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Museums & Libraries Want 9/11 Artifacts

Museums and libraries around the country are hoping to get their hands on artifacts from the September 11 terrorist attacks. The items range from personal memorabilia from victims and survivors, to makeshift flags, cards, notes, photographs, and more. The Smithsonian may receive $5 million in order to collect and preserve the items. A web site may also be created where people from all over the country can submit the email that they sent on that day. More

Coca Cola Fizzes Over New Archive

John Geralds writes...
\"Coca Cola is building an online digital media archive, which will make it the first company to move an entire advertising and brand history to an online digital media environment.
The archive will include everything from the very first press ad, which appeared in 1886, to the famous 1970s Coca Cola Hilltop commercial that featured the \'I\'d Like To Buy The World a Coke jingle.\' The system will bring together more than 9,000 graphical images, over 7,000 text documents and an advertising library which will ultimately contain more than 25,000 television ads and corporate videos.\" More

Research library top collections include Black press

From Black
Voices
:

\"We asked Bernard Reilly, president of The Center
for Research Libraries, to list his facility\'s 10 most
interesting collections. Here is the list, and his
comments.\"

The list includes The African-American Press
Collection, Khmer Rouge Top Secret Documents,
Civilian Conservation Corps Newspapers, 1934-1942,
The Ethnic Press in the United States and more....

See the Full Story

Student Employee, Professor\'s Son, Steals $2 Million in Rare Books from Yale

The son of a Yale University professor, and summer employee of one of the University libraries has admitted to stealing items form the archives and selling them. Libraries whose collections contain rare materials are often an easy target for thieves, even though the libraries themselves take extensive precautionary measures to guard against theft. Since many libraries don\'t report the theft of materials, there is no way of knowing exactly how costly the problem really is, overall. More

Ex-Soviet Films and Photos on the Web

Carol Reed writes \"Newsday.com has an article on a Texas business man who is arranging to have the films and photos from several ex-Soviet Archives cataloged and put up on the Web.It looks like a very interesting project. It\'s still a work in progress, but the archives in Russia have a nearly complete collection of newsreels from 1919-1985, and the earliest film is of the coronation of Czar Nicholas II in 1896. Here\'s a link to the archives web page -- the link at the end of the Newsday.com story is somewhat messed up.\"

Archives Site Captures Web\'s Growing Pains

\"As a tool for archiving information, the Internet is a wonder, especially in its ability to make a variety of materials, from magazine articles to video clips, accessible to people around the world. But the Internet hasn\'t always been up to the job of archiving itself. That\'s changing, with the launch of the Wayback Machine, a repository of Web pages from the Internet Archive (www.archive.org), a nonprofit based in San Francisco. With the Wayback Machine, you can surf the Web as it was. Which means, in practical terms, the chance for researchers, historians and others to gaze back in time at snapshots of Web sites such as ESPN.com, Lycos or even out-of-business companies like Webvan.com. \'Wayback,\' it should be noted, means way back to 1996.\" More

U of T\'s porn test

Bob Cox sent along This Story from The Toronto Star on the largest collections of modern pornography in Canada now being cataloged at the University of Toronto, \"behind a door marked Do Not Enter — Alarmed Directly To The Toronto Police Service\".

Its acquisition makes U of T the first Canadian institution to own such materials, though the academic study of smut is well advanced in many places of higher learning in the United States.

\"Some of it is from Italy and goes back to the earliest days of filmmaking — there\'s one that I\'m guessing is from 1910 or 1915 because it\'s very jerky,\" says the professor. \"Oh, I guess I shouldn\'t use that word.\"

SAA Responds to Presidential Paper Restrictions

An excerpt from SAA President Steve Hensen\'s letter to Congress:

I write to express the grave concern of the Society of American Archivists with respect to the President’s recent Executive Order 13233 on Presidential Papers . . .

Our apprehension over this Executive Order is on several levels. First, it violates both the spirit and letter of existing U.S. law on access to presidential papers . . . This law establishes the principle that presidential records are the property of the United States government and that the management and custody of, as well as access to, such records should be governed by the Archivist of the United States and established archival principles—all within the statutory framework of the act itself. The Executive Order puts the responsibility for these decisions with the President, and indeed with any sitting President into the future. Access to the vital historical records of this nation should not be governed by executive decree; this is why the existing law was created . . .

Second, on a broader level this Executive Order potentially threatens to undermine one of the very foundations of our nation. Free and open access to information is the cornerstone to modern democratic societies around the world . . .

More. Thanks to librarian.net.

Smithsonian Museum and E-Bay Acquire Florida\'s Voting Machines

One of the voting machines used in the Florida year-2000 Presidential election is being immortalized in the Smithsonian Institute\'s Museum of American History. The remaining 3,499 machines are being auctioned off on E-Bay. \"The county is asking a minimum bid of $300 for a voting machine with brass plaque, a butterfly ballot, a certificate of authenticity, 25 sample punch-card ballots and a signed photo of the canvassing board. For a $600 minimum bid, they\'ll throw in all that, plus an aluminum ballot box.\"
more

Bush Clamping Down On Presidential Papers

From yesterday\'s Washington Post:

The Bush White House has drafted an executive order that would usher in a new era of secrecy for presidential records and allow an incumbent president to withhold a former president\'s papers even if the former president wanted to make them public.

The five-page draft would also require members of the public seeking particular documents to show \"at least a \'demonstrated, specific need\' \" for them before they would be considered for release . . .

\"The executive branch is moving heavily into the nether world of dirty tricks, very likely including directed assassinations overseas and other violations of American norms and the U.N. charter,\" said Vanderbilt University historian Hugh Graham. \"There is going to be so much to hide.\"

More.

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