Libraries

Seattle Sorts Library Books Faster than New York? Fuhgeddaboudit



In the fourth annual “battle of the book sorters,” the giant mechanical sorter shared by the New York Public Library and the Brooklyn Public Library sorted 12,570 items in an hour, while a similar behemoth belonging to the King County Library System in Washington state sorted a mere 11,868.

Full article: http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/29/seattle-sorts-library-books-faster-than-new-york-fuhgeddaboudit/?_r=0

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The Architecture of American Literacy

Article from CityLab about Washington, DC's Spy Library proposed additions to the classic Carnegie Library. The request however was denied by District preservationists.

Across the nation, the libraries that Andrew Carnegie built have been transformed and reused as historical museums, city halls, art centers, and even bars and restaurants, sometimes by dramatic means.

It is a testament to Carnegie's philanthropic investment in cities—the largest in U.S. history—that so many of these buildings are still in use. Yet no one can say exactly how many are standing now.

"As far as I'm aware, the last person to conduct an inventory of Carnegie libraries was Theodore Jones, back in 1997," says Ron Sexton, librarian for the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Almost 20 years later, Jones's book, Carnegie Libraries Across America: A Public Legacy, still offers the best estimate to a question that may not have an exact answer.

Redefining What Discovery Means | Peer to Peer Review

A recent Ithaka report by Roger Schonfeld asks “Does Discovery Still Happen in the Library?” My immediate thought was “did it ever?” quickly followed by “why do we assume it should?”

http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2014/10/opinion/peer-to-peer-review/redefining-what-discovery-m...

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A Library Battle in the Cornhusker State

There’s a fight brewing in Omaha, Nebraska of all places. I say “of all places” because from a distance Omaha seems like a calm place. Maybe it’s all those Mutual of Omaha commercials I saw as a child. Omaha is reassuring.

Nevertheless, the mayor is fighting against the library of all places. I say “of all places” because who fights against the library? Do they ever win?

The mayor wants the library to give out the names and addresses of patrons to the police when they ask, which current policy in Omaha and most other public libraries doesn’t allow.

Full post here. (Annoyed Librarian)

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Letter: Make Park Ridge library users pay for the use of the library

Opinion piece in newspaper. Interesting to see the thought process of the public.

Excerpt: I say vote NO on the Park Ridge Public Library referendum!

I counted 28 computers at the library (some may have been for reference data) and not all were in use. To top it off, the library has already purchased iPads with games for use by children. When did the library become a teaching source? That’s what the schools are supposed to do.

Full letter:
http://parkridge.suntimes.com/2014/10/23/letter-make-park-ridge-library-users-pay-use-library/

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Mayor's Office proposes letting police check out library patron information

The Omaha Mayor’s Office would like law enforcement officials to be able to access personal information from Omahans’ library cards in emergencies, setting off a debate over patrons’ privacy.

Mayor Jean Stothert’s chief of staff, Marty Bilek, appeared before the Omaha Public Library’s board Thursday to ask for a change in the library’s policy.

The request stemmed from an incident in which Metropolitan Community College police spent hours trying to identify a belli­gerent, drunk man at the South Omaha Library.

He refused to give his name, and the only form of identification he had was a library card. But under current policy, library staff couldn’t tell officers his name.

http://www.omaha.com/news/metro/mayor-s-office-proposes-letting-police-check-out-library-pat...

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5 reasons you should have a library card

In his Search/Research blog, Google's research scientist Daniel Russell has this to say about using all the research tools at your disposal, the most important of which just may be the humble library card.

"One of the more powerful research tools you can have is a library card.

I’ve written about why libraries are great before, but this is worth repeating: A library card is instant access to a world of resources. Both offline AND online.

That might surprise you, but here are 5 reasons why you want a library card to be a great researcher."

Library Cloud Formations of the PAST and the FUTURE

From The Atlantic.

THE PAST

THE FUTURE

Books are still there. What do you think?

When robots join the library

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