Libraries

Library Quickies

A gaggle of almost related stories I\'ve been sitting on for too long.Yahoo! News Story on how much overdue books are costing libraries.
``Focus groups have told us returning (overdue) library books can be embarrassing, so we\'re trying to add some fun to it,\'\' said Peggy Pievach, the library\'s marketing director


This Story on 3 guys who were using a library computer to print out a series of phony checks.Police arrested them as they were printing the checks. Maybe they had to pay for all their overdue books?


A couple more follow...... -- Read More

New Legislation Would Force Disclosure of Presidential Library Donors

Congressional lawmakers are considering legislation that would make donors and donation amounts to presidential libraries public. As if we didn\'t know this was coming. Better make sure you get a receipt. [more...] from CNS News.

Prison and Law Libraries

A few law(ish) library related stories The Rocky Mountain News has
Books from the cellblock on the library district\'s \"Begin with Books\", an umbrella for a variety of programs that encourage parents to read to their children.

Online won\'t replace real law books says 67 percent of attorneys anticipate the libraries in their firms will decrease in size but only 3 percent expect them to be eliminated entirely within the next 10 years.

\"Ask ERL\", an ever-evolving database of electronic resources that everyone at Day Berry (A Law Firm) can access through our intranet, set up to catalog good websites.

Palaces Of the People

The Washington Post has an OP-ED piece from US First Lady and Ex-librarian Laura Bush.

She has some mighty nice things to say about libraries.

\"School libraries -- all libraries, for that matter -- are more than warehouses for books. They are gathering places, literally community centers, and have been since 1638, when John Harvard donated money and books to create one of our nation\'s first libraries in Cambridge, Mass. \"

Library Card Catalog, R.I.P.

Wired has a good Story on the new OPAC at Sonoma State University. Rather than following DDC or LC they use ARS, a system that is completely random. It\'s all done with computers and robots.
They say librarians are happy and say randomness is what makes the system so effective. Cal State Northridge was the first library to get ARS, UNLV aand Eastern Michigan University also have the Automated Retrieval System. No more browsing the stacks for the perfect book.

\"\"I think there was a lot of trepidation up front, especially by traditional users like faculty who are very devoted to the idea of browsing shelves, and of having everything exactly where it was last year,\" Butler said. \"There was some anxiety. But once we explained what it does for us, then they began to understand the principle at work.\"

Woman jailed for taking three extra library books

Charles Davis writes \"From
TheStar.com
Reported at
Ananova.com
A Chinese woman has been jailed for a week and fined
£2,000 after taking three more library books than she was
allowed.


She wanted to borrow eight
books at once from the Library, and had ripped the barcodes off the three extra
books but still triggered electronic detectors.


Her lawyer said: \"At the time, all the eight books that the
accused wanted to borrow were of great interest to her.\"

She could have been jailed for up to three years.\"

Next Library Trend May Involve Connecting Libraries Around the World

Richard Allen [writes...]A Quebec software company wants to link together libraries around the globe in order to create a super-mega bibliopolis.
According to David Dorman, columnist for American Libraries, \"It is clear that each library\'s individual catalog can no longer be the centerpiece of the library\'s efforts to organize the resources it provides to its patrons. It is now just one tool among many, all of which need to be integrated into a coherent system for the information-seeker.\" [more...] from The International Herald Tribune

Libraries Popping Up Everwhere

With all this talk about library closings, it\'s good too see
some new libraries popping up in some unexpected
places.A homeless shelter
in in AZ, post offices in England.
Meanwhile in France, the French national library
says it has the largest virtual
library
in the world. 87,000 books have been
converted to a digital format, so it doesn\'t matter where
they are.
Thanks to Robert Aubin for these.

Fraudulent borrowers cost libraries $10,000

Here\'s yet another story on
public library thefts. Detectives are investigating a
library theft ring whose members took at least $10,000
worth of materials from at least 16 libraries in several
OH counties over five months.


They used at least five fraudulent names to take out
About $10,000 worth of DVDs, CDs, videos and books.
Overdue notices sent to the fraudulent addresses were
returned by the postal service in December, and the
libraries then knew they had been ripped off.

It\'s so sad how often I see this now.

US Presidential Libraries

The
Chicago Tribune
has a Story on
the Presidential Libraries in the US.

They say presidential libraries have become elaborate
and expensive and are aimed at staking a president\'s
claim to greatness, and are so expensive you could run
a presidential campaign on what they cost. President
Bill Clinton\'s library in Little Rock, Ark., has been
estimated at $100 million to $125 million.

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