Amazon.com

Amazon strikes deal with Simon & Schuster on e-book prices

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Mon, 10/20/2014 - 23:22

Online book retailer Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O) said on Monday it has signed a multi-year deal with Simon & Schuster Inc, the second Big-Five book publisher, on the future price of e-books.

Amazon, which had been in talks with Simon & Schuster since July over pricing, confirmed the deal first reported by the Business Insider news blog that the two had reached an agreement.

http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/10/21/us-amazon-com-deals-idINKCN0I9…

Are Amazon exclusives the next big challenge for everybody else in publishing?

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 09/24/2014 - 23:07
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Somebody smarter (or more patient about wading through data) than I am could probably figure out how far along this bifurcation is already, but Amazon is doing its very best to build a body of content that is desirable and available from nobody else but them.

David Lankes comments on Kindle Unlimited

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Thu, 07/31/2014 - 11:48
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Excerpt: Perhaps, you may think, I am an ivory tower academic blind to the coming disruptive change…like when the Internet was going to put libraries out of business… then Google…then Netflix…then Yahoo! Answers. Here’s the plain truth: there is a HUGE disruptive change happening in libraries, and it is facilitated by things like Google and Kindle Unlimited. Libraries are shifting from collection-focused buildings to centers of innovation focused on communities. If you think of libraries as places filled with books, you are in for a bit of a shock.

Librarians, Media React to Launch of Kindle Unlimited

Submitted by Bibliofuture on Wed, 07/30/2014 - 00:03

Excerpt: “I’m enough of a realist to assume that consumers will gravitate to the cheapest, most convenient source of content, whether that’s Amazon or the public library,” said Jimmy Thomas, executive director of Colorado’s Marmot Library Network. “Amazon continues to set a high standard of convenience libraries should attend to. And every time this huge corporation does something on a massive scale, libraries should be reminded to approach services differently. Competing with Amazon on its own terms is not a good direction for libraries.

Amazon Isn't Killing Writing, the Market Is

Submitted by Blake on Sat, 07/19/2014 - 16:06

"Driving the prices lower isn't likely to expand the market of readers, since book prices don't seem to be the deciding factor on whether someone reads a book (time is). But those lower prices directly shrink the incomes of authors, who lack any other means of translating their sales into additional revenue. "

http://news.slashdot.org/story/14/07/19/139219/amazon-isnt-killing-writ…