Public Libraries

library alters its policy on book list

This Story is a follow up on the report we had a few weeks ago on a charge of censorship in a library.

In the aftermath of a charge of censorship, the Schaumburg Township library board has revised its policy on how new materials are added to its collection.
On Monday, the board voted to add an appeals process to the policy. The move came a month after the board denied a request by Hoffman Estates resident Christopher Bollyn to donate a copy of \"Final Judgment\" by Michael Collins Piper to the library.
The library\'s criteria to decide whether to acquire a book, ranges from the reputation or significance of the author to reviews of the material and its cost. -- Read More

Library turns to collection agency

Michigan Live sure does have alot of library stories. This one is about how The Georgetown Township Library is now using a collection agency for fine collection.


Patrons with more than $50 in lost or long-overdue materials from the Georgetown Township Library could end up with a black mark on their credit report.
The Township Board recently approved a proposal by library officials that will allow the library to start a program to recover some of the more than $22,000 in materials owed by patrons.
Of the amount owed, $18,637.67 is owed by patrons in the library service area; the remainder is owed by patrons from other libraries and through interlibrary loans.
Library officials hope to begin the program by May 1 for 131 patrons with outstanding bills of at least $50. They expect to recover $11,880.67 through the program.

-- Read More

County Council ousts 4 library trustees

greenvillenews.com has a story on house cleaning in the Greenville County.

Concerned about operations and what they perceive as mismanagement at the Greenville County Library, members of the County Council cleaned house Tuesday with their decision to replace four of five incumbents in the election of seven trustees.

Council Chairman Dozier Brooks said he thinks there was a lot of concern about operations problems and mismanagement at the library in addition to the council\'s interest in wanting to move ahead on plans for a new library.

\"I just felt like there was a lack of oversight at the library, and I think we\'ve elected seven good people to get the problems solved and keep us on schedule with plans for a new county library,\" Brooks said. -- Read More

Internet Filtering

Ray McBride writes \"The following appeared in South Carolina\'s State Newspaper on Sunday 13 February 2000.\"

Library access to Internet not problem it\'s perceived to be.
By Jim Johnson

South Carolina\'s public libraries are being characterized in press reports as being places where children are exposed to pornography over the Internet. Reading these reports gives the impression public libraries are cyber adult book-stores. Nothing could be further from the truth, Public libraries take their role in providing services, including Internet access, to children very seriously. Every public library in the state has an Internet use policy which outlines acceptable and unacceptable behavior. -- Read More

Libraries try to get a reading on future needs

The Sacramento Public Library plans its future. Read about it Here. From the The Sacramento Bee.

\"What we\'re doing is having workshop participants envision what they want their library to be in the year 2020,\" said Richard Killian, library director. \"What are the things we need to do as a library, not to just keep up, but to move ahead?\"

Starting today, library officials will hold the workshops around the county.

Magnet libraries may be option to forced closures

Read about this possible solution Here. From the Tacoma Washington News Tribune.

To offset budget cuts, Tacoma Public Library branches in East, Central and South Tacoma may lose materials but gain literacy and career-training programs.

Administrators say this \"magnet library\" concept would help avoid closing branches. Four of the system\'s sleepiest libraries - King, Mottet, South Tacoma and Swan Creek - would devote more space and materials to themes such as literacy or computers and drop some of their collections aimed at the general public.

Science exhibit brings children in

A Story on how a
science exhibit in St. Joseph County Public Library,
Indiana, was a huge hit with the kids.


This year, for the first time, all of the area\'s
higher-education institutions were exhibitors. They include
the University of Notre Dame, Indiana University South Bend,
Saint Mary\'s College, Bethel College in Mishawaka, Ivy Tech
State College, and the Purdue University School of
Technology at South Bend -- Read More

Library mixed-use branches

Oregon Live has a
story on how the government wants new libraries to be
built.
The 5 story structures are raising some concerns.

Library Director Ginnie Cooper finds herself in an
interesting position because the five county commissioners,
her bosses, have made it a priority for departments to
consider building mixed-use facilities. The idea is to
increase density in neighborhoods by putting county
facilities on the ground floor and housing or office space
above. A portion of the housing at each branch will have
carry cheaper rents for people in lower econom -- Read More

Cell phone rule leaves Lexington libraries quieter

A Story on a crack down on cell phone use in SC.

There\'s less talk in Lexington County\'s nine libraries these days, and officials are happy about it.
A two-month effort to curtail mobile telephone conversations among the bookshelves is working well, members of the County Library Board were told Tuesday.

Signs put up asking that such calls be made in hallways or outside are reducing the talk that annoys others users, library Executive Director Daniel MacNeill said.

\"I would say at this point this is all we need to do,\" he said.

quiet as a library.

A Story from Sacbee.com on a quiet first night of operations.

After months of planning and anticipation, the Central Library stayed open at night for the first time Wednesday.
It was, well, quiet as a library.

With the exception of nearly constant activity at eight Internet-access computers, patronage was sparse in almost every corner of the downtown library.

After a brief, post-work rush, there were few children on the children\'s floor, study carrels were mostly empty, photocopy rooms were dark and but a few eyes peered at periodicals. -- Read More

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