Archives

British Library acquires archive beyond compare

The Gaurdian in the UK has this story on the vast archive of the actor and director Laurence Olivier.

\"The British Library has acquired the vast archive of the actor and director Laurence Olivier, it announced yesterday.
The avalanche of paper reveals a man who knew he was marked for greatness and began to hoard evidence for his life history from his early teenage years.\" -- Read More

New digital archive at MIT

news.excite.com carried a story on
Hewlett-Packard and the MIT Libraries. They announced a $1.8 million joint project to build a digital archive at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that could serve as a model for other universities.
The archive will be capable of holding the approximately 10,000 articles produced by MIT authors annually, including a large amount of multimedia content. -- Read More

Archivists lose on appeal

The Boston Herald was one of many papers in the U.S. to pick up on this story.

A group of historians and librarians who oppose a rule that lets federal agencies destroy computer records as long as they keep a copy on paper or microfilm lost a Supreme Court appeal today.

The court, without comment, turned away an appeal in which the librarians and historians argued that paper records cannot be searched and indexed as easily as electronic records. -- Read More

Data Preservation in the Digital Age

David Fiander writes \"The folks over at slashdot are getting all excited about a a story about a new paper out of UMich that talks about the problems of data preservation in the digital age. As if it\'s a new problem, and not just a seriously exacerbated one \"

From Slashdot\"Recently there was an Ask Slashdot about the the problem of preserving digital material. The basic idea was that we are creating a massive wealth of digital information, but have no clear plan for preserving it. What happens to all of those poems I write when I try to access them for my grandkids? What about the pictures of my kids I took with that digital camera? Can I still get to them in time to embarrass them in the future?

Old computers threat to records

The BBC has a story on how computers will start to decompose with important records.


Vital archaeological records could be
lost forever because the computers
they are stored on become quickly
obsolete.

The physical site is nearly always
completely destroyed during a dig,
but archaeologists claim the
knowledge they glean from the
ground is then available for posterity.\"The irony is that archaeological
information held in magnetic format
is decaying faster than it ever did in
the ground,\" warns William Kilbride of
the Archaeology Data Service (ADS)
at the University of York. -- Read More

Archivists grapple with digital pace

Boston.com has an exciting archivist
Story on the troubles facing todays archivists.

Actually, the biggest problem is one scholars and archivists already confront. It\'s not an excess of access but the reverse. For the wonderful world of digitized information and on line everything has a dark archival underbelly: The more sophisticated information technology becomes, and the more readily accessible in the present, the harder it is to preserve and the less accessible it becomes in the future.

Stanford Project to Test Method for Preserving Dig

Infodude writes \"To assuage fears about the permanence of articles published in electronic journals, Stanford University researchers will test a computerized variation on an age-old archiving strategy: Make lots of copies, and keep them in different locations.

http://www.chronicle.com/free/2000/02/2000021001t.htm \"

Jazz Discovery at Library of Congress

gsandler writes "

Here is a
story from the New York Times on the discovery by the Library of Congress of a
previously unknown recording of the Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane.
There are very few recordings of this period of John Coltrane's career. "During this period, Coltrane fully collected himself as an improviser, challenged by Monk and the discipline of his unusual harmonic sense. Thus began the 10-year sprint during which he changed jazz completely, before his death in 1967."
(Registration at the NY Times web site is required.)

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