Archives

Letter from Liz I, other Archival Material up for Auction

Charles Davis writes "The Herald (UK) reports on the auction of archival material, including a letter written by Elizabeth I which sheds new light on her doomed relationship with Mary Queen of Scots. In the nearly illegible 5 pages, Elizabeth expresses outrage over Mary's imprisonment on an island in Loch Leven in 1567. The letter is from one of the world's finest collections of British documents, covering almost 1000 years of history. The archive, estimated to be worth £2m, is the property of Americans Harry and Birgitte Spiro.
The Christie's auction, which will take place in London on December 3, involves 160 items from the collection."

Sotheby's to sell rare occult book collection

LISNews British Correspondent Charles Davis writes: "Story at
The Guardian:

Books from one of the most eccentric collections in the country are being sold to settle some of the collector's debts.

The Sotheby's auction next month will include around 600 books, mainly on witchcraft and the occult: a tiny part of the vast library of
the late artist Robert Lenkiewicz.

It includes a 17th century spotter's guide to witches and demons, by Joseph Glanvill. His Saducismus Triumphatus was a desperate
attempt to convince sceptics that ghosts and demons were all too real, and included the first-hand evidence of one Elizabeth Styles
that the devil had appeared to her 'in the shape of a handsome Man and after of a black Dog. Then he promised her money, and that
she should live gallantly, and have the pleasure of the world for 12 years, if she would with her blood sign his paper'"

Letters show Lady Nelson capable of love after all.

Charles Davis writes: "Unlike Emma Hamilton she never whipped off her knickers to dance on dining tables - but Lord Nelson's wife, Frances, was not the
dry old shrew that history has painted her either.

A lost hoard of Lady Nelson's piteous letters about her errant husband found in a trunk in Germany two years ago are finally
revealing their secrets. And it is Lady Hamilton, who stole the naval hero's heart, who plays the role of villain.

Beautiful, scheming, entrancing Emma made sure that the plainer Frances was elbowed out for the rest of Nelson's life.
Story at
The Guardian"

Historic newsreel freezes 12 million moments in time on Internet

Here's An Article on BritishPathe.com a collection of more than 12 million historic photographs, capturing scenes from the Boer War to the D-Day landings. The images, which date back to the turn of the 20th century, have been captured from the archives of the British Pathe newsreel, a cinema news service that pre-dated television.

The unique collection has been created by re-scanning every inch of the archive's 3,500 hours of 35mm film.

Oxford college cellar unearths rare views of Canada

Charles Davis writes "from
The Guardian:

A filthy bundle of papers, which had been lying in a corner of the cellars of Balliol College in Oxford for at least a century, has turned
out to contain rare landscapes of 18th century Canada, including the oldest known views of the green hills and scattered houses
around what are now the cities of Montreal and Quebec.

The paintings, by a British army officer who was also a talented amateur artist, include scenes of Niagara Falls before it became one
of the most popular tourist attractions in the world."

Museum discovers Lewis & Clark letters

The Associated Press Reports Three letters that explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark wrote during and after their expedition 200 years ago are on view at the Cincinnati Museum Center.

The letters had been in the Cincinnati Historical Society's archives since 1885. They were donated by Aaron Torrence, son of an executor for the estate of James Findley, a soldier who was an associate of the explorers but didn't go on their expedition.

Rare photos given to San Francisco museum

Charles Davis writes "Story from
bayarea.com

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art's venerable photography collection has grown noticeably richer with the
donation of more than 100 ``rare and precious'' photographs from the 19th and 20th centuries by some of the
medium's most important practitioners.

Collectors Carla Emil, a member of the museum's board of trustees, and her husband, Rich Silverstein, a San Francisco
advertising executive, have agreed to give the museum works by such seminal 19th century photographers as Eugene
Atget, Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll and such 20th century masters as Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Alfred
Steiglitz and Paul Strand."

Archimedes Lost Book - sold for $ 2 million

Steve Fesenmaier writes "PBS' Nova series broadcast one of the most interesting investigations into a lost book I have ever seen. Archimedes wrote a book on his "Methods." For hundreds of years the book was lost, reused by medieval monks. Recently it was sold for millions to an unnamed billionaire. Researchers are discovering that Archimedes knew much more about infinity than anyone believed.
Visit the website at pbs.org"

Preserving Ephemera of Recall Campaign

rteeter writes "The New York Times has this article on archivists rushing to preserve material from the California recall election. (Registration required)"

They say With just over a week before the election, their campaign bumper stickers, buttons, Web sites and in one case thong underwear are becoming treasured artifacts. Researchers, archivists and historians holed up in museum offices and library basements across the state — people who normally think in terms of years not days — are scurrying to preserve the stuff of this election.

Heinlein archive gets $300k boost from widow's estate

Mock Turtle writes "The UC Santa Cruz archive of renowned science fiction writer Robert Heinlein has received a gift of materials and cash, valued at $300,000, from the estate of Heinlein’s late widow, Virginia.

The donation was accompanied by a grant to establish the position of a Heinlein Scholar at the campus, who will work to organize, document, and promote the scholarly use of the archive, housed in the University Library’s Special Collections since 1968.

William H. Patterson Jr. has been selected by UCSC as the campus Heinlein Scholar for 2003-04. Patterson is also the person designated by Heinlein’s late wife to write the definitive, authorized biography of her husband.

UC Santa Cruz Currents has more about Heinlein, Patterson, and the archive.

(There are a couple of neat old photos at the site as well.)"

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