Public Libraries

A Moving Experience @ Your Library

I think we rean a story Like This One long ago.
Schoolchildren formed a chain three blocks long and passed book after book from the Thornville, OH old library to its new one yesterday morning. The 310 students hand-delivered about 800 books to the new library.


Next time I move into a new apartment I want to move this way! Any volunteers?

Christian books raise eyebrows

Florida\'s Lakes Region Library set up a display of
books titled \"Christian Fiction\" sitting near the check-out
desk with about 100 books. A patron raised a ruckos,
so they changed the name of the display to
\"Inspirational Fiction\". They even talk about how The
Library of Congress classifies \"Christian fiction\" books,
but, there is not an equivalent category for Buddhist
fiction or other types of religious fiction. She plans to file
a complaint in U.S. District Court against the county.
Full Story

\"We try to provide a broad diversity of viewpoints
and many types of subject matter,\" Rogers said. \"That
does not mean the library endorses those ideas. We
are a neutral provider of information, so you can come
in and select what you choose.\"

Library audit finds 12% of books lost

Bob Cox says Dallas News is running A Story that says 12 percent of its books are gone, and the library system has no collection agency for pursuing nearly $3.5 million in fines for overdue and lost materials.

Is there such thing as an acceptable loss rate?

Minneapolis PL bans chess

Salon is carrying an AP article that says the Minneapolis Public Library has temporarily banned the game of chess because the players were becoming disruptive.

I guess some people just can\'t stand chess nuts boasting in an open foyer.

The Ol\' Bookmobile

Idahostatesman.com has a cool Story on a traveling library created in 1898 by the women of the Boise Colombian Club. The books were loaded into wooden crates and shipped by stagecoach or train to a library station. The article outlines the entire history of libraries in ID.

Fees Dropped Patrons Pop

Janet Clark writes:\"
In Alberta most public libraries charge a membership fee. Librarians know
the arguments for and against that. Not a deterrent, some say. The
January/February 2001 issue of _Alberta News_ story \'Banff\'s very public
library\' by Shelley Mardiros tells how Banff removed the fee and had three
times as many new members as in the previous January:
Full Story

On the following pages in the print version someone sent me is \'Book angel:
taking the spirit of reading to the back roads in a blue Chevy Astro\' by
Dan Rubenstein. The story is about seventy-on-year-old Kathleen Evans who
provides reading material to rural kids, on her own time and at her own
expense. I can\'t seem to find this story in the electronic version, but I
recommend it - we always need that warm fuzzy counterpoint to the filtering
and e-book stories.

If you open, they will come ...

Brian writes \"A library in Florida tries out Sunday hours and discovers that people come in and check out books. Story in the St. Petersburg Times.\"


And a completely unrelated story from NY has the memebers of New York City\'s largest librarians\' union getting a 16% raise. They [City Hall] had to defend the unusually large raises by saying they are having \"extraordinary\" problems with recruiting and retaining librarians See the NYTimes Story.

It\'s official: public libraries in Oz are for rec

Steve Benson writes \"A comprehensive survey of user satisfaction in public libraries in New South Wales has found that the greatest appeal of their services is for recreation and fun. The survey was done on 15,000 library visitors and the results are detailed in this this Sydney Morning Herald article \"

I wonder if this would be any different in other countries?

Integrating Libraries

Lee Hadden writes: \"We sometimes forget that many of the heroes in librarianship are not
necessarily the library staff, but the public library patrons. Here is an
account from the Washington Post about the integration of the public
library in Loudoun County, VA.\"


It was April 9, 1957, Loudoun County\'s only \"public\" library, in Purcellville, opened its doors to black patrons.

Urban Blight- Public libraries to the Rescue!

Lee Hadden passed this along:
\"National Public Radio\'s Cheryl Corley
reports on a program in Chicago that\'s using public libraries to unite
divided communities and bring economic growth to forgotten neighborhoods.
Several other cities are now following suit, strategically planting new
libraries to help revitalize struggling areas.
This was broadcast on April 2 on the public radio show \"Morning Edition.\"
Hear the broadcast on your computer HERE

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