Libraries

Good Luck to This Guy

California State Librarian, Greg Lucas, seeks money for CA libraries in a visit to Congress.

It’s going to be a tough fight: The president’s budget today proposed deep cuts into public libraries’ existing budgets, and it would eliminate perhaps a third of the state library’s budget.

In California, more than half the population — about 22 million — have library cards.

Congress is closely divided and partisanship is deeply entrenched, but a sound library system is not a partisan issue, argues Lucas. Story from Capitol Weekly.

A Miniature Working Model of the National Archives Vault

Via Atlas Obscura, a reminder of the existence of a model of the National Archives Vault and the time President Nixon visited it.

Lou Reed's Archive Aquired by NYPL

From The New Yorker. The Collection comprises around three hundred linear feet of paper records, electronic records, and photographs; some thirty-six hundred audio recordings; and some thirteen hundred video recordings.

RIP Dmoz: The Open Directory Project is closing

The Open Directory Project that uses human editors to organize web sites — is closing. It marks the end of a time when humans, rather than machines, tried to organize the web. The announcement came via a notice that’s now showing on the home page of the DMOZ site, saying it will close as of March 14, 2017:
From RIP Dmoz: The Open Directory Project is closing
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Uncovering the Hidden Books Tucked Inside Every Single Library

“It’s really hard to find them,” says Kopley. She had more success looking in scholarly databases, where she could turn up examples that others had written about, and in collections of book reviews. But those searches revealed anonymous texts that were already known, in some way. “The hardest thing is to find a completely unknown or unstudied author who was anonymous or pseudonymous,” she says.
From Uncovering the Hidden Books Tucked Inside Every Single Library | Atlas Obscura
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Getting Kids to Read the Stuffed Animal Way

Via CNN.

West Orange NJ's childrens librarian Faith Boyle read "Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale" by Mo Willems to a group of children and their fluff-filled companions. After that late afternoon story time, the children kissed their toys good night.

A group of teenage volunteers quickly got to work, snapping photos of the stuffed animals in the library. There were images of a teddy bear and bunny holding hands while watching a puppet show and a tiny plush alligator reading about swamps. Even the photos of the monkeys sneaking Chips Ahoy cookies from the break room made it onto the library's Facebook page.

The value of libraries

Most library activity is entertainment, not research, not knowledge. It's still difficult, even with SAILS, to find good technical books. Romance novels, detective stories, sure, hundreds of those. But the tech side is weak at best. So my question is this: would the general public support libraries if all that entertainment went away? I don't think they would
From The value of libraries
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Information is garbage

And tsunami is an apt description of what we now face. We all generate and consume information on countless screens. Information is now free-form. It’s evident in our move away from formalized data stores into call-and-response APIs. It’s evident in our information-gathering habits – now more a process of grazing than a formal process of gathering. And it’s evident in our media which now comes at us with a force unmatched in history. The world around us wants to offer us all the information all the time and we have no time to assess what is true, what is not, and, most important, what is valuable.
From Information is garbage | TechCrunch
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Fall from Grace (well sorta) for Milo Yiannopouloss

From Mediaite, news that Simon & Schuster has cancelled publication of Milo Yiannopouloss book (after creating hell for all their other authors). He has also left the extreme right-leaning Breitbart News.

Here's another piece from the Washington Post. And Ryan Lizza's piece from the New Yorker.

Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs

Dewey and his crew of “a dozen catalogers and librarians” spent, in his estimation, “an hour daily for nearly an entire week” hashing out the rules of library hand. They started by examining hundreds of card catalogs, looking for penmanship problems and coming up with ways to solve them. They concluded that the “simpler and fewer the lines the better,” and decided that, while a slant was best avoided, a slight backward slant was acceptable. Then they got to the more nitty-gritty stuff, such as whether to opt for a “square-topped 3” or a “rounded-top 3.” (The rounded-top 3 won out, as it is less likely to be mistaken for a 5 during hasty reading.)
From Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs | Atlas Obscura
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