Libraries

Happy 200th to the LOC

The Nando Times has a nice look at the Library of Congress, in Washington, D.C.

\"On April 24, 1800, President John Adams approved an appropriation of $5,000 to purchase \"such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress.\"

Books - mostly on history, economics and law - were ordered from London. They arrived in 1801 and were shelved in the new U.S. Capitol. The collection consisted of just 740 volumes and three maps.

Next week, on April 24, millions of books and much history later, the Library of Congress celebrates its 200th anniversary as an institution that grew, in the words of one of its biographers, into \"a symbol of American democracy and faith in the power of learning.\"

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Libraries boom despite the Web

Finally a Story that admits the web is not going to shut down libraries.

\"It soon became clear that libraries are far from the tar pit - that, in fact, as both Reid and Keith Lance, director of Library Research Services for the Colorado State Library, noted: This idea so many people have, about libraries declining in the age of the Internet, is just wrong. Libraries, in fact, recognized the competition that technology presented and have offered it themselves.

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Net Library -Nyet

Thomas J. Hennen Jr. writes:


Only those of a certain age argue about whether it was Pogo or the Alligator that said: Younger demographic groups just look it up on the web. :-)


What a difference a few months can make in the looking glass world of e-texts! Five months ago, I lamenated that NetLibrary (tm) was marketing to gen-exers not boomers like myself. But now NetLibrary has cut off both exers as individuals and me at the virtual knees! And, it appears, librarians like myself must share the blame.

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LOC Commemorative Stamp

The Citizens\' Stamp Advisory Committee, a group of independent citizens appointed by the Postmaster General to review more than 40,000 suggestions for stamp subjects received by the United States Postal Service each year, recommended a commemorative stamp for issuance on the Library\'s Bicentennial date, April 24, 2000. Ethel Kessler, the designer of the breast cancer stamp issued on July 29, 1998 by First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and Postmaster General William Henderson, has designed the Library\'s Bicentennial commemorative stamp, as pictured here on the Library of Congress Website

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1,000 Years at British Library

The AP Wire is carrying this story;

A 1,000-year-old book of riddles, a 15th-century love letter and a 20th-century bear named Pooh: All are strands in the rich history of English literature being celebrated this summer by the British Library.

This body of literature is ``the thing, above anything else, that Britain has given to the world in the course of the last millennium,\'\' government arts secretary Chris Smith says about the national library\'s major exhibit for the year 2000.

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Rewriting the book on library funding

A special commission here in NY is calling for a rethinking of the way libraries across the state are paid for. New York should contribute far more state funds to local libraries and base the allocation on need, according to the Regents Commission on Library Services, which for the last 18 months has been looking at ways of improving the state\'s vast library system. Read the story at The Times Union, Albany.

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Mold causes new problem for UNLV library

The Las Vegas Review-Journal has a report on troubling mold in the library at UNLV.

\"UNLV\'s troubled Lied Library has suffered another setback with the discovery of dangerous molds growing in the unfinished building.
Workers this week are trying to get rid of moldy materials that otherwise would pose a threat to the students, librarians and books that this summer are expected to fill the $53 million facility. \"

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Sneak Previews by email

La Grange Park and Lyons public libraries in Chicago are now sending out select chapters of books to their patrons by email. Check out The Chicago Sun Times for the full story.


\"We\'re trying to find a balance between books and computers,\" said Dixie Conkis, executive director of the La Grange Park Library. \"It\'s a marriage of the old and the new.\"

\"The American Library Association said this is the only service of its kind. About 30 libraries across the country have signed up, said Suzanne Beecher, founder of the Chapter-A-Day Internet site, which made its online book club available to libraries in January.\"

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Hacker cuts library catalog access

MySan Antonio.com has a report on a mischievious hacker that shut an OPAC down in San Antonio, TX.

\"
I warn you before,\" it read in part. The hacker also left greetings for friends and signed himself as the \"Great Magoo.\" He blamed President Clinton for his actions.\"

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Bill collectors heed libraries page

This Story from The Orlando Sentinel, has a great first line:


\"If you hate being shushed by librarians, brace yourself for something even worse: A collection agency may soon be calling about those long-overdue books. The Seminole County Public Library System is joining a handful of others in Florida taking advantage of a 1996 law allowing public libraries to use collection agencies to go after their worst offenders.\"


Of course they do arrest people for overdure books in FL too.

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