Presidential Libraries

First Taiwanese Presidential Library

Former president Lee Teng-hui(§õµn½÷)[sic]has agreed to a plan to build a special library to house the books and documents he amassed during his 12-year presidency, a TSU legislator said.

How valuable do you think presidential libraries are?

Read the full story.

Why Are the Libraries of Great Presidents So Mediocre

Bob Cox spotted This One that says look at the Web sites and listing of events at FDR, LBJ, and Ronald Reagan's libraries, and you see just plain vanilla, pedestrian notices that lack just about everything that intelligent Americans would desire of presidential libraries.

Clinton signs library’s last beam into place

Bill writes "It has taken two weeks, 402 fine-tip markers and a college student with a bad case of writer’s cramp to sign the names of more than 5,000 donors onto the white beam.

Armed with a new Sharpie and surrounded by workers building the multimillion-dollar presidential library that the beam is a part of, Bill Clinton made the marker count 403.

More than 3,000 people cheered Friday as the former president signed his name to the beam that completes the skeleton of his presidential library in Little Rock.

Full Story. "

Little Rock Pushes Future Clinton Library

kansascity.com Reports The Clinton Presidential Library Foundation has erected 10 billboards featuring an artist's rendition of the future downtown library, hoping to make Little Rock and its library complex an international tourist destination.

Bush library celebrates millionth visitor

Barbara Maxwell was the millionth visitor to the library complex since it opened in 1997. The former president presented the Maxwells with a signed bust of himself and posed for pictures with the beaming couple.

Ironically, the Maxwells — who divide their time between homes in Pennsylvania and Florida — own four pairs of boots now on display in the library’s “Legends of the West” exhibit. They decided to stop by the library on the tail end of a cross-country business trip.
Full Story.

Ex-Air Force One jet will be moved to Reagan Library

A Boeing 707 jet that served as Air Force One for seven U.S. presidents will be moved to a hilltop pavilion at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum and is expected to be on display by mid-2004.

The jet was on view for a private ceremony Friday to mark the start of "Operation Homeward Bound," in which engineers will disassemble, transport and reassemble the plane at its new home about 40 miles northwest of Los Angeles.

Full Story.

Guv's got to clean up Ryan's library mess

An unknown benefactor submitted this:

Chicago Sun-Times columnist Steve Neal writes about the debacle over the leadership at the Abraham Lincoln library. Rehashing the surprisingly sordid history produces quotes like, "In a vengeful act, after removing his name as a contender for library director, Newtson used his influence as Ryan's chief of staff to sabotage the library and museum. Newtson diverted half of the library's operating funds--$1.5 million--to the former Public Policy Institute at the University of Illinois at Springfield. Most of its programs have nothing to do with Lincoln."

Reviewing Presidential Tapes and Their Place in History

There's A NYTimes Story on a two-day conference on the Nixon tapes. John Carlin, archivist of the United States, said it would be several months before experiments on blank tape from the Nixon era would show whether it was worth exposing the erased part of the tape to the risks of restoration by current technology.
They also discussed unreleased tapes of Kennedy's, and from the Johnson administration. Everyone at the conference was delighted with the availability of presidential tapes and their being broadcast.

Meanwhile, The Richard Nixon Library & Birthplace broke ground on an expansion that will double its size and feature a full-size replica of the White House East Room. The Los Angeles Daily News has Nixon, Reagan libraries bring history buff west.

Reviewing Presidential Tapes and Their Place in History

"As loudspeakers played the tape-recorded voices of Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon, scholars, journalists and curious citizens pondered what presidential tape recordings have already added to history and what still-secret tapes may show, and whether the 18 1/2-minute gap would ever be filled. The hum from the gap was also played."

"At a two-day conference on the tapings, which concluded this afternoon at the Kennedy Library here, John Carlin, archivist of the United States, said it would be several months before experiments on blank tape from the Nixon era would show whether it was worth exposing the erased part of the tape to the risks of restoration by current technology. The erasure on the June 20, 1972, tape, remains one of the great mysteries of the Watergate era. H. R. Haldeman, Nixon's chief of staff, took notes that indicated he and the president had discussed Watergate in the June 20 meeting, just three days after the burglary." (from The New York Times)

New Lincoln library is at center of a small civil war

Jen Young points us to This STLToday Article on The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum that was meant to become a world-renowned shrine to Illinois' favorite son. They say some fear it has fallen prey to another Illinois institution - politics.

Syndicate content