Literacy

Raising Kids Who Want To Read

In his new book, Raising Kids Who Read, Daniel Willingham wants to be clear: There's a big difference between teaching kids to read and teaching them to love reading.

And Willingham, a parent himself, doesn't champion reading for the obvious reasons — not because research suggests that kids who read for pleasure do better in school and in life.

"The standard things you'll hear about why kids should read I actually don't think are very strong arguments," he says. "Because if the goal is to become a good citizen or the goal is to make a lot of money, I can think of more direct ways to reach those goals than to read during your leisure time."

Full piece here:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2015/03/17/387774026/q-a-raising-kids-who-want-to-read

What Reading Does for the Mind

Lack of exposure and practice on the part of the less skilled reader delays the development of automaticity and speed at the word recognition level. Slow, capacity-draining word recognition processes require cognitive resources that should be allocated to comprehension. Thus, reading for meaning is hindered; unrewarding reading experiences multiply; and practice is avoided or merely tolerated without real cognitive involvement.

From What Reading
Does for the Mind
[PDF Link]
Via Reddit

About First Book

Another story via National Public Radio about First Book and their continuing goal of introducing young children to the pleasures of reading and owning books.

When it comes to learning to read, educators agree: the younger, the better. Children can be exposed to books even before they can talk, but for that a family has to have books, which isn't always the case.

There are neighborhoods in this country with plenty of books; and then there are neighborhoods where books are harder to find. Almost 15 years ago, Susan Neuman, now a professor at New York University, focused on that discrepancy, in a study that looked at just how many books were available in Philadelphia's low-income neighborhoods. The results were startling.

"We found a total of 33 books for children in a community of 10,000 children. ... Thirty-three books in all of the neighborhood," she says. By comparison, there were 300 books per child in the city's affluent communities. Neuman recently updated her study. She hasn't yet released those findings but says not much has changed.

And according to Neuman, despite advances in technology, access to print books is still important because reading out loud creates an emotional link between parent and child.

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Common Core Reading: The High Achievers

Linnea Wolters was prepared to hate the Common Core State Standards.

She taught fifth grade at a low-income school in Reno, Nev., where, she says, there was always some new plan to improve things. And none of it added up to good education. But, after leading her class through a Core-aligned lesson — a close reading of Emma Lazarus' sonnet "The New Colossus" — she was intrigued, especially by the way different students reacted to the process.

Part 2 in a four-part series on reading in the Common Core era.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/11/13/356358135/common-core-reading-the-high-achievers

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For Dyslexics, A Font And A Dictionary That Are Meant To Help

A designer who has dyslexia has created a font to help dyslexic readers navigate text designing letters in a way that avoids confusion and add clarity. Two English researchers are making a dictionary that favors meaning over the alphabet.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/11/11/363293514/for-dyslexics-a-font-and-a-dictiona...

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Viewers respond to mandated extra reading at Florida schools

PBS viewers respond to a recent signature piece examining Florida’s new law requiring low-performing elementary schools to provide an extra hour of reading every day. Hari Sreenivasan reads your comments.

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No Devices, No Talking...Just Silence and Reading

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Book News: Millennials Reading More Than Older Americans, Study Finds

Young Americans are more likely to have read a book in the past year than their older counterparts, a new study finds.

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/09/11/347620935/book-news-millennials-reading-more-...

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