Libraries

Library? Students prefer using Web to do research

ModBee.com has This One that says for many of today\'s students, the Dewey Decimal System is ancient history.

They are talking about The Study by Pew Internet & American Life Project. Seventy-three percent of the 12- to 17-year-olds who were interviewed said they used the Internet. And of the 754 Internet users surveyed, 94 percent said they used it for academic research.I haven\'t gone through the study myself, but the results don\'t look good as reported.

\"You can find stuff about basically anything on the Internet,\" said Brittany Pittman, a high school sophomore, who used the Internet for a paper on Princess Diana last year. \"It\'s so much easier than finding something in the library.\"

What libraries can do to help

There is a discussion developing on WEB4LIB on What libraries can do to help at a time like this.

So far LC has said \"the Library of Congress and the Congressional Research Service, and all of our librarians, are providing reference and information services and analysis to Congress as they deliberate today and over the coming days on \"What next\"...\"

Other people have said that they are staying open, and answering questions on NYC and The World Trade Center.

I am amazed at how everyone is pulling together on this, it\'s truly amazing. Corporations, individuals, everyone is really doing whatever they can to ease the pain, and help us as a country to move forward.

So what else can libraries do to help? Post your ideas below. -- Read More

Board Wants Contractor to Direct Library - Ethical Questions Raised

Most of the members of the Missaukee (MI) District Library board want to hurry up and hire a new director before the state enforces legislation that would require library directors to hold an MSLS. Residents are questioning the ethics of hiring on the basis that, among other things, the contractor could write off personal vacations as business expenses. Earlier this year 900 people signed petitions asking for the resignation of board members after they fired two library directors in one year. The members refuse to resign. more... from The Traverse City Record Eagle.

At Long Last, SoHo Lands a Library

The New York Public Library is planning to open a new branch in a converted 19th century chocolate factory in Manhattan.:

For the longtime residents who moved into SoHo in the 1970\'s, when the neighborhood was still largely a manufacturing district, the library is a long-sought triumph. \"It kind of represents that we\'re not a mall, we\'re not a center for tourism, we\'re a real neighborhood,\" said [resident] Sean Sweeney . . .

More from the New York Times (registration required.)

The color of Internet access

ALICIA CALDWELL of the St. Petersburg Times writes:\"In what is the largest national survey of computer use, the U.S. Commerce Department today released statistics that show African-American and Hispanic children are far less likely to have a computer at home than white children. Consequently, computer access at schools and public libraries is particularly important to these youngsters as computers increasingly become life tools in the 21st century.\"
The story goes on to describe what libraries and schools in Tampa Bay are doing to provide access.
Full Story

Library throws the book at patron

The Dallasnews is running This One on a man who landed in jail because of Cinderella and Tom and Jerry. They say that about 20 people have been arrested in 10 years in Nolan County, TX.

His failure to return the two books he\'d checked out for his children, plus two others about handwriting analysis, cost him more than $1,000, jeopardized his job and left him with a criminal record.

\"It\'s crazy,\" said Mr. Fox. \"It\'s ludicrous. This is on my record as theft; nobody can believe it was over library books.\"

Library book returned after 24 years

Someone writes \"Librarians are always hearing wild, wonderful and flimsy excuses for the late return of books.
But former student Mohamed Bokreta could only write of his \"juvenile and youthful wicked whims\" after returning a book to South Thames College in London after 24 years...

Full Story \"

He went on to say :\"I am seeking both apologies and pardon from my dear friends, the respected college principal and his brave librarian staff\".

I just returned one about 11 years over due I found when I moved, ouch.

Mixed Feelings About A Legendary Library

Here\'s an entertaining commentary on the pros-and-cons of
Oxford University\'s somewhat archaic but venerable Bodleian Library:

I should mention that the library takes four to five hours to \"fetch\" a book from its stacks. Readers are advised to order what they need in the morning so they\'ll have it by afternoon. An all-morning wait should be enough to force a person into careful consideration. So why I ordered Universalis Arithmetica is a puzzler. This book is a ridiculously valuable first edition of a massively important work, true. Newton was still at Cambridge in 1707 when the Bodleian\'s edition was printed. . .

More from the National Post.

New Study Finds Few Students Turning to Libraries

Unsurpisingly, a new study from the Pew Internet & American Life Project has found that the majority of students turn to the Web for assistance with their homework, bypassing libraries:

Seventy-one percent of middle school and high school students with Internet access said they relied on the electronic technology the most in completing a project, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project. That compares to 24 percent who said they relied on libraries the most, according to the survey. . .

More from Reuters.

More Killer Mold

Richard Feldman writes: \"Thought you might want to pick up the story on Santa Fe, NM main library\'s being closed for up to 4 months because of mold infestation. The local paper currently has a story. I don\'t know how long that link will continue to work.\"


Is there a plague of killer molds sweeping the nation I don\'t know about? I think this is mold story #4.

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