Archives

Months-old Arizona state archives facility closes

Less than two weeks after its dedication, the new state archives building closes today, the latest consequence of the state's budget struggles.

The $38 million building, named after longtime lawmaker Polly Rosenbaum, opened late last fall and was dedicated in mid-January.

But on Tuesday, agency Director GladysAnn Wells announced the closure. It was the only way she could figure out how to carve $1.45 million from the $2 million remaining in the budget of the state Department of Library, Archives and Public Records, Wells said.

Dangerous Archives

The building that houses the Historic Archive of the city of Cologne, with documents up to 1,000 years old, partially collapsed yesterday. The building was an unremarkable 20th-century structure -- photos show the front half as a pile of rubble -- but no word on the fate of the valuable archives it contained.

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A Lost Art

A century from now our handwriting may be legible only to experts. The author of a book on the history of handwriting says that handwriting is declining so fast that ordinary, joined-up script may become as hard to read as a medieval manuscript. “When your great-great-grandchildren find that letter of yours in the attic, they’ll have to take it to a specialist, an old guy at the library who would decipher the strange symbols for them,” she says.

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Digital Archivists, Now in Demand

WHEN the world entered the digital age, a great majority of human historical records did not immediately make the trip.

Literature, film, scientific journals, newspapers, court records, corporate documents and other material, accumulated over centuries, needed to be adapted for computer databases. Once there, it had to be arranged — along with newer, born-digital material — in a way that would let people find what they needed and keep finding it well into the future.

The people entrusted to find a place for this wealth of information are known as digital asset managers, or sometimes as digital archivists and digital preservation officers. Whatever they are called, demand for them is expanding.

Full story in the New York Times

Understanding Archiving Requirements: Seven Guiding Principles For A Defensible And Compliant Infrastructure Strategy

From the GC to the CIO down to the storage administrator, there has been no lack of discussion on new rules for managing data and electronic documents. Everything from regulatory compliance such as Sarbanes-Oxley to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure has made IT aware that they need to be ready to archive more data longer. Yet the most common refrain heard is: "I know I need to do something, just someone tell me what I specifically have to do." How do you cut through the fog, and develop specific technical requirements for saving, managing and deleting data in an archival system? Despite confusion, archiving of data can actually be broken down into fundamental requirements.

LISTen and Hyperlinked History by The Faceless Historian

While Stephen deals with the stress of moving, he asked that I fill in for him for a special episode of LISTen - The LISNews Podcast. As my alter-ego, The Faceless Historian, I'll take you on a journey through history back to the distant past and the origins of the DRM and copying controversies we deal with today.

Stephen and the regular LISTen gang will be back next week with your regularly scheduled podcast. In the meantime, I hope you enjoy something a little different about something related to issues we face in libraries today.

Head of South Carolina Archives and History Cuts His Own Job

The director of the S.C. Department of Archives and History is cutting his own job to two days a week to help his agency deal with the latest round of budget cuts.

Rodger Stroup, 62, had planned to retire as director of the agency in February after working 30 years in state government, but the agency board of directors asked him to stay on through June while it searches for his replacement. Stroup agreed.

Then as the agency staff worked to trim the budget yet again in December, Stroup opted to cut his own work schedule to save somebody else’s job.

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Losing Our memories

The chief executive of the British Library is worried.
He fears that digital records — from the photographs on our personal computers to the records of political parties and businesses — are vanishing, that “historians and citizens of the future will find a black hole in the knowledge base of the 21st century.”

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Lincoln Cathedral (UK) Magna Carta on Display at Reagan Library

A copy of the Magna Carta is the centerpiece of a new exhibition at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in Simi Valley.

USA Today reports on the exhibition that runs til June 20 and will include scenes from life in England in 1215, the year the Magna Carta was recorded.

According to the cathedral's website, the bishops of Lincoln were among the magnates of medieval England and when the Magna Carta was drawn up in 1215, one of the witnesses was Hugh of Wells, Bishop of Lincoln, who returned with his copy to the city. Today Lincoln's copy of the document is only one of four originals from 1215 that still exist.

Repository services, Galleries vs. self-storage units, Supporting deposit and access

John Mark Ockerbloom explains how that for a viable institutional repository, you need quite a bit more than just “a place to put stuff”: you need a suite of services that support its purposes. In Part 2, he enumerates some of the specific services that we need or find useful in our institutional scholarship repository.

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