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Recording History and Taking Part at the Same Time

Jen Young noticed A Neat One from The NYTimes on Columbia University's 9/11 Oral History Narrative and Memory Project.
What began as an effort to record history while it was fresh became more than that. It turned into an extended journey into the nature of memory itself, and a testament to the enduring power of the oldest, simplest human communication form: one voice in a room, telling a tale of how it all came down.

"I was less a historian than a participant," said Temma Kaplan, a professor of history at Rutgers University who did 18 interviews. "I wanted to be comforted, and confronted, not quite a voyeur but to be part of what was going on."

Book a good read - in 11 years

Jen Young sent over This One on the Nuremberg Chronicle, that has gone on display at the Art Gallery of South Australia.
Each fortnight one page will be turned in the Latin edition, which features more than 1800 illustrations – including biblical scenes and views of towns and maps printed from 645 woodblocks.
With a page being turned every 14 days, it will take about 11 1/2 years to read the book.

Two rare materials thieves apprehended, one sentenced.

I feel like Jack Webb! (or possibly Ed O\'Neill.) Reader Charles Davis sent in three different stories about individuals apprehended in thefts of rare materials. In brief:

  • Michael John Williams of Baltimore, Maryland had stolen Revolutionary War documents. Police tracked him down through the antiques dealer he had sold them to.
  • John Charles Gilkey of San Jose, California had used a stolen credit card to purchase a first-edition copy of The Grapes of Wrath. He was apprehended when he tried to pick up the package.
  • Neil Winstanley of London, England had stolen or damaged several priceless books while working in the Middle Temple law library. He was sentenced to nine months in prison.

Click below for more of the stories and links to the full content.

Michigan Library gets exhibit of biblical proportions

Bob Cox noticed This One on The Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit, opening next Sunday at the Grand Rapids Public Museum.
Up to 225,000 visitors are expected to come see some of the world\'s oldest biblical manuscripts, in an exhibit running through June 1. Tourism officials expect scroll-seekers will pump at least $5 million into the local economy, and the museum expects to earn close to $1 million above costs.

Lifting the Lid on a Treasure Chest

Jen Young points to a A NYTimes Story on a collection of literary and cultural treasures at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, part of the University of Texas.
Scholars know the Ransom Center as one of the world\'s pre-eminent research libraries, but until now the public has caught only fleeting glimpses into its rich chambers. That will change in April when the center opens its first galleries.

Copyright Issues Relevant to the Creation of a Digital Archive

\"As libraries move into the digital age, they increasingly face copyright and other intellectual property questions. Creating digital surrogates and using digital technologies to make copyrighted works available to the public raise many issues. For American librarians, June Besek\'s essay is a most welcome tool. She has analyzed the issues that librarians must address as they are asked to make decisions about what may be made available to their patrons in digital form, and in an unbiased way she has described these issues and their implications. Additionally, she has identified areas where there is much uncertainty and recommended further studies to narrow the issues and to suggest constructive solutions.\" (from CLIR)

Lifting the Lid on a Treasure Chest

\"During a rehearsal for \"A Streetcar Named Desire\" at the Barrymore Theater in New York more than half a century ago Marlon Brando dropped his address book.\"

\"I beg you return this,\" he had written inside the cover. \"I lost eight others already and if I lose this, I\'ll just drop dead\"

\"The finder, however, did not return it. Today it is part of a collection of literary and cultural treasures here at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, part of the University of Texas. (from The New York Times)

Internet Archive: Moving Image Archive

Rob Lopresti writes \"This is not really about libraries but I can\'t imagine a public or academic library that wouldn\'t be interested. Am I the last to discover the Movie Archive?


It contains thousands of short movies, mostly pre-1970 from what I saw, all ready to download or stream from the web. See \"The Librarian,\" a 1947 career guidance flick. Or \"A Day Called X\" about the nuclear destruction of Portland, Oregon (featuring the actual mayor). Or \"Destination Earth\" in which \"Martian dissidents learn that oil and competition are the two things that make America great.\" Amazing... \"

Cold blamed for National Library water leak

Sam King sent over More Bad News for the National Library of Canada.
recent cold snap in Ottawa is being blamed for a break in the water main this week at the National Library\'s storage facility.

The library\'s \'Response Action Team\' managed to save more than 2,000 books from water damage.

Water leaks are not a new problem for staff at the National Library. There have been as many as 72 floods since the early 1990s, says National Librarian Roch Carrier.

Thurmond's retirement boosts Clemson archive

TheState.com has This Story on Strom Thurmond's papers, which he has donated to Clemson, from which he graduated in 1923.
Burns estimates Clemson has received more than a million pieces of correspondence alone, plus speeches and other documents. But Clemson's collection includes more than papers. It also has more than 3,000 artifacts and memorabilia Thurmond received during his 70-plus-year political career.

"He saved everything," Burns said. "We're running out of space."

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