Literacy

Reading Creates 'Simulations' In Minds

A study provides new insights about what's going on in your head when you crack open a good book. Jeff Zacks, associate professor of psychology at Washington University in St. Louis, talks about the study.

Listen to full piece on NPR

The Word of the Day Is Ex Libris

Today's Word-of-the-Day from Wordsmith.com is ex libris (from the library), but there's also a mention of spam and where it's heading (it would be nice if it was heading in the opposite direction of our inboxes...surely you've heard from Mariam Abachha in the last few years).

Here's the link to subscribe to A.Word.A.Day.

The real reason Americans don't read

The real reason Americans don't read
The truth is that the decline of reading for pleasure has little to do with the things that teachers, librarians and parents seem to think are causing it. The majority of American adults are literate, and high school English curriculums are meant to teach them to analyze literature, not enjoy it. (It's a wonder even as many as half of Americans still enjoy reading after being subjected to "The Scarlet Letter.") The reasons are more complex than that, and it's not at all clear that better education or higher literacy would change Americans' reading habits.

Unlike, say, watching a movie, reading a book is necessarily a private experience.

Adults Reading More Fiction

For the first time since 1982, "the proportion of adults 18 and older who said they had read at least one novel, short story, poem or play in the previous 12 months has risen [to 50.2%]," according to a National Endowment for the Arts study being released today, reported by the New York Times.

The increase was most notable among 18-24 year olds and involved novels and short stories more than poetry or drama. Literary reading also increased among Hispanic Americans.

For the first time, the study included Internet reading, which some thought might have helped boost rates, although the AAP's Pat Schroeder suggested that some people don't count reading online or on e-readers as "book" reading.

Other possible explanations for the jump: one community, one read programs; the popularity of the Harry Potter and Twilight series; and "individual efforts of teachers, librarians, parents and civic leaders" to promote literature and reading. Booksellers, too, we'd think.

The study is called "Reading on the Rise: A New Chapter in American Literacy" and is based on data from the Census Bureau compiled last year.

Donkeys boost Ethiopian literacy

It may be low-tech (and decidedly green) but it works, according to this BBC story about donkey powered mobile library sevices.

"If you leave them practising their letters and walk out through the garden gate, you will find another group of children, clustered under a shady tree, absorbed in their books.

Parked alongside them is a brightly painted wooden cart, with sides which fold down to display the shelves of books.

The two donkeys which pull it are resting in another patch of shade.

This is Ethiopia's first Donkey Mobile Library - the brainchild of an expatriate Ethiopian now living in the United States."

Muslims Removed from AirTran Flight included an LOC Attorney

Along with the families of Atif Irfan, a tax attorney, and his brother Kashif Irfan, an anesthesiologist, employees at AirTran Airways at Reagan Airport outside Washington DC also removed a family friend, Abdul Aziz. Aziz is a Library of Congress attorney (according to LinkedIn, he is a "Legal Information Analyst at Library of Congress") who was coincidentally taking the same flight and had been seen talking with the family. Story from CNN.

Further analysis on this incident from Dan Gilgoff of U.S. News and World Report, whose article is entitled "Does Muslim Family Booted From Plane Strengthen Case for Religious Literacy?"

Declining U.S. Newspaper Circulation Potentially Signals Decline In Literacy

Americans are doing less well than global competitors on a key index of literacy, according to a literacy survey by Central Connecticut State University.

From All Headline News: This study attempts to capture one critical index of our nation's well-being -- the literacy of its major cities--by focusing on six key indicators of literacy: newspaper circulation, number of bookstores, library resources, periodical publishing resources, educational attainment, and Internet resources. The information is compared against population rates in each city to develop a per capita profile of the city's "long-term literacy"-a set of factors measuring the ways people use their literacy-and thus presents a large-scale portrait of our nation's cultural vitality," Dr. Jack Miller, CCSU President says.

On Obama's Pick for Secy of Education and Learning to Read

President-elect Barack Obama has chosen Arne Duncan to be the next Secretary of Education.

Gary Stager, "teacher educator, education journalist, speaker, school reformer" is not happy with the choice of Duncan, whose appointment he considers to be just another 'social promotion'.

CEO of Hooked on Phonics, Judy L. Harris, is not happy with what Gary Stager had to say about the appointment; specifically, ""Gary Stager is entitled to his opinions regarding President-elect Obama's selection of Arne Duncan as Secretary of Education and education policy generally. However, it is unfortunate he has tried to trivialize my views by likening my company and its product -- Hooked on Phonics, a product that has helped millions of children learn to read -- to a sponge (with all due respect to the folks at ShamWow). " Here's the rest of her statement.

Reader, Beware

A eulogy for the printed page, and civilization as we know it.

Information literacy- Defending Vaccines: Actress Dispels Link To Autism

A movie star and a prominent scientist have teamed up to reassure the public that childhood vaccines are safe and do not cause autism.

Amanda Peet, who starred in films including The X-Files: I Want To Believe and Syriana, is working with Paul Offit, the chief of infectious diseases at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Their goal is to counter the assault on vaccines led by celebrities including Jenny McCarthy, Jim Carrey and Holly Robinson Peete.

Full story on Morning Edition on NPR

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