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Google of Archives Stories

Library of Congress has 5 million U.S. history items online. The 5 million images belong to a project called \"American Memory,\" available at loc.gov.

Meanwhile, USC has nearly $2 million worth of Ernest Hemingway\'s letters. Now the USC where students and researchers can study how authors develop their ideas and their works. \"I\'m still giddy about it,\" professor Matthew Bruccoli said. Denver Post Story

Also, More than 150 copies of the complete legal papers of Abraham Lincoln will soon be going out to law schools across the country, thanks to a grant received recently by The Lincoln Legal Papers research project. Full Story.

Thanks to Bob Cox for most of these.

Library to halt sale of historic journals

Charles Davis writes \"The British Library has suspended sales of historic newspapers after a public outcry.
It had disposed of up to 60,000 bound volumes of newspapers in
unpublicised deals in the past four years. All the newspapers were foreign.
The library said it had not broken its legal obligation to collect and maintain
British printed material.
The library, caught out by the controversy, said yesterday that it would make
no further disposals until it had undertaken \"a complete review of microfilm copies\". The recent disposals include long runs of newspapers from most
European countries, the United States, Latin America and pre-revolutionary
Russia.
Story from \"Daily Telegraph\" 24 November 2000
http://www.telegraph.co.uk

Save the front page

Alert reader Charles Davis suggested This Story from Telegraph.co.uk.

When the British Library decided to get rid of a historic archive of American newspapers Nicholson Baker was bought it for himself. Now he wants to save \'the raw store of history\' that microfilm and the internet are wiping out. He is also the one who sued the San Francisco Public Library under the Freedom of Information act to release details of its \"hate crime against the past\" a few years ago when they went on the book dumping binge.

\"Say your grandparents had a wedding picture in this paper: what difference would it make to you if you saw the actual paper, instead of printing it off microfilm? The first would link you directly to that past event - it\'s difficult to explain why that would be true, but it is. The past exerts a stronger pull, it becomes realer, more understandable somehow when you have the actual document and not a copy.\"

National Archives Week

I don\'t know how I missed it, but this is National Archives Week!

Archives Week is an annual, weeklong observance of the importance of archival and historical records to our lives.

Just so you don\'t miss it in the coming years:

ARCHIVES WEEK DATES, 2000-2003

October 8-15, 2000
October 7-14, 2001
October 6-13, 2002
October 5-12, 2003

Give your favorite archivist a Big Kiss!

National Archives and Records Administration

Challenges face Library of Congress

Philly.com has
a short but sweet interview with curator Harry Katz at LOC on the troubles with preservation these days.

\"As society becomes more digitalized, the library is increasingly looking at computer capacity as much as warehouse space in planning its future needs. \"One problem is the hardware,\" Katz said. \"Technology moves so fast that in a few years today\'s computers may be obsolete. No use keeping the disks if they can\'t be read. How much equipment do we have to preserve, too?\"\"

Interesting point I never considered, now they must save computers in order to read the disks in the future.

The Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

The
Smithsonian Institution at the turn of the 20th century

is a look back at how things were a couple hundred years ago
at The Smithsonian. It\'s full of cool old photos and info
for all you history buffs.

Radical Archives

The Boston Herald has an interesting Archives Story. It seems that Brandeis and Clark universities are afraid of the writings and memorabilia of Abbie Hoffman. Instead they will be kept at the University of Connecticut, which has no connection to the late Chicago Sevenster.

``Good Lord, why didn\'t they give it to Brandeis?\'\' asked Boston University professor Joseph Boskin, who lectures on the counterculture and regards Hoffman as a hero. ``They (probably) didn\'t want to be associated with Abbie Hoffman. Maybe his ethics offended them. What other reason might there be?\'\'

Archiving Today\'s Digital Culture

Foxnews is carrying a Story on The 10,000-year Library Conference, hosted by The Long Now Foundation and Stanford University Libraries. They discussed how today\'s archival institutions will cope with preserving multimedia content such as digital audio and video files, photography, databases, Web pages and even links to related content. They say that most libraries are making a new \"digital library\" online, to preserve the information. This of course raises many new issues...

Risk Management of Digital Information

R Hadden wrote: \"Risk Management of Digital Information: A File Format Investigation.\" by Gregory W. Lawrence et al. It is impossible today to guarantee the longevity and legibility of digital information for even one human generation. The choices are: to physically preserve the format, to emulate the data, or to migrate the digital data. All these choices have risks. In 1998 the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) asked Cornell University to study the risk management for migrating several different common file formats. This report is the result of their studies, and is a practical guide to assess the risks associated with migrating electronic files in various formats. File migration is prone to generating errors, and this report provides practical tools to quantify these risks, get the .pdf file atClir.org

Digital emulation, preservation or migration

R Hadden Writes :

\"Risk Management of Digital Information: A File Format Investigation.\" by Gregory W. Lawrence et al. It is impossible today to guarantee the longevity and legibility of digital information for even one human generation. The choices are: to physically preserve the format, to emulate the data, or to migrate the digital data. All these choices have risks.

You can see the PDF file at Clir.org

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