Archives

Heinlein archive gets $300k boost from widow's estate

Mock Turtle writes "The UC Santa Cruz archive of renowned science fiction writer Robert Heinlein has received a gift of materials and cash, valued at $300,000, from the estate of Heinlein’s late widow, Virginia.

The donation was accompanied by a grant to establish the position of a Heinlein Scholar at the campus, who will work to organize, document, and promote the scholarly use of the archive, housed in the University Library’s Special Collections since 1968.

William H. Patterson Jr. has been selected by UCSC as the campus Heinlein Scholar for 2003-04. Patterson is also the person designated by Heinlein’s late wife to write the definitive, authorized biography of her husband.

UC Santa Cruz Currents has more about Heinlein, Patterson, and the archive.

(There are a couple of neat old photos at the site as well.)"

Civil rights archives to go online

Mock Turtle writes "The Hattiesburg American reports:
The Institute of Museum and Library Services has awarded $463,322 to the University of Southern Mississippi to develop and launch the Mississippi Digital Library, providing online access to USM's extensive collection of materials on the civil rights movement. Letters, diaries, photographs, state and organizational records, oral histories, and other primary sources that provide firsthand documentation of the history of race relations in Mississippi will be included in the digital collection. USM is collaborating on the project with Delta State University, Jackson State University, Tougaloo College, the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, and the University of Mississippi."

Dershowitz to donate archives to Brooklyn College

Mock Turtle writes "Newsday reports that attorney Alan Dershowitz is donating an archive containing more than 1,000 boxes of memos, manuscripts, letters, legal documents, clippings, and other artifacts to his alma mater, Brooklyn College. Documents from the Simpson and von Bulow cases will be included."

Standards for Archival Description: A Handbook

David Dillard writes "Standards for Archival Description: A Handbook, from
The Society of American Archivists is a full text monograph online that is available at no cost to the reader at the above website. A significant part of the coverage of this
book is of interest and value to the general library user in general
collections as well as of importance in archival practice. The section
covering subject headings would be a prime example of this.

It's a music mecca

An Anonymous Patron writes "This Sacramento Bee article describes the Beethoven Center at San Jose State University."
They say the Ira F. Brilliant Center for Beethoven Studies, the only facility of its kind outside Europe devoted to the great composer.

With a multimillion-dollar collection of first-edition music, books, handwritten notes, and even a peculiar lock of hair no one dares touch, the center serves as a resource for everyone from scholars to armchair enthusiasts.

Online future for Nuremberg archive

Mock Turtle writes "The BBC reports that Harvard Law School plans to post the entire one-million-page archive of the Nuremberg trials to the Internet ... provided they can raise the $7 million required. Here's the story."
Harvard's Law School has already posted 7,000 pages on one of its own web sites but it says it needs as much as $7m to make the entire Nuremberg archive available.

From Movies to Minutia: DVDs Eyed for Archival Uses

A Slashdot Thread pointed the way to an NIST Data Preservation Program to develop specifications for "archival quality" CD and DVD media that agencies could use to ensure the procurement of sufficiently robust media for their long- term archiving needs (i.e., 50 years and longer).
The working group shares information and best practices concerning the use of DVD and related technologies in the federal government. It will identify the needs of the federal community in relation to the durability of storage media and work with industry to develop suitable archival grade specifications.

Princeton's archives hold many secrets.

Bob Cox spotted a Princeton Packet Article on the Mudd Library which contains an impressive array of archives, including a collection of U.S. public policy papers; the notebooks of Arthur Krock, former Washington bureau chief of The New York Times; the wartime journals of former CIA director Allen Dulles, John Foster's brother; the papers of former Democratic presidential candidates Adlai Stevenson and George McGovern; and the papers of former Secretary of State James A. Baker III.

Old files stress Oakdale Prison

The Iowa City Press-Citizen reports deep inside the prison at Oakdale sit hundreds, if not thousands, of files on former inmates, filling cabinets ringed by stacks of file boxes.
The records date from October 1984 to present and include paperwork on every person who has passed through the system - an estimated 20 million pages, up from 13 million four years ago. Similar records already have filled storage space at prisons in Anamosa, Fort Mad-ison, Mount Pleasant and Mitchellville.

Library of Congress saved roots of genre

An Anonymous Patron writes "This Says the Archive of American Folk Song was founded in 1928 within the Library's Music Division and curated by fabled folklorist John Lomax. In 1932, Lomax and his 17-year-old son, Alan, headed south with a 500-pound recording machine built into the trunk of their car. Sponsored by the Library, they were among the first folklorists to take equipment into the field, recording not only the folk songs they encountered but the personal histories of the musicians and the social and cultural contexts of the music.

The Lomaxes returned with a treasure trove of folk, blues, gospel, Cajun and Tex-Mex music. Alan Lomax recounted this and subsequent southern journeys in "The Land Where the Blu"

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