personalities. But if we learn to become and recognize quiet, however briefly in however a manner, we can improve library innovation and continue to inspire others as well as ourselves.

From Creativity, personalities, librarianship, and Susan Cain’s Quiet – A TTW Guest Post by Sarah Liberman | Tame The Web


Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

From Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing: Forum | KQED Public Media for Northern CA


Pedal Powered Libraries

Alicia M. Tapia's bicycle-based, pop-up free library in San Francisco, and similar efforts elsewhere, described in the blog of San Francisco based bike maker Public Bikes. Includes link to Alice M.Tapia's site,

The Political Librarian - Vol I Issue 1

Announcing Volume I, Issue 1 of The Political Librarian, our new journal at the intersection local libraries, public policy and tax policy.

We are interested in featuring new voices and lines of inquiry, and are interested in publishing opinion pieces, white papers, and peer reviewed works.  You are invited to contribute to Vol 2 Issue 1 for a March 2016 publication date.  Our editorial guidelines are posted for your review and consideration.

Thanks to our editorial team, including series editor Lindsay Sarin, and general editors Johnna Purcell and Rachel Korman.  We are proud to announce our editorial board

From The Political Librarian - Vol I Issue 1 | EveryLibrary


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