Public Libraries

It’s party time at Eagle library

The Eagle Public Library in Idaho Celebrates Its One-year Anniversary. Read about it Here. From the Idaho Statesman.

Since openingone year ago thanks to the approval of a $2.85 million bond, the Eagle Public Library has more than doubled its collection and circulation rates. And the number of people visiting the library has jumped from 50 to 288 each day.

Eating between the lines

The Toronto Star has This Story on how osme libraries are letting people eat. Good to see libraries changing with the times.

For years, librarians have read the riot act to patrons caught eating or drinking in the stacks. But they now say the influence of Chapters and other big bookstores - where customers wander the aisles with food and drink from the in-store cafés - has spilled over to libraries, making it tougher to enforce the no-food-or-drink rule. ``I think people are a little on edge\'\' about the change, said chief librarian Mike Ridley. ``There\'s concern that the collection may be at risk. The fact is, people take books out and do even worse things to them at home.\'\' -- Read More

Strike called off in T.O.

TORONTO (CP) - A tentative deal was reached late Monday between the city\'s public library and its workers.
The 2,500 library workers had set a weekend strike deadline, but the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 416 and city officials agreed to keep talking.

The main issues in the dispute were wages, job security, hours of work and shift premiums.

A strike would have closed 98 libraries.

The agreement is subject to ratification by both the board and the union.

Maybe 13 is too young

Not everyone is happy about the video rental policy in MA, Story Here.

An Easthampton woman whose 13-year-old son recently came home from the library with several R-rated videos is mounting a campaign to give parents a say in what their children can check out from the library\'s collection.
Bennett, however, was not so happy. She and \"quite a few\" supporters plan to petition the library\'s executive board at its monthly meeting March 13 to set up a card system for library patrons under the age of 17 that will allow parents to indicate whether their children should be allowed to check out R-rated videos.

\"I\'m not (trying to) take away anybody\'s freedom,\" Bennett said yesterday, stressing that it should be up to parents to decide for their own children under age 17 whether they should have access to films that the movie industry has deemed suitable only for those aged 17 and above.

library restores Internet link

This Story from Hudsonville, MI.

The Gary Byker Memorial Library\'s Internet computers, which
had been unplugged since December, will fire up once again
after a city commission decision Wednesday to repeal an
Internet filter ordinance.
The city commission voted 6-1 in favor of an ordinance
submitted by about 80 Hudsonville residents asking that an
ordinance to filter all but one computer be repealed. -- Read More

new limit for R-rated films is age 12

A story from Philadelphia shows kids
where to get R-Rated movies.


UPDATEA Report on the lack of protests.

Most favor
the Philadelphia system\'s decision to open access for
children as young as 12, down from 14.


Last year, the Free Library of Philadelphia got into a flap
over its policy of letting children as young as 14 borrow
R-rated movies.

Yesterday, library president Elliot L. Shelkrot acknowledged
that the policy had been changed. Now borrowers as young as
12 have access to all material, including videos.

\"The change in age is in response to the public,\" Shelkrot
said.
Only in four systems surveyed, including Detroit and San
Diego, were borrowers required to be 18 or older to take -- Read More

Public peeved about S.F. library

A story on the new library in San Francisco, CA.


A city-commissioned report calling for $28 million in fixes to the 3-year-old Main Library received its first public airing.

The $240,000 report was commissioned to find solutions to a shortage of library shelf space and to complaints that books were difficult to find. But several of the nearly 60 people who attended Thursday night\'s meeting were disabled and worried the direction of the study would exclude them from the library\'s services.
\"Get a little sense,\" said the 54-year-old San Francisco resident as he addressed the commissioners and the team of library experts that worked on the study. \"I can\'t believe the commission paid to have this survey done.\" -- Read More

library alters its policy on book list

This Story is a follow up on the report we had a few weeks ago on a charge of censorship in a library.

In the aftermath of a charge of censorship, the Schaumburg Township library board has revised its policy on how new materials are added to its collection.
On Monday, the board voted to add an appeals process to the policy. The move came a month after the board denied a request by Hoffman Estates resident Christopher Bollyn to donate a copy of \"Final Judgment\" by Michael Collins Piper to the library.
The library\'s criteria to decide whether to acquire a book, ranges from the reputation or significance of the author to reviews of the material and its cost. -- Read More

Library turns to collection agency

Michigan Live sure does have alot of library stories. This one is about how The Georgetown Township Library is now using a collection agency for fine collection.


Patrons with more than $50 in lost or long-overdue materials from the Georgetown Township Library could end up with a black mark on their credit report.
The Township Board recently approved a proposal by library officials that will allow the library to start a program to recover some of the more than $22,000 in materials owed by patrons.
Of the amount owed, $18,637.67 is owed by patrons in the library service area; the remainder is owed by patrons from other libraries and through interlibrary loans.
Library officials hope to begin the program by May 1 for 131 patrons with outstanding bills of at least $50. They expect to recover $11,880.67 through the program.

-- Read More

County Council ousts 4 library trustees

greenvillenews.com has a story on house cleaning in the Greenville County.

Concerned about operations and what they perceive as mismanagement at the Greenville County Library, members of the County Council cleaned house Tuesday with their decision to replace four of five incumbents in the election of seven trustees.

Council Chairman Dozier Brooks said he thinks there was a lot of concern about operations problems and mismanagement at the library in addition to the council\'s interest in wanting to move ahead on plans for a new library.

\"I just felt like there was a lack of oversight at the library, and I think we\'ve elected seven good people to get the problems solved and keep us on schedule with plans for a new county library,\" Brooks said. -- Read More

Syndicate content