Libraries

Iraqi libraries ransacked by Islamic State group in Mosul

Residents say the extremists smashed the locks that had protected the biggest repository of learning in the northern Iraq town, and loaded about 2,000 books %u2014 including children%u2019s stories, poetry, philosophy, and tomes on sports, health, culture and science %u2014 into six pickup trucks. They left only Islamic texts.

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/world/2015/02/01/iraqi-libraries-ransacked-islamic-state-gro...
and
http://www.sfgate.com/world/article/Islamic-State-militants-ransack-libraries-in-Mosul-60540...

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Library social worker helps homeless seeking quiet refuge


Meet the nation's first full-time library social worker. Instead of trying to keep homeless residents from taking shelter in the urban haven of public libraries, San Francisco has adopted a new approach: employing a trained professional to address the needs of these visitors. The NewsHour’s Cat Wise reports.

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Library offers new way to share books

The Montgomery County Library System soon will add a new offering to its usual items for check-out.

Instead of just borrowing a book, selected county residents will be able to take a "Little Free Library" out on loan - and set it up in their neighborhood or in front of a business.

Melissa Baker, library marketing and program coordinator, explained that Little Free Library is a movement started by Todd Bol and Rick Brooks in Wisconsin in 2009.

http://www.chron.com/neighborhood/woodlands/news/article/Library-offers-new-way-to-share-boo...

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Artist Draws His Impression of 99 Branches of the Toronto Library

From August through October of last year, 25-year-old artist and geographer Daniel Rotsztain boarded buses, trains, streetcars and his bike with an inky pen in hand and plenty of paper. His goal was to capture the city’s bastions of books by drawing each one of them in a “homey, but blue print style”— a feat he sometimes conquered amidst scorching heat and drizzling rain.

The project was born out of a conversation Rotsztain had with friends about their favourite library branches. "It’s a love letter to the library,” he told The Toronto Star. It is hard to just wander randomly, but to have this quest oriented me well to explore every corner of every borough of the city.”

He is releasing the images on his website and is eagerly anticipating drawing the 100th library to open in the Scarborough Centre area this spring.

Hat tip to Steven Cohen Library Stuff.

The Internet of Things Plan To Make Libraries and Museums Awesomer

The new tech arrives at a tranistional time for cultural institutions. As technology has advanced, it%u2019s changed why people visit libraries and museums. In the wake of the Great Recession, just as many people used libraries for free computer and Internet access as they did to borrow books.
http://www.fastcompany.com/3040451/elasticity/the-internet-of-things-plan-to-make-libraries-...

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Seven Library Myths...BUSTED!

From our friends Libraries as Incubators via The Huffington Post:

#1: Libraries are quiet spaces--all the time, everywhere
#2: Book clubs are snooze-fests
#3: Library craft activities are old-fashioned, boring, or for kids only
#4: Libraries are about books--and that's it
#5 Libraries are boring
#6 Libraries are for nerds
#7 Libraries are for little kids

Follow @IArtLibraries on twitter for more inspiration from Erinn Batykefer and Laura Damon-Moore and their team. Here's the website.

NPR's StoryCorps @ Your Library

via Pub-Lib:

StoryCorps, in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA) Public Programs Office, is accepting applications from public libraries and library systems interested in hosting StoryCorps @ your library programs.

Funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS),= StoryCorps @ your library will bring StoryCorps' popular interview methods= to libraries while developing a replicable model of oral history programming.

Program guidelines and the online application are available at apply.ala.or= g/storycorps. The application deadline is Feb. 6.

Ten selected sites will receive:

* a $2,500 stipend for project-related expenses;
* portable recording equipment;
* a two-day, in-person training on interview collection, digital recording
techniques and archiving on April 8-9, 2014, led byStoryCorps staff in Brooklyn, New York
* two two-hour planning meetings to develop a program and outreach strategy with
StoryCorps staff in March 2015;
* promotional materials and technical and outreach support;
* access to and use of StoryCorps' proprietary interview database.

Each library will be expected to record at least 40 interviews during the six-month interview collection period (May-October 2015). In addition, each library must plan at least one public program inspired by the interviews they collect. Local libraries will retain copies of all interviews and preser= vation copies will also be deposited with the Library of Congress.

This StoryCorps @ your library grant offering represents the second phase of the StoryCorps @ your library project, following a pilot program in 2013-14. Read more at StoryCorps and StoryCorps @ your library.

Doris Lessing's Books to Go to Zimbabwe Libraries

From ABC News:

Nobel Prize-winning novelist Doris Lessing, who died last year, spent her early years in Zimbabwe. She is still giving back to the country whose former white rulers banished her for speaking against racial discrimination.

The bulk of Lessing's book collection was handed over to the Harare City Library (at the corner of Rotten Row and Pennyfeather), which will catalogue the more than 3,000 books. The donation complements the author's role in opening libraries in Zimbabwe, to make books available to rural people.

"For us she continues to live," said 42-year-old Kempson Mudenda, who worked with Lessing when she established the Africa Community Publishing and Development Trust.

"The libraries she helped set up are giving life to village children who would otherwise be doomed," said Mudenda, who said he used to trudge bush paths daily to reach remote villages with books.

Lessing's trust started libraries in thatched mud huts and under trees after the author was allowed to return to Zimbabwe following independence in 1980.

Ferguson Municipal Public Library Tour



Welcome to the Ferguson Municipal Public Library, NOW with SUPER SHAKY CAM (TM). This tour will show you around the public areas of the library. A simple video introduction, and a big welcome to every single human being in the city of Ferguson, Missouri!

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Duluth library's seed sharing program hits a hurdle

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture has given a thumbs down to a Duluth seed-sharing program that allows members to borrow vegetable seeds from the library in the spring and later return seeds they collect from their gardens.

State agriculture regulators say the exchange — one of about 300 in the United States — violates the state's seed law because it does not test seeds.

That could jeopardize the popular program, which attracted 200 members who borrowed 800 packets of seeds in its first year, manager Carla Powers said.

In September, the library got a surprise visit from a Minnesota Department of Agriculture seed inspector. He informed the library it was likely violating Minnesota's seed law, which regulates the selling of seeds.

Full article:
http://www.mprnews.org/story/2014/11/30/duluth-librarys-seed-sharing-program-hits-a-hurdle

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