Libraries

Reinventing the Library - The New York Times

Librarians today are forced to take on a variety of functions that their society is too miserly or contemptuous to fulfill, and the use of their scant resources to meet those essential social obligations diminishes their funds for buying new books and other materials. But a library is not a homeless shelter (at the St. Agnes library in New York, I witnessed a librarian explaining to a customer why she could not sleep on the floor), a nursery or a fun fair (the Seneca East Public Library in Attica, Ohio, offers pajama parties), or a prime provider of social support and medical care (which American librarians today nonetheless routinely give).

From Reinventing the Library - The New York Times

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Reinventing the Library

Op-ed by Alberto Manguel

Excerpt: Plato, in the “Timaeus,” says that when one of the wisest men of Greece, the statesman Solon, visited Egypt, he was told by an old priest that the Greeks were like mere children because they possessed no truly ancient traditions or notions “gray with time.” In Egypt, the priest continued proudly, “there is nothing great or beautiful or remarkable that is done here, or in your country, or in any other land that has not been long since put into writing and preserved in our temples.”

Full piece: http://nyti.ms/1R0E2G8

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A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed

Little wonder this extraordinary man has continually fascinated and served as inspiration to artists from Shakespeare and Ben Johnson to Derek Jarman and Damon Albarn.

Now, the intriguing and mysterious Dee, who survived the machinations of the late Tudor period only to die in poverty in 1608/9, is to be revealed to the public through his remarkable personal library for the first time in history.

From A magical glimpse into the Tudor imagination: Lost library of John Dee to be revealed | Culture24

Identity crisis: Downtown Omaha library's quest to be welcoming to all makes it unwelcoming to many

Holly Barrett has heard a lot of things on the sidewalk in front of Omaha’s downtown library.

“Hey, pretty lady, can I have your phone number?”
“Can I take you to dinner?”
Barrett said a man who hung out in front of the library’s steps for a few weeks last summer escalated to: “You know I don’t want to rape you, so why won’t you just give me your phone number?”

Barrett, who is the executive director of the Downtown Improvement District and lives downtown, said she walks by the W. Dale Clark Library often, and it’s not a comfortable place.

Full article:
http://www.omaha.com/news/metro/identity-crisis-downtown-omaha-library-s-quest-to-be-welcomi...

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Library Patrons Can Now ‘Check Out’ A 7-Day Colorado State Parks Pass

Colorado Parks and Wildlife has teamed up with eight libraries across Colorado for the Check-Out Colorado State Park Program. The program offers residents the ability to check out one of two seven-day hang-tag park passes at each library. The pass is good for entrance to all 42 state parks.

From Library Patrons Can Now ‘Check Out’ A 7-Day Colorado State Parks Pass « CBS Denver

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Artist-Designed Miniature Libraries Make Literacy Open, Free and Beautiful

Developed by Rachel M. Simon, The Public Collection fuses the book station with art installation, to “improve literacy, foster a deeper appreciation of the arts, and raise awareness for education and social justice in our community.” To do this, Simon invited nine local artists to make book stations that doubled as sculptural works and placed them in various locations around the city. (Check out the map here to see where the sculptural book stations are located.)

From Artist-Designed Miniature Libraries Make Literacy Open, Free and Beautiful | GOOD

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Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations

Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations The Educopia Institute is pleased to release a new publication, Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations. Authored by the "Mapping the Landscapes" project team (38 archives, library, and museums partner and supporting organizations collaborating on the IMLS-funded project), the publication adds to past LAM-wide collaboration studies by documenting both real and perceived boundaries that silently impact our ability to collaborate across the wide variety of organizations in the fields (and their myriad sub-fields), including organizational sizes and governance structures, staffing and funding levels, acronyms and vocabularies, disciplinary specialties and user communities served.

From Spanning Our Field Boundaries: Mindfully Managing LAM Collaborations | Educopia

‘Libraries are forever’: The future of libraries in the digital age

We tend to think of libraries as collections. But the libraries of the future will be more about connections, said Harvard professor Jeffrey Schnapp on Wednesday. He spoke on a panel discussion for HUBweek, co-founded by the Boston Globe about the next generation of libraries. The event was hosted by Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

From ‘Libraries are forever’: The future of libraries in the digital age | BetaBoston

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Check Out What You Can Borrow From A Library In Alaska (NPR)

NPR Morning Edition interview with Celia Rozen about the furs, mounts, and skulls collection at ARLIS, Alaska Resources LIbrary and Information Services.

http://www.npr.org/2015/10/07/446499508/check-out-what-you-can-borrow-fr...

Where Do Books from Closed Libraries Go?

Philly Voice answers the {infrequently asked} question:

Q) What happens to the books at closed libraries like the South Philadelphia one at Broad and Morris streets?

Question answered by Jennifer Maguire-Wright, chief manager of materials for the Free Library of Philadelphia:

A) The materials in the South Philadelphia collection were mostly sent to other neighborhood libraries in the library system. Items that were in poor condition or outdated were withdrawn from the collection -- we call it “weeding,” in library lingo. Those items are typically offered to other city agencies for a period of time and then sold in book sales.

How do you determine which ones get the boot?

We have a collection development policy that includes details on how we keep our collections fresh and current. Typically, items are removed from the collection due to condition. Our books can be well-loved to the point that they are falling apart. For non-fiction, we have guides based on the content. A good example is health-related materials. Anything older than five years is looked at critically to see if there are newer titles on the topic ...

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