Libraries

Phoenix Central Library Closed Until June 2018

After suffering major damage during a monsoon storm, Burton Barr Library, the main library of the Phoenix Public Library will remain closed until June 2018. On July 15, 2017, high winds lifted the roof of the library causing the rupture of a fire-sprinkler pipe on the top floor. Torrents of water flooded the building before the system was shut off.

Earlier today, AZCentral released new information that city employees knew about the condition of the pipe for at least three years, but nothing was done to fix it.

Photos and more at AZCentral.

During Your MTA Commute...

...you can now read e-books courtesy of a new program called Subway Library, sponsored by the NY, Brooklyn and Queens libraries and enabled by wi-fi throughout the NYC subway transit system.

A choice of pretty good selections too, many with NYC themes.

Libraries Clear First Budget Hurdle in DC

From Publishers Weekly:

Last week, a House Appropriations subcommittee voted to recommend level funding for libraries in FY2018, which would mean roughly $231 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), $183 million for the Library Services and Technology Act, and $27 million for the Innovative Approaches to Literacy (IAL) program.

The vote comes after President Trump in May doubled down on his call to eliminate IMLS and virtually all federal funding for libraries, as well as a host of other vital agencies, including the National Endowments for the Arts and the Humanities.

ALA president Jim Neal called the subcommittee vote “one important step in the lengthy congressional appropriations process,” but a development that nevertheless shows that “elected officials are listening to us and recognize libraries’ importance in the communities they represent.”

Phoenix's Burton Barr Cebral Library Damaged by Sprinklers

From AZ Central an explanation and video of how the sprinkler system was set off by an atypical monsoon on Saturday.

Phoenix Fire Capt. Reda Bigler said a pipe in the ceiling of the building's fifth floor ruptured when the storm lifted the roof and caused it to move in a wave-like fashion.

“When (the roof) slammed back down it broke a sprinkler pipe," Bigler said. “That caused about 50 to 60 gallons a minute of water to start flowing through the building." All five stories were affected.

Absense of Sound --a Librarian's Story

From the July/August issue of the Saturday Evening Post a selection fron author N. West Moss's new story collection, focusing on a day in the life of a librarian at the Bryant Park NYPL .

N. West Moss was the winner of the Post’s 2015 Great American Fiction Contest for “Omeer’s Mangoes,” which, with “Absence of Sound,” appears in her first short-story collection, The Subway Stops at Bryant Park (Leapfrog Press, 2017). This story first appeared in Neworld Review. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Salon, McSweeney’s, and Brevity, among others.

There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be

These shelves exist because poet and novelist Richard Brautigan described a library of unpublished books in his 1971 novel, The Abortion: An Historical Romance. And 27 years ago in Vermont, a man named Todd Lockwood decided he would create the library for real. Lockwood fielded submissions from as far away as Saudia Arabia but in 1995, he ran out of money. The collection was orphaned until 2010, when John Barber, a Brautigan scholar, arranged to have the library brought to a new Vancouver home.
From There’s a Library in Vancouver Full of Hundreds of Books That Have Never Been Published, And Never Will Be - Willamette Week
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Confessions of a Librarian Who Does Everything Wrong

“How do you do inventory if you can’t close the library because you’re letting kids take books out for the summer?” The criticism in the other school librarian’s voice was not even trying to veil itself behind a smile. “I don’t do inventory,” I admitted. “I mean, there were some kids eating lunch in the library a couple years ago, and they asked if they could take books out for the summer, and that got me thinking…” My voice trailed off at the sight of her expression. “They eat lunch in the library?” she asked. I suddenly found myself, once again, under the weight of heavy judgment. I am always doing things “wrong” in the library. But sometimes it’s worth doing the wrong things for the right reasons–especially when our right reasons are our students Full article
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Do 20 pages of a book gives you 90% of its words?

My English teacher claimed, that if I survive the first 20 pages of any book, the reading will get much easier because the words that occurred on those pages constitute 90% of all words in the book. So after you reach this threshold you don’t have to go back and forth to the dictionary. Was he right? (TLDR: Kind of.)
From Do 20 pages of a book gives you 90% of its words? – Vocapouch
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What do protests about Harry Potter books teach us?

According to scholar Christine Jenkins, people who try to censor texts often hold a set of false assumptions about how reading works. One of those assumptions is that particular literary content (like positive portrayals of witchcraft) will invariably produce particular effects (more witches in real life). Another is that reactions to a particular text are likely to be consistent across readers. In other words, if one reader finds a passage scary, funny or offensive, the assumption is that other readers invariably will do so as well.
From What do protests about Harry Potter books teach us? - Salon.com

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