Online Privacy

Welcome to the Speakularity, Where Everything You Say Is Transcribed and Searchable

We are going to start recording and automatically transcribing most of what we say. Instead of evaporating into memory, words spoken aloud will calcify as text, into a Record that will be referenced, searched, and mined. It will happen by our standard combination of willing and allowing. It will happen because it can. It will happen sooner than we think.

From Welcome to the Speakularity, Where Everything You Say Is Transcribed and Searchable

The Library Digital Privacy Pledge of 2015

The Pledge for Libraries:
1. We will make every effort to ensure that web services and information resources under direct control of our library will use HTTPS within six months. [ dated______ ]
2. Starting in 2016, our library will assure that any new or renewed contracts for web services or information resources will require support for HTTPS by the end of 2016.

From The Library Digital Privacy Pledge of 2015 - Google Docs

The Illusion of Online Privacy

Enjoying true privacy is difficult in today's digital age, but it won't get easier if people give up on their right to a few personal secrets, Reitman says.  

"People are starting to be so frustrated about privacy that they believe they can't get anything better," she says. "We have to push back against that idea.“

From The Illusion of Online Privacy - US News

It's not too late to reclaim our online privacy

How did we get here? Data has become currency: we barter it for services from operating systems to music players, while accepting promises of personalisation and assurances of security from those to whom we entrust it.

That trust is misplaced. Silicon Valley is built on data trading, and its products reflect that. Webmail isn’t encrypted; that would stop lucrative ads. Apps don’t tell us what they’re doing. Ad-trackers stalk you as you browse. And instead of real security, we are exhorted to strengthen our passwords – which is unintuitive and largely futile.

From It's not too late to reclaim our online privacy | New Scientist

Apple’s content blocking is chemo for the cancer of adtech

This means the iOS platform will now support developers who want to build sophisticated apps that give users ways to block stuff they don’t like, such as adtech tracking and various forms of advertising — or all advertising — and to do it privately.

This allows much more control over unwanted content than is provided currently by ad and tracking blockers on Web browsers, and supports this control at the system level, rather than at the browser level. (Though it is executed by the browser.)

From Doc Searls Weblog · Apple’s content blocking is chemo for the cancer of adtech

The Ashley Madison Hack Should Scare You, Too

Likewise, those who blithely state “privacy is dead” as if they have no skin in the game, as if merely shrugging and accepting that we no longer have any rights as individuals, may be the most disheartening of all. Are we ready to agree that we, as citizens, have no recourse, that it’s perfectly natural that criminals and the corporate entities that fail to protect us from them would mishandle our assets and expose us all to fraud and identity theft and public attacks? Do we want our public servants targeting citizens by using information gained through criminal means?

From The Ashley Madison Hack Should Scare You, Too -- The Cut

Monica at Mozilla: Tracking Protection for Firefox at Web 2.0 Security and Privacy 2015

Advertising does not make content free. It merely externalizes the costs in a way that incentivizes malicious or incompetent players to build things like Superfish, infect 1 in 20 machines with ad injection malware, and create sites that require unsafe plugins and take twice as many resources to load, quite expensive in terms of bandwidth, power, and stability.

From Monica at Mozilla: Tracking Protection for Firefox at Web 2.0 Security and Privacy 2015

Librarians Versus the NSA

Macrina, 30, is not your grandmother's librarian. She has a kaleidoscopic illustration from a Mother Goose book tattooed on her arm, occasionally poses for selfies in red lipstick, and wears a small piece of hardware called a security token around her neck like a pendant. Macrina has worked as a public librarian for nearly a decade, but she's not shelving books; she's fighting Big Brother.

From Librarians Versus the NSA | The Nation

Schneier on Security: AT&T Charging Customers to Not Spy on Them

I have mixed feelings about this. On one hand, AT&T is forgoing revenue by not spying on its customers, and it's reasonable to charge them for that lost revenue. On the other hand, this sort of thing means that privacy becomes a luxury good. In general, I prefer to conceptualize privacy as a right to be respected and not a commodity to be bought and sold.

From Schneier on Security: AT&T Charging Customers to Not Spy on Them

Privacy is at a crossroads. Choose wisely.

We already put legal limits on financial, medical, military, transportation, telecommunications and agriculture technology. Why not online tracking? With digital technology making its way into more parts of our lives, and with our data quickly becoming more and more valuable, of course there should be some limits on online tracking!

From Privacy is at a crossroads. Choose wisely. — Medium

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