Online Privacy

Are your mobile apps spying on you?

Are your mobile apps spying on you?
Why is this a big deal? Because phone numbers are some of the most personal information available about anyone. They are a semi-permanent unique identification number that also serves as a direct way to reach you at all times. Giving someone else your number means you trust them to not abuse it, call you at 3 a.m. for no reason, or spray paint it on a restroom wall.

But can you trust these Web apps -- especially those that grab your numbers without asking -- to not abuse it? The answer is that we shouldn't have to. Maybe now, thanks to the Path debacle, we won't.

5 Key Points From Google's Privacy-Policy Letter to Congress

5 Key Points From Google's Privacy-Policy Letter to Congress
Point No. 1: Google still isn't selling your personal data.
Point No. 2: You're still up the creek if you get reeled in by a phishing scam.
Point No. 3: You can still use Google and YouTube for searching without Google knowing that you are the one doing the search.
Point No. 4: Users still have lots of options over how they're tracked across the Web.
Point No. 5: If you don't love the new integrated Google, you can always leave it.

How does Google's new privacy policy compare?

How does Google's new privacy policy compare?
The fact of the matter is, Google doesn't appear to be doing anything worse than what companies likeApple, Microsoft, Yahoo, and Facebook have doing for years. It's just that Google has taken arguably unprecedented pains to alert the public of imminent changes to its privacy policies and has made the new policy approachable enough for the average person to read it. (Or skim it. Or skim what someone else wrote about it after skimming it.)

Facebook’s Settlement With FTC Confirmed: Privacy Changes Must Be Opt In

Facebook’s Settlement With FTC Confirmed: Privacy Changes Must Be Opt In
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg just issued a statement on the Facebook Blog confirming that his company has settled with the FTC over charges that it has violated user privacy over the year. Facebook is now “required to obtain consumers’ affirmative express consent before enacting changes that override their privacy preferences”, effectively making all future privacy control changes opt in. Facebook must also submit to privacy audits every 2 years for the next 20 years, bar access to content on deactivated accounts, and avoid misrepresenting the privacy or security of user data. The settlement will hinder Facebook’s ability to release new products, as users are typically resistant to change and may be reluctant to opt in to new privacy controls.

How Facebook is ruining sharing

How Facebook is ruining sharing

"Sharing and recommendation shouldn't be passive. It should be conscious, thoughtful, and amusing--we are tickled by a story, picture, or video and we choose to share it, and if a startling number of Internet users also find that thing amusing, we, together, consciously create a tidal wave of meme that elevates that piece of media to viral status. We choose these gems from the noise. Open Graph will fill our feeds with noise, burying the gems."

Citizenship vs. Consumerism: Occupy the Net!

"Reading anonymously doesn't look deviant yet--but things will change as we bypass public libraries and start borrowing books from Amazon and Barnes & Noble. The former would never think of selling our data to third parties; the latter wouldn't think twice about it. In fact, they would give us coupons for sharing our reading habits."

http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/future_tense/2011/11/salman_rushdie_and_facebook_s_...

Your personal information is valuable you should hoard it

Keep Yourself Privately Held
Your personal information is valuable. It is so valuable that companies are doing everything they can to gain more information about you. Since it is valuable, you should hoard it. The more difficult it is to acquire your personal information, the more valuable it becomes, and the better return you will get when you commoditize the information.

Libraries Be careful what your web sites Like

Libraries: Be careful what your web sites “Like”
So if any of your web sites (especially your online catalogs or other discovery and delivery services) use third party web services, consider carefully where and how they’re being invoked. For each third party, you should ask what information they can get from users browsing your web site, what other information they have from other sources (like the “real names” and exact birthdates that sites like Facebook and Google+ demand), and what real guarantees, if any, they make about the privacy of the information. If you can’t easily get satisfactory answers to these questions, then reconsider your use of these services.

Setting Boundaries for Internet Privacy

Setting Boundaries for Internet Privacy
For 18 months, the European Commission has been considering how to put into practice a 2009 law that regulates software cookies, the unique digital markers that Web sites place on visiting computers to identify consumers and deliver ads tailored to individual interests.

This year, a consensus appeared to be building in Brussels for letting the online advertising industry regulate its use of cookies.

Just Give Me the Right to Be Forgotten

Just Give Me the Right to Be Forgotten some politicians, regulators and companies want to give Americans more control over their personal information — with limits on data use and retention, says Christopher Wolf, a lawyer who specializes in privacy and the co-chairman of the Future of Privacy Forum in Washington.

“We need to move more toward that regime in order to empower consumers,” Mr. Wolf says. But any limits, he emphasizes, would have to carefully balance personal privacy against the right to free speech and public access to information.

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