Help build a Web Archive of the Sept 11 Attack is working with The Internet Archive in collaboration with the Library of Congress to identify and archive pages and sites related to the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington on September 11, 2001. They want to be sure that there is a solid historical record of this time.

They are asking for volunteers to help them identify any web sites or pages that have information or content about the Sep11 Attack. They are especially interested in finding sites by individuals -- that record their feelings, experiences or opinions. They are also especially interested in finding non-American sites.

Go to: for all the details.

Archiving the Past, but Embracing the Future

From the New York Times, a biography/informational article about Rodney Phillips, the director of the Humanities and Social Services Library at NYPL.

JOHN KIFNER writes: \"This is an amazing edifice, built to honor education and culture,\" Mr. Phillips said. \"I was so lucky to get that job out of library school.\"

Full Story

Bush Delays Release of Reagan Records Again

The Associated Press reports:

For the third time, the Bush administration has delayed release of 68,000 pages of Ronald Reagan\'s White House records, including vice presidential papers from President Bush\'s father. The papers were to have come out in January, 12 years after Reagan left office as provided under law. The White House delayed the release to June 21, then to the last day in August.

On Friday, White House counsel Alberto Gonzales sought a third extension, this time with no deadline, so the administration can review the records and consult representatives of former presidents Reagan, Bush and Clinton . . . ``I think it\'s a scandal to hold them back,\'\' Anna Nelson, a historian at American University, said Friday. ``I think the whole point of the Presidential Records Act is to open documents. It goes against the spirit of the law.\'\'

More via the New York Times.

Archival entrepreneur gains leadership honor

Someone writes \"Wayne State University recognizes librarian/archivist by naming her recipient of Emerging Corporate Leadership Award. Article also discusses archival services conducted by her company, which are somewhat unique to the archival world.

Also, a rather non-traditional article for you to include. Most of your material cited relate to \"mainstream\" librarianship. This services as just another reminder of how versatile librarians/archivists can be.

Full Story from Detroit News \"

FDR Presidential Library

Anne Gometz writes \"This two part article in NARA\'s Prologue magazine recounts the history of the first Presidential Library including why it is called a \"library\" rather than an archives. \"

Until Roosevelt, Presidents leaving office routinely took their papers with them. George Washington set the precedent in 1797 when he took his files home with him to Mount Vernon, with the hope—never fulfilled—of building a library to house them.

Subduing the Paper Chase ?

Federal Computer Week reports on the National Archives\' antiquated and ineffectual National Personnel Records Center:

Requests for veterans’ records pour in to the National Personnel Records Center at a rate of 6,000 a day. But the records center, a massive warehouse in St. Louis, is ill-equipped to handle the demand. In an age when agencies such as the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration can share electronic records almost instantly, the National Personnel Records Center still operates much as it did when it opened in 1955. . . On average, it takes workers at the records center 54 days to respond to written requests for records. But sometimes it takes years.

Preserving our 21st century digital heritage

This interesting feature from ABC News takes a detailed look at the issues surrounding the need to preserve the mass of information now being produced in digital form. It looks at efforts made by the Library of Congress and initiatives such as The Internet Archive to find ways of capturing this part of our cultural heritage and storing it for posterity. An excellent story with lots of useful links.

\"If somebody were to try to write a dissertation today about the Web in 1994, say, they would be hard-pressed to find the kind of archival primary materials that they\'d want.\"

What’s Important?

AbcNews is running an Interesting Story on issues facing the preservation sector.
They managed to avoid Baker in this one somehow.

\"In 20 years, we will try to find first editions of their works, and we will look for their papers on the market,\" she says. \"If they have stuff on disk, and we collect their disks, that means we have to have technology to be able to read their disks. … We\'re still buying Mark Twain letters. We haven\'t really grappled with somebody from the [19]90s yet.\"

3 Million Pounds of History

A great profile in the New York Times of the trials, travails, and impressive holdings of the Municipal Archives of the City of New York.

The collection — three million pounds of material, ranging from the original 1654 Dutch sales slip for the purchase of Coney Island, to a trove of stereoscopic Victorian pornography assembled by an antivice crusader — has weathered centuries of profound neglect. It has been appallingly lodged in a succession of makeshift spaces, including a city pier and the attic of a fire-prone pizza parlor. . .an improbable thing has happened as archivists have made these records available to scholars in recent years: New York City\'s history has been rewritten.

Mr. Gates\' Xanadu

Ryan writes: \"Interesting article from front page of (the early edition, the one I bought at the subway station on Saturday afternoon) Sunday\'s New York Times on the burying of the Bettmann photo archives in Pennsylvania for the remote/merely-theoretical(?) enjoyment of the generations to come. Raises the question of archives for archives\' sake, why have \'em if we can\'t use \'em, private property vs. public\'s claim on cultural legacy. I didn\'t know much about the state of the Bettmann archives before I read this--

Full NY Times Story \"


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