Libraries

MIT task force releases preliminary “Future of Libraries” report

The MIT task force arranged ideas about the MIT Libraries into four “pillars,” which structure the preliminary report. They are “Community and Relationships,” involving the library’s interactions with local and global users; “Discovery and Use,” regarding the provision of information; “Stewardship and Sustainability,” involving the management and protection of MIT’s scholarly resources; and “Research and Development,” addressing the analysis of library practices and needs. The preliminary report contains 10 general recommendations in these areas.
From MIT task force releases preliminary “Future of Libraries” report | MIT News
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It's Not Too Late to Save the Stacks

For in-depth assignments, nothing replaces the chance to introduce students face-to-face to a nonvirtual librarian who can help them navigate the research process. One invaluable lesson of standing next to a real person undertaking real-time information browsing: Students learn that good information takes time to locate. Even the experts have to problem-solve through some deadends and overgeneralized hits before finding a good source. And when something suitable turns up, students can share that eureka moment or the relief of genuine gratitude with another person. All of this takes place in the physical space of the library and its community of books and people.
From It's Not Too Late to Save the Stacks - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Bob Dylan

The Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 Bob Dylan The Nobel Prize in Literature for 2016 is awarded to Bob Dylan "for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition".
From The Nobel Prize in Literature 2016 - Press Release
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How to help libraries learn about open source

Right now, if you walked into my public library and pelted me with questions about open source—like, "What is it?" "How does it work?" "How can I use open source?"—I'd rattle off answers so fast you'd be walking out with a new tool or technology under your belt. Open source is a big world, so of course there are some things I don't know, but guess what? We have the Internet and books right at our finger tips. Saying that you don't know the answer is fine, and patrons will respect you for it. The key is helping them find the answer.
From How to help libraries learn about open source | Opensource.com
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Inside the New York Public Library's Last, Secret Apartments

Some have spent decades empty and neglected. "The managers would sort of meekly say to me—do you want to see the apartment?" says Iris Weinshall, the library's chief operating officer, who at the beginning of her tenure toured all the system's branches. The first time it happened, she had the same reaction any library lover would: There’s an apartment here? Maybe I could live in the apartment. "They would say, look, just be careful when you go up there," she says. "It was wild. You could have this gorgeous Carnegie…" "And then… surprise!" says Risa Honig, the library's head of capital planning.
From Inside the New York Public Library's Last, Secret Apartments | Atlas Obscura
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WA State Dems push to unblock LGBT material at schools, libraries

Several House Democrats have put forward legislation that would ban schools and libraries from banning Internet access to LGBT material, which is sometimes blocked by filters aimed at keeping out obscene content. The "Don't Block LGBTQ Act," from Rep. Mike Honda, D-Calif., is meant to ensure that young LGBT people are able to access material that might help them.
From Dems push to unblock LGBT material at schools, libraries | Washington Examiner
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“That’s a library? I thought it was a church for a religion that didn’t allow makeup.”

But then. Maybe librarians shouldn’t try to be, maybe the library should be a place where one can focus on the written word, where people can enter the inner conversation instead of the mundane blabber. The library as a place to connect with someone far away (the author) and someone deep inside (the mental model of the reader); the library as a church instead of just another social space.
From The Library and the Church – lib{cache
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Why Libraries’ Survival Matters

In advance of “Do Libraries Have a Future?” a Zócalo Public Square event in partnership with WeHo Reads, we asked eight writers to reflect on the most memorable library they ever visited, what it meant to them, and whether it should exist in 100 years.
From Why Libraries’ Survival Matters | PublicCEO
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The media of our expression seems to have decreasing longevity.

This experience set me to thinking again about the ephemeral nature of our artifacts and the possibility that the centuries well before ours will be better known than ours will be unless we are persistent about preserving digital content. The earlier media seem to have a kind of timeless longevity while modern media from the 1800s forward seem to have shrinking lifetimes. Just as the monks and Muslims of the Middle Ages preserved content by copying into new media, won't we need to do the same for our modern content?
From 'We're Going Backward!' | October 2016 | Communications of the ACM
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