Libraries

Library cat attacks assistance dog

Alert reader Charles Davis sent along This Story from
ananova.com on a
man that filed a $1.5 million claim against a
California city, after a cat who lives in the public library
allegedly attacked
his dog.
The cat was apparently uninjured.
The cat is featured on the
library\'s
website
, and even has it\'s own FAQ. They say it\'s usually lounging on
bookshelves or cabinets
and is popular with the library\'s readers.
The man says his assistance dog was attacked by
LC moments after they entered the library in
Escondido.MGTC passed along Two more Stories on the same thing.
I don\'t quite know what to say on this one, some
animals just get along like, well, cats and dogs.

The Library Buildings Boom

LA Times Story on the new Central Library and the name that is stiring up some Controversy.

The Story from Seattle is a bit different, it mostly focuses on the team designing the new Central Library. The library is busy evolving even before it gets built.

Hopefully to avoid The Mess in Paris. The new National Library which has \"stupendously impractical architecture\", a large stairway that is slippery in the rain and open to the winds, awkwardly structured spaces for both researchers and staff, impractically situated toilets and so on.

Library Thievary

Charles Davis sent in this Story library officials at the Quincy public library in MA, discovered a stained-glass window
worth a minimum of $100,000 is missing and was apparently stolen in January. The thief removed the entire frame containing the window that has been on display since
1883 in the H.H. Richardson building of the Thomas Crane Public Library.


In Better News from IA, -- A thief who lifted 452 compact discs and six digital video discs from Hayner Public Library, then pawned them at two shops, was caught, and the loot recovered.

Ya win some, ya lose some.

On Library Services and Management

Judy Westbrook was kind enough to send along more
information on Robert S. Martin, just nominated to be
Director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

He was in charge of this outsourcing study , \"The
Impact of Outsourcing and Privatization on Library
Services and Management\". The study examined in
detail outsourcing of cataloging, selection, and
management of library operations. They say they found
no evidence that outsourcing per se represents a threat
to library governance, or to the role of the library in
protecting the First Amendment rights of the public.

The most fascinating library buildings in world!

Godfrey
Oswald
writes \"I recently returned from an
extensive trip last week to some European countries to
obtain routine outside photographs of the national
libraries, as part of my ongoing book project to update
the 1999 Internet version of the forthcoming Book of
Library Records

I was left dumbstruck for more than half an hour when I
made my first trip to the new Bibliothèques Nationale in
south Paris, having seen
the old building in central Paris many times before.

But on the way home, I realised a new entry for the book
project will be a great idea: The most fascinating library
buildings in the world

I will naturaly want the opinions of all librarians to be
paramount, and not just mine, so I have decided to ask
librarians to give me their
vote for the most fascinating library buildings in the
world. \"

Find out how you can vote......... -- Read More

Stealing from the library

Will the library crimes never stop?

Missouri libraries found someone Selling Stolen Books on eBay. Library officials first learned the books were missing in January after receiving a call from a New York man who purchased an O\'Brian book over the Internet that had the library\'s stamp and bar code.


In Tennessee, after her request to automate the library was Turned Down librarian Elizabeth Potts took matters into her own hands, then Someone Stole it. A giant pickle jar stuffed with money was stolen.

\'\'I just think it\'s kind of low down,\'\' Potts said. \'\'Somebody stole our pickle jar, and that was money we were collecting to fund automation of the library.\'\'

Top Censored Library Stories of 1998/2000

Sanford Berman, one of the 20th Century\'s library heroes, wrote a summary of the past three years\' Top Five Censored Library Stories, in the style of Project Censored\'s annual collections of the most significant news stories that were suppressed by the corporate media. Sandy\'s piece was originally written for the print journal The U*N*A*B*A*S*H*E*D L*I*B*R*A*R*I*A*N and was republished on the web in this week\'s Library Juice. Sanford Berman is co-editor of the biennial anthology Alternative Library Literature, published by McFarland.

HP Ad Redux

A few days back Helen wrote \"Check out a recent ad
by HP Labs, featuring librarian Eugenie Prime. Not sure
if this is a step forward or a step back . . . The Ad PDF \"

It\'s been submitted a few more times, with
one person taking a slightly different view, one person
wrote:


\"The April 16th issue of Time has a very repugnant
ad by HP sterotyping
every librarian who ever existed - you might want to tell
them what you
think, pages 70-71, Not to mention that primpy frumpy
whatever is not a librarian!!!!!!!!!!!!!!\"

I just don\'t know what to say on this one. In a
profession obsessed with image, what does This Ad say about us?

Library Says, No Shoes No Service

The Columbus Metropolitan Library is being sued for refusing to let a patron tread the aisles in his bare feet. [more...] from The Columbus Dispatch.

Library efficiency draws praise

Here\'s a Cool Story from businessinvancouver.com on a local library making some good moves.

The Richmond Public Library is now offering classes on \"the Ironwood model\" of library management. Deputy chief librarian Cate McNeely even uses terms like \"merchandising\"! I\'m a big fan of this type of library management.


\"How do you do the things that we always talk about doing, but always say we don\'t have enough money or enough time or enough staff to do? We knew that if we did things in the traditional way, the majority of our resources would just be going to checking in and checking out books. And it would mean not being open 74 hours a week, not doing daily story time, not having the librarians available on the floor to help people choose that best book, and so on.\"

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