Libraries

Best Books of the Year @ Amazon.com

More About Amazon.com's Best Books of 2017 All year, Amazon.com's editorial team reads with an eye for the Best Books of the Month, plus the best books in popular categories like Cooking, Food & Wine, Literature & Fiction, Children's books, Mystery & Thrillers, Comics & Graphic Novels, Romance, Science Fiction & Fantasy, the best books for teens, and more. We scour reviews and book news for tips on what the earliest readers have loved, share our own copies and tear through as many books as possible. Then we face off in a monthly Best Books meeting to champion the titles we think will resonate most with readers. In October, we collect all our favorites, look at upcoming 2017 titles, and cast our ballots for the Best Books of the Year. The titles that made our lists are the keepers, the ones we couldn't forget. Many of our editorial picks for the best books are also customer favorites and best sellers, but we love to spotlight the best books you might not otherwise have heard about, too. The books included in Amazon's Best Books program are entirely editorial selections. We are committed to helping customers find terrific gifts for booklovers and drawing more attention to exceptional authors. Our passion is for uniting readers of all ages and tastes with their next favorite reads.
From Best Books of the Year @ Amazon.com
Topic: 

In the Archives: Poison Pages

Originally a byproduct of the European mining industry, arsenic offered mining companies a means of profiting from a waste product, and offered manufacturers a means of obtaining a cheap dye. Thousands of tons were annually imported to the United States. The substance produced lovely hues ranging from deep emerald to pale sea-green. Arsenic could also be mixed into other colors, giving them a soft, appealing pastel appearance. The first application of arsenic as a pigment was as a paint dye. The pale green shade caught on as a “refined” color. American manufacturers began using arsenic to color a range of consumer goods. Children’s toys were painted with arsenical paint. Arsenic-dyed paper was used in greeting cards, stationery, candy boxes, concert tickets, posters, food container labels, mailing labels, pamphlets, playing cards, book-bindings, and envelopes –envelopes the sender had to lick.
From The Ann Arbor Chronicle | In the Archives: Poison Pages
Topic: 

Card catalogs and the secret history of modernity

Card catalogs feel very old but are shockingly new. Merchants stored letters and slips of paper on wire or thread in the Renaissance. (Our word “file” comes from filum, or wire.) But a whole technology, based on scientific principles, for storing, retrieving, and circulating an infinitely extensible batch of documents? That is some modern-ass shit. And it helped create the world we all live in.
From Card catalogs and the secret history of modernity
Topic: 

Are You a Public Librarian?

An award might be in your future.

Here’s information from ALA/PLA if you wish to make a nomination.

Biloxi Junior High will again teach 'To Kill A Mockingbird' in class, after national outcry

Biloxi has sent a letter home to students. It plans to restore “To Kill A Mockingbird” to the eighth-grade classroom and begin teaching it again in class, starting Monday. Students do, however, have to ask to participate, by returning a permission slip signed by a parent to their school and their English Language Arts teacher by Friday.
From Biloxi Junior High will again teach 'To Kill A Mockingbird' in class, after national outcry | The Sun Herald
Topic: 

Alameda County Library Patron Records Possibly Hacked

An email to library members says officials were contacted last month by someone claiming to have information from the library system’s entire database of users. That contact included the names and addresses of about three dozen library patrons.
From Alameda County Library Patron Records Possibly Hacked « CBS San Francisco
Topic: 

The woman who went to the library and read every book on the shelf

Phyllis Rose's book about her extreme reading experiment, in which she tackled the entire contents of a shelf in a New York library, has won high praise, but are such 'bibliomemoirs' a sign of an increasingly superficial literary culture or vital guides for a public swamped by choice?
From The woman who went to the library and read every book on the shelf | Books | The Guardian
Topic: 

To Kill A Mockingbird Pulled From Reading List

CBS NEWS reports that a school district in Missippi has pulled Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird from a junior high reading list as the discussion of race “makes people uncomfortable.”. The book remains in libraries (fortunately).

How Living in a Library Gave One Man the Thirst of Learning

Via NPR’s Story Corps a reminiscence of a youth spent in the library when his father was employed there as a custodian. The boy’s name was Ronald Clark, and he became the first in his family to attend college, and later became a college professor.

How one local librarian made all the difference to a 6-year-old recovering from a concussion

Lisa Cipolla has a saying: “Better living through story time.”

Which makes sense, since Cipolla is a youth-services librarian at the South Hill Library. A big part of her job is wrangling and entertaining young ones during the Pierce County library’s regularly scheduled drop-in story times for toddlers and preschoolers.

For Jackie Blackshaw, and her 6-year-old son, Tony, Cipolla’s saying has certainly proven true.

Full article
Topic: 

Pages

Subscribe to Libraries