Presidential Libraries

Libraries: shrines to presidents\' egos

SomeOne writes \"IndyStar.com has a short but firm editorial that says Presidential papers should be housed in the Library of Congress, calling presidential liraries \"monuments to ego.\" They add taxpayers are subsidizing multimillionaires. The libraries guarantee the subsidization will go on forever.

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Union criticizes spending on Lincoln library

Jen Young noticed Another Story on the troubles at the Abraham Lincoln Library and Museum. Illinois taxpayers paid at least $287,000 for a ceremony to dedicate the new library/museum. The cost was criticized by officials of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Council 31, which rallied at the state Capitol on Monday to protest Ryan\'s closing of correctional facilities, mental health centers and homes for the developmentally disabled.

Political cloud over Lincoln library

The Chicago Sun Times has a Story on the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum, opening soon in the heart of the state capital.
But even before Gov. Ryan cuts a ribbon to dedicate the library today, there could be tension brewing over who will run one of the lame-duck governor's most prized building projects after he leaves office in January.

There is a problem with one of the people thought to be the one named to be the director for the $115 million library and museum.

National Archives officials say Clinton library unique to system

More Information is coming out on Bill Clinton\'s presidential library. Construction is well under way on the $160 million complex next to the popular River Market district on the south bank of the river, slated to open in 2004, will be encircled by a public park, an outdoor amphitheater with lawn seating for 2,000 and pedestrian walkways through the arboretum and open green spaces.

\"Everyone knows that a presidential library will have an economic impact on the city, but this is the first time that has actually been used as a catalyst,\" Fawcett said.

Plans for Woodrow Wilson Library

Charles Davis writes \" Woodrow Wilson
lived in an old whitewashed house in this town for just a year after his birth. He
returned only briefly in college before becoming the nation\'s 28th president.
But locals aren\'t letting Wilson\'s lack of time in Staunton keep them from
moving forward with plans to build a presidential library in his honor – an
unusual step considering he left office 81 years ago.
Story at
The Washington Post \"

Nixon daughters end library dispute

Jen Young sent along the Good News that Richard Nixon\'s daughters have resolved their two-year dispute over how to spend a $20 million bequest for their father\'s presidential library, attorneys said.

Tricia Cox and Julie Eisenhower completed a court-ordered mediation Wednesday, but details of the closed-door meeting were not released.

Sisters try to resolve Nixon library dispute

Almost There. Richard Nixon\'s daughters met behind closed doors Tuesday in an attempt to resolve their two-year fight over how to spend a $20 million bequest for their father\'s presidential library.

No agreement had been reached in the daylong, court-ordered meeting, but Tricia Cox said she and her sister, Julie Eisenhower, were making progress. The meeting was continuing late Tuesday night.

Clinton library as complex as his presidential legacy

Bob Cox sent over This Washington Times Story that says the hard part for the new library will be capturing the smoke-in-a-bottle legacy of the man from Hope — supposedly the good and the bad as well as the ugly — inside the glass and steel monument.

Library offers history seen through Nixon\'s point of view

Bob Cox sent along This Sacramento Bee Story on the Nixon Library. They say it reflects the perspective of one man who was the center of a sordid chapter in American presidential history, it\'s worth a visit if only for \"a fascinating journey through history.\"
One of the most heartening elements of the nine-acre complex is the simple home in Yorba Linda where Nixon was born and spent the first nine years of his life.

Note: New story category here.

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